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CHEERING SECTION 

High school cheerleaders 
featured /PAGES C14 & 15 



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GRIDIRON REVIEW 

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, AH0757 12/27/99 
^HTIflCH TDHHSHIP LIORftRY 
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HARVEST SEASON 

Bushels of pick your 
own farms / PAGE B1 



f?y. [:??f?!?P. s ..7: 68 Pa ? es October 1-7 



Antioch woman dies m boating aca 




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Boating season ends in tragedy 
with fatal accident on Fox Lake 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 



For the second time In 366 days, 
the end of the boating season meant 
a fatality on the Chain 0' Lakes. 

A 34 year-old from Antioch, 
Shanyl (Howard) Peterson, died 
from injuries sustained In a late- 



night crash on Fox Lake Sept 24. 

The boats were comparable (n 
size, according to Lake County 
Comoner's office. Head injuries was 
listed as cause of death. 

One boat, driven by Thomas 
Beran, of Chicago, allegedly struck 
the boat Peterson was a passenger In. 
The accident took place at 1035 p.m. 



at Indian Point. 

, Both boats were 21 feet long, 
according to Lake County Marine 
Unit. One was at anchor and anoth- 
er, driven by Beran, struck the boat 
Peterson was in. Beran had a blood 
alcohol content of .15, while the legal 
limit is .08, the same for motorists. 

"The other boat hit the boat at 
anchor and went completely over the 
top," SgL Kevin Parker of the Lake 
County Marine Unit said. 

It Is disputed whether or not the 
lights were on at the parked boat, 



between the middle of the lake and 
one-fourth mile from shore. 

Charges against Beran were 
pending. 

This was the first fatal boating 
crash on the Chain O' Lakes In 1999. 
Last year's aeddent took place off 
Leisure Point. 

"They were one year and one day 
apart," said James Wlpper, deputy 
Lake County coroner. 

Pete Jakstas, owner of Mineola 
Marine, provided use of his rescue 
boat to assist Fox Lake Fire Depart- 



ment paramedics. 

"I have been donating my equip- 
ment, an air boat for Ice rescues and 
a rescue boat in the summer for 46 
years," said Jakstas, who Is also 
Emergency Services Disaster coordi- 
nator for Fox Lake. 

The crash took place on Fox 
Lake, 1.5 miles from Indian Point 

Fox Lake Fire Department 
dispatched 17 personnel to the 
scene. Two people were treated for 

Please see ACCIDENT M4 



A special 

reunion 



50 years later, Antioch Township 

High School classes of '48 and '49 

gather to renew old friendships 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



A couple of years of 
planning and a lot of 
reminiscing will culmi- 
nate in a weekend of 
renewed friendships and fellowship 
for 51 members of the Antioch 
Township High School (ATHS) 
Classes of MB and '49. 

The joint reunion Is being put 
together by a group of volunteer , 
committee members from the Class 



of '49, which Is celebrating its 50th 
reunion. 

"It started with an idea for our 
40lh reunion, but we never got 
around to completing it," quipped 
Mariene (Nader) Cola, who is the 
unofficial head of the corrimittee. 

In reality, It was about three 
years ago a couple of the committee 
members decided to try to organize 
something. The idea of advance 
planning came down to most of the 

Please see REUNION IA4 




Bev Reckers, Antioch Community High School Class of 1949, and Don Holem, Class of 1948, 
decorate the float for this weekend's Homecoming Parade on Sept. 28.-Pftoro by Sandy Bressner 



Chamber expands focus 
to include more industry 



Illinois EPA plans to host 
hearing on developments 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry is focusing on making 
sure its .membership Includes all 
aspects of its name. 

Barbara Porch, new executive 
director, and DeeDee Palmer, presi- 
dent, agree they need more involve- 
ment from die industrial sector of 
the Antioch business community. 

"Our Chamber mission state- 
ment says we are to promote civic, 
commercial and Industrial needs 
within the community," said Porch, 
a lifelong resident of Antioch and 
owner of Choosey Child. 

r To facilitate this growth within 
the^ Intluatrial community, the 
Chamber will iwwt. quarterly 



'Tlie Cluwibcr hopes to serve 

as a liaison, to fill a void and 

step in to try and develop 

more of an industrial 

base within the community 

and the Chamber* 

Barbara PorcK 

new executive director, Antioch 

Chamber of Commerce 

meetings directed at the needs and 
issues relating to industry. 

The first such meeting Is sched- 
uled for 8 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 10 
at the Mapletliorpe Community 
Room within the Community Build- 
ing on Main Street. 



"Unfortunately, we've had a 
difficult time- Incorporating the 
industry Into our membership," 
Porch said. "It's not because we 
don't want to. It's because we didn't 
have a good handle on their needs 
and how our sources could play a 
part In meeting those." 

"We're going to bring members 
of Industry in, along with village 
administration," Porch explained. 
"We had an information sharing 
session witfi industry representa- 
tives, and some^ of their concerns 
relate to the village." 

"The Chamber hopes to serve as 
a liaison, to fill a void and step In to 
try and develop more of an industri- 
al base within the community and 

Please see CHAMBER / A4 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
Regional Editor 



The Illinois Environmental 
Protection Agency is planning to 
host a public hearing later this fall or 
early next year on two proposed 
developments In the Antioch area* 

The hearing was sought by two 
Lake County Board members Judy 
Martini (R-Antioch) and Suzi 
Schmidt (R-Lake Villa), in response 
to resident concerns over the devel- 
opments. 

One of the proposed develop- 
ments is an 80 acre parcel of land at 
die comer of Beach Grove Road and 
Route 59. Developers of me nearby 
Heron Harbor subdivision would 
like to build 160 homes on the site 
and are seeking to have the property 
annexed into the Village of Antioch. 

The oilier Is a proposed Industri- 
al park located near Loon Lake and 



the Northern Illinois Conservation 
Club on Route 83 near Grim Road, 
according to Martini 

Martini said there have been 
land use and environmental 
questions raised by residents about 
the two sites, and that's why she and 
Schmidt soughtthe public hearing. 

"1 represent both the village and 
unincorporated areas and the 
people In die unincorporated area 
say they want a voice and they want 
their concerns addressed. This will 
give them an opportunity to have 
their concerns heard," Martini said. 

"The purpose of the hearing is to 
allow all parties a chance to state 
their case," she added. 

Martini said she just' received a 
confirmation notice from the 1EPA 
that the hearing had been granted. 
Although an exact date or location 

Please see HEARING t A3 



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October 1, 1999 






COMMUNITY 



- ' ■ 



i 



> 



I 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



Fund-raiser benefits 

a research 




By CAROLYN LYNCH | 
Staff Reporter 



Advocates for Fibromyalgia 
Funding, Treatment, Education and 
Research (AFFTER) and Choosey 
Child, both located in Antioch, are 
conducting a fund-raising raffle to 
benefit fibromyalgia education and 
research. 

Fybromyalgia Is a disorder 
which is poorly understood and dif- 
ficult to treat. It Is a syndrome of de- 



bilitating, chronic, widespread pain, 
fatigue, sleep disturbance and other 
associated disorders. 

Raffle Items will be on display at 
Choosey Child In Antioch through 
Oct 30. Tickets are$3 each or3 for $5 
and can be purchased by calling 
AFFTER at 395-5123. 

AFFTER is hosting an educa- 
tional seminar Oct. 9 at the Col- 
lege of Lake County In Grayslake. 
For more Information, call 395- 
5272. 



FROM PAGE Al 



HEARING: Concerns heard 



hasn't been established, it will likely 
be held during the evening hours at 
Emmons School, she said. 

John Williams, hearing officer for 
the IEPA, said tentative plans arc to 
hold a pro-hearing conference 
sometime in early November and a 
final hearing next January or Febru- 
ary. 

Williams said since the matter Is 
a "contested case," different parties 



will have the opportunity to give 
their Input in a forum similar to a 
courtroom proceeding. At the end of 
the process, the IEPA will render Its 
findings or conclusions. 

Williams said he has not yet seen 
any documentation as to the issues 
or concerns surrounding the pro- 
posed developments. 

"Right now, we haven't even 
started the process yet,'" he said. 




Village zoning board 
adjusting meetings 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 

The\VilIag<! of Antioch Planning 
and Zoning Board will have an easi- 
er meeting schedule In the near fu- 
ture. 

Following the recommendation 
of the Village Attorney Ken Clark, the 
wording of the zoning board's re- 
quirement to meet monthly is being 
changed. Instead of the meetings 
needing to be held, the new wording 
has the meetings required to be 
scheduled monthly. . 

The new language will allow the 
chairman of the board the option of 
canceling the meeting or adjourning 
it to a different date. This can be 



done if the board chairman is aware 
ill ere will not be a quorum of the four 
members, or if there Is nothing on 
the agenda for them to discuss. 

"This saves the board members 
coming in for a meeting if there is 
nothing on the agenda to hold the 
meeting for," explained Village 
Trustee Dorothy Larson, who served 
as mayor pro-temp at the Sept. 20 
board meeting due to the absence of 
Mayor Marilyn Shlneflug and Village 
Administrator Tim Wells, both of 
whom were out of the village at a 
meeting. 

The zoning board previously ap- 
proved the change in a 4-0 vote fol- 
lowing a Sept. 9 public hearing on 
the matter. 




Depot Street road construction progress In downtown Antioch 
continues.— Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 



Antioch News 



Founded 1B86 



U«nb*r ol HniM Ptmi Anoc 

Look tor us on the Intemetlat 
WWW.LPNEWS.COU 



Vol 1 14 No. 40 A Lakeland Newspaper 

(USPS 027-000) Ed*xu(Ortc» 

30 South Whitney St., Grayalake, IL 60030 
(847) 223-61 01. 

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0*wlSthtU*»0« 



WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



tot uuier 



UNDASHIPMAN 

ptfte MaSo* U**ow 



NEAL TUCKER 
CHRIS MOm** 



Craft show 

rlmnnih,ml nt c l ? r 7. Dussault shops during the Peddler's Alley Craft Show at Antioch 
tonoy Bnssnw ** ** SCh ° 0, ' S StUdent Assistant Program.-Phoro oy 



Over 100 items available 
at Antioch Rotary auction 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



It is time for a great pork chop 
barbecue dinner and "Auction of the 
Century." 

The traditional fall Antioch Ro- 
tary Club Pork Chop Barbecue Din- 
ner and Auction will be held Satur- 
day, Oct 2 at St Peter's Father Han- 
ley Center in Antioch. 

Dinner will be served 5-7 p.m. 
with the live and silent auctions 



scheduled for 7-10 p.m. 

According to Larry Bersie, auc- 
tion committee chairman, there will 
be over 100 items available for bid in 
the live auction, and over 75 in the 
silent auction. 

Persons wishing to donate items 
for either auction can contact 
Colleen Conarchy 395-2500 or any 
Rotarian, 

Tickets are $15 which Includes 

dinner and admission to the auc- 

: tions. Plans are to have sold the 400 



raffle tickets at $50 each for the 2000 
Harley Davidson Sportster motorcy- 
cle. 

Both auction tickets and raffle 
tickets are available from Rotarians 
or at The Advertiser, First N ational \ 
Bank-Employee Owned or State 
Bank of the Lakes. Tickets will be 
available at the door. 

In the past 10 years, Antioch Ro- 
tary has raised over $650,000 used for 
various community program dona- 
tions and scholarship funds. 



Scouts enjoy 

Can't beat fun at the 'ole hill. 
That's the case for the 
Scouts of Antioch Cub 
Scout Pack 190. About 30 
Cubs enjoyed an afternoon of soap 
box derby racing down Hillside Dri- 
ve behind Ace Hardware and the 
cemetery. 

Complete with Wllmot Speed- 
way Official Starter John Newton of 
Spring Grove doing the starts, over 
30 "races" took place. Complete 
with occasional "bumping" of com- 
petitors and excursions off the track 
into groups of parents and relatives, 
along with stops in the weeded 
roadsides, plenty of excitement, 
thrills and a few tense moments for 
moms and dads were provided. 

Who won? Who knows? Who 
cares? The winners were aH of the 
young men who came away with 
smiles and the memories of a posi- 
tive, fun filled, family oriented 
event 



fun 




OUR 
TOWN 

Michael H.Babicz 



phone 838-0103. 



The Chain of Lakes Communi- 
ty Bible Church is hosting Celebra- 
tion Sunday and Tailgate Food Fest 
beginning at 10 a.m. Oct. 3 at the 
Church grounds on Grass Lake 
Road, just east of Route 59. Per- 
sons choosing to not be part of the 
tailgate are asked to park at Oak- 
land Grade School, located on the 
northwest corner of Grass Lake 
and Deep Lake Roads. The church 
will provide a shuttle service. 
Nursery and children's service will 
be available during the regular 
worship service. For information. 



Antioch Rotary Club along 
with Antioch Masonic Temple, An- 
tioch Moose Lodge, Antioch Lions, 
Antioch Womans dub, Antioch Ju- 
nior Wbmans dub and Northern 
Illinois Conservation Club is spear- 
heading a community blood drive9 
a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16 at the 
Moose Club on Route 173 in Anti- 
och. 

"It's most vital today because 
it's maintaining more and more 
people's livelihood," said BUI Stan- 
ley, Rotarian and Rotary blood drive 
chairman. There's always a blood 
shortage throughout the United 
Stales." 

If you have interesting informa- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for "Our 
Town" call staff reporter Mike 
Babicz at 223-8161, exL 138ore- 
mail, edit @lnd.com," 



INDEX 



Business — C6 
Classified .... C12 

County -......-. CI 

Crossword ..,..84 
Etfitorisl .~— . C4 
fatal Sac ..013 
Herttwotcn 811 



Homa/QardenB14 
Horoscope ,...B2 
Hot Spots —.88 
|Qd*s Homer „J6 
LakeWo ._.... 61 

Obitu&ftes ***** Co 



GET CONNECTED 
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ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC 

SPINAL EXAM 
AND X-RAYS 

^ ^£ (With this coupon. Ife ^^ 
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* (847) 740-2800 m 

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L Expires 10/31/99. 



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A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



October 1,1999 



FROM PAGE Al 



REUNION: Classes reunite after 50 years 



preparation being done in the past 
year. 

"We had many committee meet- 
ings on Chris (Reckers) pontoon 
boat," Coia said. "Chris drove the boat 
while the women ate along with doing 
die planning and the men talked." 

Committee members in addition 
to Coia include Bob Scott, who was 
the original senior class president; 



Vema (Kufalk) Holem, class treasurer; 
Ernie January, Mfl class Senior vice 
president; Joan (Smoc) Stretch, Bcv 
(Lasco) Reckers, whose husband pro- 
vided the meeting (boat) place, Arlenc 
(Malm) Nielsen, Tom Poulos and Don 
Holem. Former Antioch Mayor Ray 
Toft and his wife, Joan(Conrad) have 
helped by providing a garage for con- 
strucUon of the float and the wagon it 



is being built on. 

"The women did all of the plan- 
ning, now the men are finally work- 
ing, "Strcich added. 

An icebreaker is planned for 7-9. 
p.m. Friday, Oct 1 at the Best West- 
em Hotel on Route 173 in Antioch. 

"Anyone Is welcome to come, no 
matter what class they arc from," said 
Coia. 




Come Worship With Us 

I MHrectory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Graecland Baptist Church. 250 Ida SI , Antioch. IL 
Sunday School 11am., M« ring Worship Mom., 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams. Pastor. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist A Reading Rm. Re 173 and 
Harden, Antioch. Phono (W7) 395-1196. Sunday School, 
Sunday Church Scrwcc 10 30am, Wednesday, 7.30pm, 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Parkway, 
Antiocn, Phono (M7) 2657450 Sunday Worship at 9am. Sunday 
School, H>gh School A Addi ftbto Classes 1030am, 

St Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Man St Phono (047) 39&OGS2. Low 
Mass 730nm , 1 kgh Mass 930am Sunday School & Nursoy 930am 

Anlirjch Evangelical Fr« Church, 750 Highvww Or. Phono 
(847) 395-4117. Saturday Evening Service 5 30 pm Sunday 
School 9 45am, Sunday Wbrshp 30. 1 1:00, Children's Church 
1 1am Nursery bom services Awana Club Soma Pastor David M. 
Groktau. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church (ELCA). 1 1 55 rUsido Ave. Phono 
(847) 395-3359 Sunday Worship. B 4 9.30am Rev. Robert 
Trondet, Interim Pastor. 

Christisn Ule Fellowship Assemblies ol God Church. 41625 
Deep Lake Rd , Antioch. Phono (847) 395-8572. Sunday School 
(at ages) 9am. Sunday Momng Worsrup 10am.. Children's 
Church 10am, Sunday Everwvj Worship &30pm. Wednesday 
Worship & ChWron s Program 7am . Tuos Women* Fellowship & 
awe Study 9-1 130am. Jctl Brussafy. Pastor. 



Filth Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St., Phono 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 4 10.30am , Sunday 
School 9:25am , Sal. 7pm., Rev. Orogory Hermanson, 
Pastor. Christian Day School (847) 395-1664. 



Mlllbum Congregational United Church of Chrlsl. Grass 
Lake Fid. al Rio. 45. Phone (647) 356-5237. Sunday Sermco 
10am. Children's Program 10am Pev. Paut R. Mclliw, Pastor 

United Methodist Church ol Antioch. 848 Main SL Phono 
(847) 395-1259. Worship 830 & 10am„ Fellowship Time 
9 30am; Sunday School 10am Rev. Kurt A. Gamfm. Pastor. 

SI. Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St.. Anlioch Phono (847) 
3950274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 6.30. 8. 
9 30. 1 1 :30am & Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. 
Anglim. Pastor. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W, Grass 
Lake Rd . Antioch. Phono (847) 8386-103. Sunday Worship 0.15 
and 1045 Sunday School 9.45. CMdren's Church 10.45.Vbum, 
Women's. Awana & Small Group mnstnes- Pastor, Pout 
Mc M rimy 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave (Rle. 59 * 132), Lake Villa, (847) 356- 
5158. Sunday Worship 8 15 4 10:45am; Sunday School (3 
and up) and BitJo Study 9 30am. Christian Preschool, Pev 
John Zoiimer, Pastor. 




Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



^timatif C3 Ate y£>h\f$Lclan$ in -/\ntiock 



Erin C. Davis, MD 

BOARD-CERTIFIED IN INTERNAL MEDICINE 

"I enjoy listening to, and workjng with my patients, 

in getting to the root of a problem. 

By working together, wc can find the solution.* 1 



Associated with the following McHenry-based 
Centegra Primary Care internists: 

James Mowcry, MD Jcffcry Gindorf, MD . 
James Skopcc, MD Susan Ignatius, MD 
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CHAMBER: Seeks more 
industrial involvement 



the Chamber," Porch said. "We've 
had some preliminary meetings with 
industry and one or our goals Is to 
help move the process of their in- 
volvement along," 

"Wq want to be their voice," 
added Palmer, relating to issues with 
village ordinances and other com- 
munity issues. 

Porch and Palmer arc in agree- 
ment to work with John Ruffin, 
membership chairman, to expand 
the Chamber's roster which is above 
200 presently. 

The creation of Porch's position, 
one which she has held since ap- 
proximately Sept. 1 when she re- 
signed her post as Chamber presi- 
dent, Is to provide more continuity 
and elevate some of the burden of 
various event chairpersons. 

Having worked as a child grow- 
ing up in the family business, The 
General Store, a gift shop located In 
the same building as Porch's current 
business, she has been around Anti- 
och all of her life. For the past nine 
years, Porch has been active in the 
Chamber having served on the board 
for the post five ye'ars. 

Prior to that, Porch was involved 
with Community Action Now(CAN), 
which was a separate Organization 
prior to its becoming part of the 
Chamber. 

"I'd like to see the Chamber con- 
tinue in the same positive direction 
which it has been over the past three 
years," Porch said. 

The addition of an executive di- 
rector, a part-time position which 
has no set hours, allows the Cham- 
ber to provide more continuity In its 
programs and events. 

"Every two years, there's a slight 
change on the board of directors," 
Porch explains. "The new position 
will help insure continuity and main- 
tain the movement in a positive di- 
rection." 

Porch, as executive director, will 
work with the chairperson of each 
event, assisting them in whatever 
ways she can. "It takes a lot of the 




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burden off the chairs when they 
don't have to do oil of the coordinat- 
ing for their event," Porch said. 

"I'll make sure the coordinating 
gets done and will work with the of- 
fice to help insure that things get 
done, then report back to the chairs," 
Porch explained. 

The flexibility of the position Is 
due to different things needed to be 
done outside of a regular business 
day, on weekends, in the evenings, or 
on Porch's days off from her regular 
business. 

"Events always exceed the nor- 
mal business hours," Porch admits. 
"There's a lot of planning and devel- 
opment which goes on behind the 
scenes for all of the events." 

Palmer, a Chamber board mem- 
ber for the past five years, serving the 
last two as first vice president and 
' moving Into the presidency upon 
Porch's resignation to take the new 
post. Palmer also comes from a 
background of being a native of An- 
tioch with her familyhaving run An- 
tioch Supply Plumbing and Heating 
for many years. 

"Whether the new position 
works or not will be measured by 
productivity," Palmer explained of 
Porch's post. "If the events grow 
and the total membership grows, 
then it worked. We'll know the suc- 
cess by the events and the mem- 
bership." 

Both Palmer and Porch are in 
agreement, the idea of the executive 
director is To maintain some conti- 
nuity. The board changes directors, 
usually two or three per year. This 
year, in December, there will be six 
positions. Palmer intends to run for 
re-election. In addition, Porch's po- 
sition allows for more visibility by the 
Chamber in case board members or 
the president ore unable to attend on 
event. 

"It's hard to get board members 
and volunteers for events," Palmer 
explains. "I was chairman of the 
Taste of Antioch, and I had to coor- 
dinate the restaurants, entertain- 
ment, garbage service, and those 
type of things." 

"With Barbara's position, now 
the person chairing the event can 
meet with her, identify what needs 
to be done, and have some help in 
seeing it gets done, rather than 
somebody walking up to them and 
handing them a folder with a bunch 
of papers In it and saying, have 
fun," Palmer, whose regular posi- 
tion is assistant vice president of 
real estate lending at State Bank of 
the Lakes. 

All of the information on the 
backgrounds of the events, contacts, 
etc., will be maintained through the 
Chamber office. 






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ACCIDENT: 

Woman dies in 
boating crash 

•* 

minor injuries. 

Peterson was a member of the St 
Peter Catholic Church in Antioch. 
She is survived by her husband 
Richard Peterson, whom she mar- 
ried on Nov. 4, 1989; sons, Ryan and 
Drew; parents Dennis and Beverly 
Howard, Sharon (Perry) and Dennis 
Howard; sister, TerryLynn (Daniel) 
Witt;; mother and father-in law, 
James and Joyce Peterson; brother- 
in-law, Allen (Christie) Peterson; un- 
cle, Donald Howard; and many 
nieces and nephews. 

A funeral mass will be held Oct 1 
at 11 a.m. at St. Peter Catholic 
Church, Antioch. Family and mends 
may visit orfiUp^ 3 ^ 6 to 8 p.m. at 
strmne Funeral Chapel & Crematori- 
um, 410 E Belvidere Rd., Grayslake. 
In lieu of flowers, donations may be 
sent to the Peterson family for edu- 
cation of their children. 



October!, 1999 



POLICE & FIRE 






i 



1 






• 



Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 



17 in custody after latest 
county warrant sweep 



Lake County Sheriff Gary Del Re 
announced the results of the most 
recent in ongoing efforts of the Sher- 
iffs Office to aggressively serve war- 
rants on persons wanted by the court 
for various violations of civil con- 
tempt orders. 

The latest warrant operation oc- 
curred between the hours of 3 and 1 1 
p.m. on Sept. 17. 

The operation was conducted by 
the Like County Sheriffs Office Civ- 
il Process Division, with assistance 
from the Sheriff s Warrants Division. 
Deputies from both divisions were 
divided into five, two-man teams to 
enhance the effectiveness of the ef- 
fort. The teams focused their atten- 
tion on the northeast area of Lake 
County. 

The sweep resulted in the appre- 
hension of nine people on Sept. 17. 
In addition/a total of eight people 
self-surrendered at the Lake County 
Sheriffs Office In Waukegan as of 5 
p.m. Sept. 20. 

A department spokesman said it 
is believed additional persons will 
surrender themselves to the Sheriffs 
Office as a result of this sweep. 

Sheriff Del Re said that the main 
objective of the random, sweep Is 
the arrest of persons wanted on civil 
warrants, also known as body at- 
tachments. 



"Judges issue body attachments 
for such violations as failure to ap-. 
pear in a criminal case, falling to 
make an appearance in civil court, 
such as small claims, or, for failing to 
make child support payments," said 
Del Re. 

Names and addresses of persons 
arrested on Sept. 17, and those who 
surrendered on Sept. 20, Include: 

Johnnie Barnes, 712 S. Jacksoni 
Waukegan; Erica Carter, 1701 Bar- 
rett Ctr., North Chicago; Faustino 
Diaz, 1008 Bth St., Waukegan; 
Phillip Moore, Jr., 1701 16th St., 
North Chicago; William Nleml, 43 
N. Elmwood, Waukegan; Felicia 
Smith, 1107 S. Elmwood, 
Waukegan; Cynthia Turner, 1312 
Melrose Ave., #208, Waukegan; 
Carter Williams, 200 S. Utlca St., 
Waukegan; Paul Winter, 1422 Lau- 
rel Ave., Waukegan. 

Those who surrendered are: 
Sharon Ates, 1026 Lenox Ave., #3, 
North Chicago; Hiroko Burgess, 1209 
Blackburn St., Gumee; David Gun- 
derman, 2607 Gideon, Zion; April 
Hicks, 1707 Barrett Ct., #B, North 
Chicago; Maribel Londono, 37864 N. 
Wadsworth Rd., Wadsworth; Betty, 
Mitchell, 21 10 Wright. North Chica- 
go; Pat Roberts, 38688 Bayonne Ave., 
Wadsworth; Julie Lacy, 2931 27th St, 
#207, Zion. 



POLICE BEAT 

Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty In acourtoflaur. 



ANTIOCH 



No valid license 

Kenneth C Rogers, 34, of Ami- 
och was stopped by Ant loch Police 
at 1:07 a.m. Sept. 23 and charged 
with driving with no valid license, 
speeding and having no rear regis- 
tration light. 

LAKE VILLA 

Driving while license 
suspended 

Richard Chobat, 20, or Lake Vil- 
la was pulled over bn Sept. 22 after 
a police officer ran his plates and 
realized the owner of the car had a 
suspended license. The officer 
found a package of fireworks in the 
back seat of Chobot's car. 

The officer confiscated the fire- 
works and had Chobot's vehicle 
towed. 



Chobot was charged with 
driving with a suspended dri- 
ver's license and driving an 
uninsured vehicle. He received 
a verbal warning for the fire- 
works. r 

Chobot was transported to 
the Lake Villa Police Department 
for processing and was released 
on a $2,0001 Bond. 




Captain Sam Frankson of the Antloch Fire Department cleans up a pumper-tanker truck to be tak- 
en to the department's new station on Deep Lake Road, which opens Oct. 3.— Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



Maplethorpe fire station to be dedicated Oct 3 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Dedication ceremonies for the 
second Antioch Fire Department 
District 1 station are scheduled for 
Sunday afternoon, Oct 3. 

The new station, to be named af- 
ter retired chief Tod Maplethorpe, Is 
located on Deep Lake Road just 
north of Depot Street on the village's 
east side. 

Among those planning to attend 
are Congressman Phillip Crane, An- 
tioch Mayor Marilyn Shinefl ug along 
with Maplethorpe, his wife, Carol, 
"and many of their family members. 

Other local village, township and 



fire district officials have been invit- 
ed, along with various state legisla- 
tive representatives. 

An open house will be held at 
the station 1230-4 p.m. The actual 
dedication ceremony will be at 130 
p.m. 

The Lake County Community 
Band will play from 1230-130 p.m. 
A Flight for Life helicopter demon- 
stration Is scheduled for 2:15 p.m. . 

State Fire Marshall Mitch Kush- 



er is scheduled to bring his K-9 for a 
demonstration. Various fire preven- 
tion demonstrations are planned. 

Cake and coffee will be served. 

The event marks the beginning 
of Fire Prevention Week Oct. 3-9. An- 
tioch Fire Department personnel will 
be visiting all elementary schools 
within its fire district and lalkingwuh 
all students ages K-S throughout the 
week. Monday through Friday, OcL 
4-8. 



To give us HOT NEWS TIPS 

call Lakeland Newspapers at 223-8073 

You can leave your name and number or remain anonymous. 
Leave a message and we'll check it out! 



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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



October 1, 1999 



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS 



Marine Corps 

Zbtgnlew I. Wl erzchoH teckl , 

son of lacek and Marzenna Wicrz- 
chowiccki of Antioch, recently com- 
pleted basic training at Marine Corps 
Recruit Depot. 

Degree 

Jennifer Ann Von Alstyne of 

Antioch received a degree from LSU. 

Dean's List 

Jamie Sobie of Antioch has 
been appointed to the Dean's List at 
Columbia College, Chicago. 

Shawn Hansen, son of valeric 
Hansen and Jon Hansen has been 
named to the Dean's List at 
Lawrence University. 

The University of Wisconsin- 
Parkside has announced the names 
of Antioch students who have earned 
Dean List honors: Annellese C 
Boehm, Rhonda M. Garwood, 
Cindy L, Kuechle, Lisa M. 



Sprague. 

Courtney Konrath of Antioch 
has been named to the Dean's List at 
the University of Dubuque. Konrath 
is the daughter of John and Dianne 
Konrath. 

Jamie N. Hope of Antioch has 
been named to the Dean's List at Au- 
gustana College. 

Air Force 

Melissa K. Doyle has graduat- 
ed from basic military training at 
Lackland Air force Dasc. She is the 
daughter of Patricia J. Slavik. 

Degree 

Jamie Marie Davis of Antioch 
received a degree from University of 
Wisconsin at Parkside, 

Honored 

Klmberly B. Ilollgren , of An- 
tioch is being honored for attaining 
high grade point averages. 



LOCAL DIGEST 




Trick or treat 

Young people within the village 
limits of Antioch will have the oppor- 
tunity to trick or treat from 3-6 p.m. 
Sunday, Oct 31 in recognition of Hal- 
loween. Village Clerk Candi Rowe 
made die recommendation of the 
hours to die board following a tele- 
phone survey of area communities. 

Lions say thanks 

The Antioch Lions Club, 
through president Jack Miller, ex- 
pressed appreciation to the village 
officials of Antioch and lo the pub- 
lic works department employees for 
their assistance in the Lions Club 
Barbecue and Rescue Squad Auc- 
tion this summer. 

Full status officers 

The Village of Antioch has two 



additional full status full time police 
officers. The village board unani- 
mously voted to change Officer 
John Laskowski and Officer Dennis 
Gornowich from probationary to 
full time status. The move was with 
the recommendation of Police 
Chief Charles Watkins. 

Library hosts speaker 

The Antioch Public Library will 
host Nancy Burgess, a local histori- 
an, giving a slide presentation on 
the Barns of Lake County at 7 p.m. 
Monday, Oct. A in the library meet- 
ing room. Burgess will have infor- 
mation on existing and former 
barns, as well as stories regarding 
some of these present and former 
landmarks. To register to attend, 
contact the library circulation desk 
39S-0B74. 



An 'excellent' teacher 

W.C. Petty School fourth grade teacher Sue Stevens, who recently received an EXCEL teaching 
award, talks with student Trevor Gamlin during class Sept. 24.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Lindenhurst residents 
to have it 'their way' 

Burger King coming to Eagle Center 




By MICHAEL H.BAB1CZ 
Community Editor 



Youth Sports 



Wo Want to report on your local teams Please call John ptiolps at 2238161 



Next spring, lindenhurst resi- 
dents will be able to have it their way. 

Burger King is coming to die Ea- 
gle Ridge Shopping Center at Munn 
Road and Grand Ave. 

The village board unanimously 
passed site plan, architectural, land- 
scaping, signage and special use re- 
quests from Randy Imhoff, subcon- 
tractor for the franchisee, who will be 
in charge of construction at the site. 



The Burger King will be located at 
the northeast corner of Munn and 
Grand, on lot four of the Eagle Ridge 
subdivision in the Eagle planned unit 
development. The restaurant will 
front Grand Avenue, wilh its main en- 
trance facing cast toward Eagle's 
parking area. 

Imhoff has constructed similar 
restaurants for Burger King in 
Grayslake and McHenry. 

One change for the sign plans al- 
ready unanimously approved by the 
village plan commission is a new logo 



which Burger King has released. 
Imhoff Intends to return to die com- 
mission with the design and other in- 
formation regarding the logo and 
where it will be located on the building 

Construction is expected to begin 
within the next month wiUi a sched- 
uled opening sometime in. early 
spring. 

"1 remember back not too many 
years, and Trustee Jim Betustak was 
on the board at the time, when the vil- 
lage brought in its first McDonald's," 
Mayor Paul Baumunk said. "We share 
that same excitement with the first 
Burger King coming to town." 



> 



IT S QUICK. IT'S EASY. 
IT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE. 

Mammography Services Now Available at 
Victory Outpatient Services, Lindenhurst 



A mammogram can help detect a tumor in its 

earliest stages, when it's most treatable. It takes 

only a few minutes and it could save your life, And 

now, you can have your mammogram performed at 

Victory's new state-of-the-art, Lindenhurst facility. 

Breast Cancer Awareness Month Special 

From October 1-31, 1999, receive a special 
discount on routine screening mammograms. 
Cost: $60, plus (he $30 radiologist interpretation fee. 



Call (847) 360-4184 to schedi lk. 



When scheduling, please state at which Victory 

facility* you'd like to have your mammogram performed. 

Saturday appointments available. Only women age 35 

and older with no known breast problems are 

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Viclary Outpatient Services is located in the 

Victory Surgery ami Treatment Center, 

1050 Red Oak Lane, Urulenhurst, Illinois 

(on tlte Victory l/iies Campus 

-off Grand Avenue) 




*This special discount is also available October 1-31, 1999, at Victory Memorial Hospital, 
Waukegan, and Victory Health Care Center, Grayslake. Call (847) 360-4184 to schedule... 



Check with your insur- 
ance provider about the 
need for prccertification 
and/or referral. 

Victory Outpatient 

Services accepts the 

following managed 

care plans: 

Beech Street: PPO 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

or Illinois: HMOl, 

Blue Advantage, 

MCNP, PPO (pending} 

CAPP Care Inc.; PPO 

Cigna: PPO, POS, HMO 
(pending) 

Corvel Corporation: PPO 

Evolutions Healthcare: PPO 
(pending) 

Health Dynamics: PPO 

Heajth Preferred of 
• Mid-America: PPO 

Healthcare's Finest Network: 
PPO 

HealthStar, Inc.; PPO 

v 

Humana HealthCarc Plans: 
PPO, POS, HMO (pending) 

One Health Plan: PPO 

Private Healthcare Systems: 
PPO' 

Prcfcrrcd Plan, Inc.: PPO 

State of Illinois Employer 
Group: PPO 

United HealthCarc: - 
PPO, POS, HMO (pending) 

WcllmarkHeallh 
Network, Inc.: PPO 




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NEIGHBORS 




NEIGHBORS 

Name: Dawn Chclmecki 

Home: Unincorporated Antioch 

Occupation: Owner, Double D Col- 
lectibles, Fox Lake 

I'm originally from: Chicago 

I graduated from: Schurz High 
School, College of Lake County 

My family consists of: Husband, 
Donald; children, Connor, age 6 amnd 
Jessica, age 8 

My pets are: Three dogs, four cats, eight parrots. 

What I (Ike best about my neighborhood: Good to raise chil- 
dren—you don't have to worry about traffic. 

What I like best about my job: 1 enjoy being with my cus- 
tomers. I have missed them in the week of opening the store. 

The secret to my success: Working 14 hour days and great 
customers 

I relax by: Reading, gardening, painting 
Last book I read: The Green Mile" by Stephen King 
Favorite TV program: "X Files- 
Favorite movie Is: Anything by Disney , 
Favorite music: Rock 'n roll 
My (He's motto is: Life is too short. 
If I won the lottery, I would: Pay bills, take a vacation. 
My greatest accomplishments are: My children. 
I want to be remembered as: A good person. 

People who knew me In high school would say: lhavc 
changed a lot 

My pet peeve is: Rude people. 

If I could meet anyone, I would meet: Susan B. Anthony 

My dream Job would be: I have it. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: China 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profited In 
this column, call Neat Tucker at 223-8161. 



To give u« HOT NEWS TIPS 
call Lakeland Newspapers at 223-8073 

You can leave your name and number or remain anonymous. 
Leave a message and we'll check It out! 



Don't let the 
flu bug you. 

Stop in to take advantage of our 
special $10 rate for flu shots. : 

• JUesdays and Thursdays 
8am to 10pm 
October 1 - December 1 

• Must be 18 years or older. 

• No appointment is necessary. 

We will invoice Medicare Part B when eligible. 



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Member of Condell Health Network • ww*c6nJelI.org 
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6440 Grand Ave. 

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680-0500 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS 



College 

Rose Kenny of Antioch won't 
say goodbye to all her childhood 
treasures when she takes tip resi- 
dence at Southern Illinois University 
Carbondale as a freshman planning 
to major in elementary education. 
Rose's sister, 3 -year-old Anna, gives 
her sister a hand with the important 
cargo. 

Scholars 

Oernadlne E. Cerbes and 
Ryan A. Gamlln of Antioch 
have been named to the Presi- 
dent's List scholars from North 
Central College. 

Dean's list 

Colin Dent, Michael Kelly, 
Lisa Schaefer, Jane steff enburg 
and Russell Todd of Antioch. have 
been named to the Dean's Ust at 
University of Illinois. 



Degrees 

Kelly EwnJt, Jennifer Hovcy, 
and Susan Zulker of Antioch, 
have received degrees from the 

University of Illinois, 

Army 

Jonathan D. Jordan of Anti- 
och is at Fort Knox , Ky„ to com- . 
pletc basic combat training. He is 
the son of KImberly Jordan of Anti- 
och. 

Graduation 

Amanda L Foster of Antioch 
has earned a degree at Purdue Uni- 
versity. 

Dean's List 

Laura L Deutsch, Matthew 
E. Fleming, Josh ua I. Mack and 
Michael YV. Nielsen of Antioch 
have been named to the Dean's List 
at NIU college. 



Course teaches tablesetting 



Beauty is in the eye of the be- 
holder, and with so many holi- 
days this season, you want every 
eye to behold a beautiful table- 
setting to enhance the bountiful 
harvest you place before family 
and guests. Learn the art of table- 
setting, on Sept. 29, starting at 
6:30 p.m., at the University of Illi- 
nois Extension auditorium, on 
Highway 45, just past Route 120 
in Grayslake. A $5 entry fee covers 
refreshments. 

Theme baskets, filled with 
coffees, cheeses, wines, teas, bath 
items and other special items on 
your most wanted Ust, wil I be giv- 
en away as door prizes during the 
evening. 

"Tablesetting has become a 
lost art," said Jane Keroson, pres- 
ident of the Lake County Assoc! a- 
' tlon for Home and Community 
Education. "Yet a well set tabic, 
with a theme, can bring a family 
together for an evening of flowing 
conversation after a trying day at 
work and school." Keroson 
added, "We talk about how fami- 
lies that eat together get together. 
This is- a good way of doing just 



that." 

Lake County Association for 
Home and Community Education 
members will display tableset- 
tings in five categories: Pretty, 
Clever, Holiday, Children's, and 
Miniature. Members will be avail- 
able to answer your questions 
about how each item comple- 
ments every other item on the 
table, how the tablesetting relates 
to the theme and where to find 
the materials to create these mar- 
velous settings. 

You will be part or the judging 
and choose which tables meet 
your critical best. Professionals 
will also Judge the tables! The 
winning tables will receive your 
accolades. Of course, best of all, 
take the ideas for your tableset- 
ting best this season. A beautiful- 
ly set table enhances a meal, adds 
beauty to the room and home, 
and relieves tensions of the day 
for great conversations around 
-the dinner table. 

- Contact: Jane Ellen Keroson, 
president of LCAHCE at 265-5620 
for program and membership in- 
formation. 






More Choices In Cruising Hawaii 

by JIM WARNKEN, President, North Star Travel, inc. 

You may recall an earlier story I wrote in which I explained that due to an 
outdated maritime law dating back to the 1800s, your choice of cruise lines sailing 
among the Hawaiian Islands is limited to American Hawaiian Cruise Lines. 

Briefly, this restricts ships sailing from one U.S. port to another U.S. port, to 
American Flag carrying vessels. One of the requirements to be an American Flag 
carrying vessel is that it must have been built in the U.S. Since there arc currently no 
shipyards in the U.S. manufacturing passenger-carrying ocean liners, and the only one 
still in service is owned by American Hawaiian Cruises, they pretty much have a lock 
on the Hawaiian market. f 

However, a foreign flag vessel can leave from a foreign port (i.e. Canada or 
Mexico) and visit the Hawaiian Islands. 

That's exactly what many cruise lines do twice a year when they reposition their 
ships to and from summer's sailing in Alaska, to the Caribbean for the winter. 

For instance, Carnival Cruise Lines shijf, the Jubilee, will be sailing from 
Enscnada, Mexico to Honolulu on April 17 of next year. Along the way the Jubilee 
will spend a day in Hilo on the cast coast of the Island of Hawaii (also known as the 
"Big Island") and another at Kona on the west coast of the Big Island. The Jubilee 
will also dock at the island of Kauai for a day and spend another couple of days on the 
island of Maui before debarking at Honolulu on the 29th of April. 

If a Carnival cruise is not right for you, Princess Cruises, Royal Caribbean, 
Holland America and NCL offer similar repositioning cruises. Since the cruise lines 
have to get their ships to Alaska for the summer season anyhow, you've got a chance 
to take advantage of some great deals on just about any of these sailings. 

However, don't just go for the best price. This may sound a link self-serving, but 
it's important to find a good travel agent who not only knows their ships, but will take 
the time to get. to know you and your interests. Different cruise lines, and even 
different ships of the same cruise line, appeal to different people. Get on the right ship 
and you'll be planning your next, cruise before you dock. A cruise on the. wrong ship 
can turn you off to cruising forever. 



Calendar 



Friday, Oct. 1 

7 p.m., The Antioch Poetry Society, 
"Culture Shock of Antioch," holds 
live readings (first Fri. of every 
month) at Books Etc., 901 Main St 
Looking for readers, orig. or works 
of others. Call Patty at 395-4465 
or the store, 838-2665 

7:30 p.m., Lake County Camera 
Club meets at Warren Twp. Center 
Citizen Bldg. on Washington St. In 
Gumee, Info, at 856-1583 

• *H<lMl),l>i»lli>ilt>„l>,l.>iii,4i,>tllHI*4,t)tHtl*«»ltl4,-1».t 

Fri. & Sat 8 p.m., Sun. at 2:30 
p.m., PM&L Theatre, 877 Main 
Street In Antioch, presents the 
comedy "Broadway Bound" by Neil 
Simon. Tickets are SlO/adults, 
Sfl/students & srs., call 395-3055 

Saturday, Oct. 2 

9 a.m.-4 p.m., Prince of Peace 
Holiday Craft Fair held at 135 
Milwaukee Ave. (Rte. 132 & 83) in 
Lake Villa, with crafts, raffles, more 

Sunday, Oct. 3 

Noon, "Rock for the Wild," a 
benefit concert for JES Exotics 
Sanctuary (a haven for large cats 
and other animals who have been 
abused or abandoned) held at 
Main Street Inn, 225 E. Main SL 
in Round Lake Park. Music, food, 
raffles, prizes, $10 donation, for 
more info, or to make a donation, 
call JES at 414-736-9386 

The Lake County Women's 
Coalition hosts its Fifth Annual Tea 
Party at Midlane Country Club in 
Wadsworth. This year's event 
honors women writers and speak- 
ers wilt be women authors from 
the local area. Tickets are $15, 
call to purchase at 336-1795 

Monday, Oct. 4 

12:45 p.m.. Bingo at Antioch' 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

7 p.m.. Northwest Educational 
Group meets at Lake Villa Adminis- 
trative complex 

7 p.m., Antioch Garden Club 
meeting at Antioch Community 
Center, 884 Main SL Topic Is "Fall 

Garden Care," call 395-9100 

„ * 



6:45 p.m., Bingo at Antioch 
Moose Lodge, Rte. 173, 2 miles 
West of Antioch, info, at 395-9780 



7 p.m., Lakes Area Comm. Band 
at ACHS, information at 395-6729 

Tuesday, Oct. 5 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
doors open 4:30 p.m., 395-5393 



****** 




STAR 



NORTH 



Lindenhurst 

www.northstartrav8l.coni 



(847) 356-2< 



• III 



7:30 p.m., St Peter Council of 
Catholic Women meet at parish 
hall, call 395-0274 

Wednesday, Oct. 6 

Sequoit Board of Directors meets 

6:30-8:15 p.m. AWANA Club (3 
yrs. thru 6th grade) meets at Anti- 
och Evangelical Free Church, for 
info, call 395-4117 

7-9 p.m., Northern Lake County 
Quitter's Guild meets at State Bank 
of the Lakes in Lindenhurst, for 
info, call Valerie at 838-2126 ■ 

,l,,, ( *.l*<«Hlt,MIM|H«*'**'«t*i»ltllM,H>"l»l««""** linn* 

Thursday, Oct. 7 

7 p.m., American Sewing Guild 
group "Running in Stitches meets 
at State Bank of the Lakes, 
Lindenhurst, call Janet at 265- 
7932 or Chris at 548-8223 



7-9 p.m., Homesellers Seminar, 
free, held at the Lake Villa Park 
Bldg., 37908 N. Fairfield Rd. in 
Lake Villa. Reservations and Info. 
at 573-1000 exL 226 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests* 
Call 223-8161 and ask for 
calendar assistance. 






A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



October 1, 1999 



The Phantom tooth fairy 
brings an unexpected gift 



The children arc at that age 
where we have had a rash 
of lost teeth. Most recently 
our second grader came 
out of school one afternoon toting 
her usual attire: a backpack, lunch 
box, and project-of-lhe-day, as well 
as a tittle red treasure chest in 
which one of her baby teeth rested. 

Seems right in the middle of 
math the tooth popped out. Now 
the day before, stretching for that 
"Mom ofThe Year Award," for a 
treat, I had put a Chug in her lunch 
box instead of the usual old juice 
box. Now for those of you going 
"huh," a Chug is nothing more than 
a cute container filled with overly 
chocolate, chocolate milk that not 
only conveniently fits in a lunchbox 
but is also making stockholders of 
Dean's a nice profit. 

Well the child had come-home 
from school with the Chug still in 
her lunch box minus only one sip. 
Seems one of the older students 
told this child that if you drink 
chocolate milk with a loose tooth in 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringte 



your mouth, your tooth will fall out 
and you will swallow it. 

That's all this second grader 
had to hear and the top went back 
on the bottle. She choked down the 
rest of her gooey peanut butter , 
sandwich without so much as a 
sample ofliquid. Upon hearing the 
story I told the child that was a 
bunch of hogwash and there had 
been no scientific research to back 
up the claim regarding chocolate 
milk and losing teeth. None the 
less, moms don't know as much as 
the third grader sitting across the 
lunch table. So the next morning 
the child begged me to put a juice 
box in her lunch box or else she 
would die of thirst during lunch, 



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Fax (847) 395-4232 





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Her wish is my command. This 
is the afternoon she came home ■ 
with her newly lost tooth in a red 
treasure chest, beaming that she 
was right all along and mom had 
no clue about the tooth business. 

Proved wrong once again by an 
8 year old. So after dinner, the tooth 
found its way into the tooth fairy 
pillow in anticipation for some big 
reward of monetary value. Well the 
resident tooth fairy, in the midst or 
preparing for the next day, com- 
pletely overlooked her tooth fairy 
duties and went to bed. 

The substitute fairy noticing the 
head guru shirked her duties, fum- 
bled in the darkened room to recti- 
fy the situation. Well much to the 
surprise of both tooth fairies, as the 
morning light filled the room, a S5 
"bill had replaced the tooth in the 
tooth pillow. 

Seems old second in command 
tooth fairy tried rectifying the situa- 
tion in an unlit room, without his 
much needed contact lenses, and 
misread the number on the curren- 
cy. 

Now all the kids at school want 
to sleep at our house when they 
lose their teeth. I think the substi- 
tute tooth fairy needs to leave some 
of those old accumulated baby 
teeth under his pillow and maybe 
the real tooth fairy will leave 
enough cash so he can have laser 
surgery on his eyes. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers will) information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 




To give us 

HOT NEWS TIPS 

call 
Lakeland Newspapers at 

223-8073 

You can leave your name 

and number or 

remain anonymous. 

Leave a message & 



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Antioch resident Susan Tanaschovsky shows off her traditional 
German garb as part of her preparations for- the 20th 
Oktoberfest, sponsored by the German American Club of 
Antioch. The event was held Sept. 25 at the Antioch VFW Hall.— 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 




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LIFE'S A BEAR 

Today's telephone 
technology answered /B2 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'Double Jeopardy': Don't 
give it a second glance 7B5 



KIDS KORNER 

Have fun learning with 
games & puzzles / B6 



pui X out 

SUCTION 




Section 




Lakeland Newspapers October 1-7, 1999 



Harvest o 






Other pick-your-own 

fruit orchards 

in the area: 



Qwgfs.Orchard 

500S.RL85 . 
(1/4 mile north of Midlothian Rd.) 
.Muhtfelefn b 

Featu res pj^ck-you^pWn 'atjjpleijj counti 



store, restaur^'!; baJftryTrait&ho 
and other holiday events. Open r 
Tucs. thru Sun*CaI1566-4520. 



Zieaer^rchard 

32303 PL Bacon Bd.; 
Gray: 




■ 



& 



C 











5 *• •' > 



■ - 



, 



' 




Features pick 

goods, 
I 




&ti*£l$'*tii : iy*£v&i!ib 



John Knight, 2, and William Kaplan, 3, both of 
Grayslake, take turns munching on freshly picked rasp- 
berries at Glunz Farms In Grayslake, where residents 



By ANGELA D. SYKORA 
Staff Reporter 






have been flocking every year around this time since 
1997. —Photo by Sandy Brenner 







It's the time of the season when the air 
gets crisp, the leaves begin to turn, 
and area fanners show off the fruits of 
their labor. The best of the fail harvest 
in not at the grocery store— it is still out- 
side, lingering on the vine, ripening to 
sweet perfection and waiting to be picked. 
At Gtunz Farms in Grayslake, the rasp - 
berries arc peaking, and with five acres of 
fruit to pick from, all that is left to do is 
grab a carton and stake out a good spot. 

Glunz Farms, family owned for gener- 
ations, offered its first harvest of raspber- - 
lies to the public in 1997. The locals come 
back every year like clockwork to get their 
fill. 

"It's the freshest Every berry is the ultimate berry," said regu- 
lar Carol McConnell, of Gumee, who stops in at least once a week 
to gather raspberries for herself and the staff of the Warren-New- 
port Library. 



Joseph Glunz, Jr. 
discusses the fresh 
raspberries offered 
at Glunz Farms. — 
Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



"We eat 'em like popcorn," she said. 

Glunz Farms grows a variety of raspberries including Autumn 
Bliss and Heritage. It was a good summer for them too, despite the 
lack of rain, said Joseph B. Glunz, Jr., vice president 

"We love drought situations." said Glunz, who explained how 
the farm has its own irrigation system that allows them to control 
how much water the raspberries receive. 

Last year, extreme humidity and wetness created mold that 
killed a third of their crop. This year, the berries are flourishing. 

Glunz credits their appeal with the fact that absolutely no pes- 
ticides are sprayed on the raspberries. 

"It's totally clean fruit— as close as you can get to nature," said 
Glunz. 

Another reason customers prefer their raspberries over those 
store-bought, said Glunz, is because store-bought raspberries have 
not been able to ripen naturally, and are therefore, not as sweet 
and delicious as they could be. 

"Our raspberries hang out on the vine until they're ripe; then 
they come off," he said. 

Glunz explained that grocers receive shipments of berries that 
were probably picked too early. 

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AS/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



October 1, 1999 



The Phantom tooth fairy 
brings an unexpected gift 



The children are ai that age 
where we have had a rash 
of lost lecth. Most recently 
our second grader came 
out of school one afternoon toting 
her usual attire: a backpack, lunch 
box, and project-of-the-day, as well 
as a little red treasure chest In 
which one of her baby teeth rested. 

Seems right in the middle of 
math the tooth popped out. Now 
the day before, stretching for that 
"Mom of The Year Award," for a 
treat, I had put a Chug in her lunch 
box instead of the usual old juice 
box- Now for those of you going 
"huh," a Chug is nothing more than 
a cute container Tilled with overly 
chocolate, chocolate milk that not 
only conveniently fits in a lunchbox 
but is also making stockholders of 
Dean's a nice profit. 

Well the child had come-home 
from school with the Chug still in 
her lunch box minus only one sip. 
Seems one of the older students 
told this child that if you drink 
chocolate milk with a loose tooth in 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

'Lynn Pringle 



your mouth, your tooth will fall out 
and you will swallow it. 

That's all this second grader 
had to hear and the top went back 
on the bottle. She choked down the 
rest of her gooey peanut butter , 
sandwich without so mucli as a 
sample of liquid. Upon hearing (he 
story I told the child that was a 
bunch of hogwash and there had 
been no scientific research to back 
up the claim regarding chocolate 
milk and losing teeth. None the 
less, moms don't know as much as 
the third grader sitting across the 
lunch table. So the next morning 
the child begged me to put a juice 
box in her lunch box or else she 
would die of thirst during lunch. 



BILLER PRESS 

"We're Your Type" 



Hours: 
Monday thru Friday 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Sat. 8 a.m. -12 p.m 



COMPLETE 
PRINTING SERVICE 



847/395-4111 

847/395-1203 

Fax (847) 395-4232 





Worry Out Of Your 
Hext Print Mil 



966 Victoria St. • Antioch 



Her wish Is my command. Tills 
Is the afternoon she came home 
with her newly lost tooth in a red 
treasure chest, beaming that she 
was right all along and mom had 
no clue about the tooth business. 

Proved wrong once again by an 
year old. So after dinner, the tooth 
found Its way into the tooth fairy 
pillow in anticipation for some big 
reward of monetary value. Well the 
resident tooth fairy, In the midst of 
preparing for the next day, com- 
pletely overlooked her tooth fairy 
duties and went to bed. 

The substitute fairy noticing the 
head gum shirked her duties, fum- 
bled in the darkened room to recti- 
fy the situation. Well much to the 
surprise of both tooth fairies, as the 
morning light filled the room, a S5 
liill had replaced the tooth in the 
tooth pillow. 

Seems old second in command 
tooth fairy tried rectifying the situa- 
tion in an unlit room, without his 
much needed contact lenses, and 
misread the number on the curren- 
cy. 

Now all the kids at school want 
to sleep at our house when they 
lose their teeth. I think the substi- 
tute tooth fairy needs to leave some 
of those old accumulated baby 
teeth under his pillow and maybe 
the real tooth fairy will leave 
enough cash so he can have laser 
surgery on his eyes. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for 
"jingle from Pringle" should adl 
Lynn Pringle at 3!)5-636<l. 




To give us 

HOT NEWS TIPS 

call 
Lakeland Newspapers at 

223-8073 

You can leave your name 

and number or 

remain anonymous. 

Leave a message & 



Aqua Pool & Spa Pros 

p The Spa Sales & Service Specialist 






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Up to 6 months - No interest 






i 



t %4-< * 




Oktoberfest 

Antioch resident Susan Tanaschovsky shows off her traditional 
German garb as part of her preparations for the 20th 
Oktoberfest, sponsored by the German American Club of 
Antioch. The event was held Sept. 25 at the Antioch VTW Hall.— 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 

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Shtsh-ka-bobf 



Call ahead for 

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the game* 



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Trie. 

CUPBOARD 

John Phelps - 



Rising to the 
challenge! 



Playing off of last week's col- 
umn, many area athletes, 
for whatever reason, seem 
to slip through the wood- 
works and go unnoticed. 

Well, this is week two of what has 
turned out to be a concentrated ef- 
fort to recognize some of these peo- 
ple and Gumec's Rob Ventura defi- 
nitely fits the bill. ' * 

The 28-year-old Ventura placed 
sixth overall out of 94 cyclists in the 
Inagural Satum USPRO Cycling 
Tour. Representing Team Satum, 
Ventura accumulated 317 total 
points throughout the 1 5 -event Sat- 
urn season scries. 

The tours final race was held two 
weeks ago in Houston, Texas. The 
91-mile road race Included racing 
through downtown Houston end- 
ing with a 300-meter sprint, which 
Ventura finished third with.a per- 
sonal time of 3:03.28. Again, with 
the effort, Ventura finished sixth in 
the overall standings while his team 
was first in the 1999 Saturn USPRO 
Tour. 

The Satum team Is one of the 
top two teams in the North Ameri- 
can,'' said Team Saturn's Assistant 
Director Andy Lee. 

"Robbie ts our fastest sprinter 
and very key in a lot of our criteri- 
um races." 

i For the record, criterium races 
usually consist of 50-60 mile races 
on short one-mile courses, as op- 
posed to a regular road race which 
arc not as fast paced. 
" While the season for Team Sat- 
um is officially over, Ventura's com- 
petition continues. Probably as we 
speak, Ventura Is on a plane en 
route to Australia where he will be 
competing in a M-day event as part 
of The Sun Tour. 

The Satum USPRO Cycling Tour, 
the premier, international cycling 
tour in the U.S., featuring the best 
athletes from around the world, is 
sponsored by Satum and sane- . 
tloncd by USA Cycling. 

The Satum Tour takes place 
coast to coast from Massachusetts 
to California, featuring top the top 
men and women criteriums, single 
day and stage races in the U.S. The 
season begins in early spring and 
culminates in September. 

This year, nearly two dozen 
teams, including die nation's top 
500 male and female professional 
and Olympic level racers, competed 
in the inaugural season. The series 
of races included 15 events and 
over $600,000 in prize money. In 
addition, there was an end-of-the- 
season bonus pool of $100,000. 

For additional information and 
Satum Tour rankings, visit the offi- 
cial Satum Tour website at www.us- 
procyclingtour.com. 

John Phelps can be readied at (847) 
223-8161, exL 132; fax (847) 223- 
8810; or e-mail at edit@U\a\conu 



AREA FOOTBALL 
STANDINGS 

UbertyvUIe 4-1 

Grant 4-1 

Waucpnda 3-2 

Johnsburg 4-1 

Warren 3-2 

Antloch 3-2 

Canmei 2-3 

Grayslake 2-3 

Mundeleln 2-3 

Lake Forest 1-4, 

Round Lake 1-4 

Editor's Note: Please refer to the 
sports section for further results 




October 1, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers / A9 



Youth cheerleader making national waves 



Antioch 11 -year-old cleans house 
atAAU junior Olympics 



By ROB BACKUS 

Staff Reporter . 



Although she is only 1 1 years old, 
Kimberly Anne Conley Is already a 
national champion, winning two 
gold and two silver medals for cheer- 
leading at the AAU junior Olympics 
in Cleveland , Ohio held In August 

Conley began gymnastics at the 
age of four and cheerleading at the 
age of five In Antioch. "She loved It 
immediately" said Conley' s mother 
Laura. 

Conley's first major champi- 
onship was in March of 1997 when 
she won the Individual competition 
at the Ronald McDonald Charity 
Cheerleading Competition at Loyola 
University In Chicago. Her team also 
placed first overall. 

She followed up that victory 
with another six months later at the 
NCA Competition in Gurnee, 
where her cheerleading team, 
placed first. 



That same year she was invit- 
ed to and' attended the Bela 
Karolyi Olympic Gymnastics 
Camp In Huntsville, Texas. Karolyi 
was the head coach of four 
Olympic teams and Is a renowned 
coach and trainer of such champi- 
ons as Nadla Comaneci, Kim 
Zmeskal, Jullanne McNamara, 
Dominique Moceanu, Kerri Strug, 
and Mary Lou Retton. 

In November of 1997 Conley's 
cheer team placed first at the COA 
Regionals at Northern Illinois Uni- 
versity in Dekalb. 

In November of 1998 her cheer 
team took first place at the UCA Re- 
gional Competition in Greendale, 
Wisconsin. 

In December of 1998 she was 
named to the 1998 WCA Cheer Team 
America at the WCA Nationals in 
Nashville, Tennessee. Over ISO 
cheerleaders competed for Team 
America with 33 advancing to the fi- 
nals and 17 being chosen to the 



team. She placed 5th out of the 17. 
This is amazing because she was 
competing with girls who were up to 
14 years of age. 

She began this year with a victo- 
ry at the ISU Super Session Midwest 
Championship held in January in 
Normal. 

In February she was named Per- 
former of the Year and All American 
Champion at the UPA Americup 
Cheer Championship in Minneapo- 
lis, Minnesota. Her junior cheer 
team and junior dance team both 
took first place. 

She also plays volleyball on St. 
Peter's 6th grade team despite the 
fact that she is only In 5th grade. She 
is also a 4.0 student in school 

Up next for Conley will be the 
NCA Competition at Great America 
and she will head back to Nashville 
to defend her titles at the WCA Com- 
petition. 

She has also been invited to per- 
form at the 2000 NFL Pro Bowl in 
Honolulu, Hawaii in February. Ac- 
. cording to her mother, "She will 
probably attend."' ' 

Quite an exciting next few 
months for Kimberly Conley. 




T*> 



Eleven-year-old youth cheer- 
leader Kimberly Conley of Anti- 
och shows off just a few of her 
many accolades.-Subm/ttecf 
photo. 



Libertyville brings Sequoit football back to earth 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



After posting three straight wins, 
the Antioch varsity football team was 
brought back down to earth after its 
28-14 loss to Libertyville last Satur- 
day. 

Quarterback Don Lackey aired it 



out, completing 16-of-28 passes for 
239 yards and two touchdowns. 
Lackey was right on the money in the 
first half, completing 7-of-9 for 140 
yards. . Lackey's first scoring strike.^ 
was a 31 -yard strike to Keli Owens uY~ 
die first quarter. Antioch held a brief 
7-0 lead but it was all Libertyville af- 
ter that, as the Wildcats scored 28 



unanswered points to vault ahead, 
28-7. 

Lackey found Eric White on a 

six-yard scoring pass in the fourth - 

.quarter, but it was too little too late. 

White finished with 1 01 yards on six 

catches. 

The Libertyville defense ha- 
rassed Lackey all day, sacking the se- 



nior signal-caller five times, includ- 
ing four in the second half. «' 

The Sequoit rushing attack was 
held in check, gaining only 24 yards 
as opposed to Libertyville' s 250. 

Antioch (3-2, 2-1) wtil look to get 
back on the winning track when it 
takes on Mundeleln at home this 
Saturday at 1p.m. 



Champions International completes one for the record books 



Champions International had a 
24 hour baseball "jam session." The 
object was to complete 100 innings 
In 24 hours. To our knowledge this 
has never been done and this valiant 
group of 24 individuals from all over 
Illinois and Wisconsin were trying to 
make the Guinness Book of World 
Records by accomplishing this fete. 
Local players included Mac M ansa v- 
age of Riverwoods and Riley Smith of 
Lake Forest. Starting at noon on Sat- 
urday and ending at noon on Sun- 
day, this group amassed 1 1 2 innings 
of continuous baseball. Thanks to 
the permission of the Navy, the game 
was played at Lake County basebal- 



l's field at Fort Sheridan. During this 
period they were also testing wood- 
en bats from the Hoosicr Bat Com- 
pany and the Young Bat Company. 
They were testing for durability, per- 
formance and their feel for the bats. 
This is the team of select young 
men that will represent die United 
Stales at the Victorian Cup Tourna- 
ment in Australia. From Dec 11 to 
the 23rd, this team will play approx- 
imately seven games against local 
club teams. These games will serve 
as a preparation for the best of five 
Victorian Cup Series against the Vic- 
torian State team. The Victorian 
State team consists of the very best 



players from all over the country. 
Traditionally, three to four players 
from this state team eventually get 
signed to professional contracts with 
the major leagues. 

Each player is responsible for his 
own expenses to Australia, Lake 
County Baseball is sponsoring Mac 
Mansavage, so anyone ^wishing to 
help Mac or other players get there, 
can contact Lake County Baseball at 
945*9606. These young men will 
serve as ambassadors for the United 
States and would welcome corporate 
sponsorship. 

Lake County baseball started its 
fall camp on Sept. 1 9. This five week. 



camp will be held at Clavey Field in 
Deerfield from 1 1 a.m. to 2 pan. on 
Sundays for ball players 9 to 12. 
Anyone wishing to register and join 
this instructional camp which ends 
each session with a baseball game. 
Many of the young b all players in 
the camp will be given the opportu- 
niry to play for the Lake County 
Chiefs for the 2000 baseball season. 
Lake County baseball is a non-prof- 
it organization. It's baseball club de- 
. pends on the donations and good 
will of the communities. If you 
would like to help or know someone 
who would, contact Lake County 
baseball at 945-9606. 



* <* 



Sequoit girls tennis shows character in prevailing over Mundelein 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



ui 



I With their backs against the wall, 
ie varsity tennis team showed a lot 
of heart and guts in pulling out a 4-1 
victory over Mundelein last week. 

"The singles players and number 
three doubles were over early and we 



were up 2-1 but Mundelein still had 
our backs to the wall," said head 
coach Bryan PUnske. "But we com- 
posed ourselves and rebounded af- 
ter a tough loss last night to Wood- 
land's." 

Number one player Mandy 
Hughes cruised to a 6-0, 6-1 victory, 
and number two player Silvia Skrip- 



kauskaite also won 6-0, 6-1. 

The number one doubles team 
of Kristen Jensen and Jenny Rogers 
earned a grueling 6-7, 7-6, 6-2 victo- 
ry. The number two team of Heather 
Zeman and Mary O'Neil also pre- 
vailed 4-6, 6-2, 7-6. 

"The number one doubles team 
was down 1-4 in the second set be- 



fore they kicked in the burners," 
added Plinske. "They started volley- 
ing deep and serving deep, which 
kept Mundelein off the net The way 
we finished was very encouraging." 
PUnske was also pleased that the 
team didn't lose focus. "When we 
were in a hole, we could have easily' 
dropped the match." 



ATHLETES OF THE WEEK 



NORTH L 

Namet Andrew Kin 




ney 

School: Antioch 

Sportr Golf 

Yean Senior 

Lut week's statu Fired an 

even-par 35 in taking medalist 

honors In a dnal victory over 

Warren. It marked the lowest 

nine-hole score for the Sequolts 

thus far this season. 



Names Megs Kot- 
larz 

School; Antioch 
Sporti Volleyball 
Yean Senior 
Last week's statu 
Had 27 service points, 31 lolls, 
and a 92% receiving average. She 
was also selected to the all-tour- 
nament team at Stevenson. 




Youth Iceless Hockey standings. 



HsUDMsftoa 
Grades 1-2 

t ■ 

Penquins 

Flyers 

Blues 

Redwings 

Blackhawks 

Ducks 

StarsO 

Bruins 

Ssvwd Dtvtakm 
Grades S-4 

Ducks 1 00 2 



w 


L T 


Pis 


1 





2 


I 





2 


1 


0, 


2 


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2 


0- 


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Blackhawks 
Penquins 
Flyers . 
StarsO 
Blues 



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GrefzfcyDMsloH 

Bruins-, 1 

Redwings 1 

Islanders 1- 

Pan there 1 

Canucks 1 

Sharks 




1 
1 

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A1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



October 1, 1 999 



Antioch boys golf prepares for regionals 



Sequoits ninth at Lake Forest Invite 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



There have been a couple of 
bumps in the road as of late but that 
is definitely no reflection of how well 
the Antioch boys varsity golf team 
has performed this year. 

Now's the time to get serious, 
with the conference meet today nt 
Steeplechase, followed by regional* 
next Tuesday at The Golf CI lib of Illi- 
nois in Algonquin. 

"We've been playing some great 
golf (except for the last week)," said 



head coach Jeff Moxley. "These guys 
have worked really hard and put in a 
lot of time. If someone has a bad 
round, there's always somebody else 
there to pick them up. We have great 
balance." 

Balance seems to be the key 
word this season and was definitely 
evident this past week. 

Antioch fell to Stevenson. 163- 
168 in dual-meet action but the bal- 
anced scoring was led by Christian 
Litkc (40), John Logan and Shaun 
Schuler M2), and Tim Jankowski (<14). 

Antioch then posted a ninth- 



place finish in the Lake Forest Invita- 
tional at Lake Bluff Golf Club over the 
weekend. Tom Davis led the way 
with a 78, including a l-undcr-par35 
on the front nine. I le was backed by 
Schuler's 82, Logan's 84, and Kin- 
ney's 85, 

p "We were a little disappointed 
lhal Tommy didn't place," said Mox- 
ley. "But that doesn't lake away from 
the great round he had, especially on 
the front side." 

Davis has been playing beautiful- 
ly this year, carding rounds of 76, two 
77s, and a 78 in four tournaments. 



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also treat bone disorders, such as rickets and osteoporosis, and metabolic diseases. 

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The Undenhurst Lightning U-10 girls traveling soccer team 
includes back row (from left) coach John Zak, Michelle Guerts, 
Jennifer Zak, Emily Bulow, Kla Miller, Sara Sweeney, Danielle Kir- 
by, and coach Tony Khawaja. Bottom row (from left) is Julie 
Dziki, Caitlin Duffy, Sophie Khawaja, Susie O'Connor, Stephanie 
McGrain, and Stefanie Trulzsch. Not plctured-coach Scott Far- 
reil.— Submitted photo 

Lindenhurst Lightning U-ll 
girls soccer prevails, 2-0 



The Lindenhurst Lightning girls 
U-10 posted a 2-0 shutout over the 
Park Ridge Starz last week. The for- 
wards kept the pressure on during 
the first half. Emily Bulow passed to 
Sophie Khawaja, who kicked a pic- 
ture-perfect goal for the Lightning's 
first score. Two minutes later, 
Khawaja found the net again for a 2- 
Lightning advantage. She was as- 
sisted on the play by Michelle 
Geurts. 



Meanwhile, Sara Sweeney, Susie 
O'Connor and Jennifer Zak did a 
great job In defending their goal 
while keeper Kia Miller stopped four 
shots in keeping the Starz scoreless. 

The offensive pressure stayed on 
during the second half with six shots 
on goal from the Lightning forwards. 
Second half sweeper Stephanie Mc- 
Grain and keeper Ju I ie Dziki held the 
Starz in check in preserving the 
shutout. 



Lady Sequoits third at invitational 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



A solid season continued last 
weekend as the Lady Sequoil varsity 
golf team finished third in its own 
Antioch Invitational, held at Hunter 
Country Club in Richmond. 

Sara Groh, Antioch's number 
one player, finished second after 
carding an 86. Brittany Cable backed 
her with a 93, good Tor a 1 2th place 
medal. 

"We shot about what we've been 
shooting," said head coach Steve 
Wapon. "We still haven't peaked be- 
cause 1 know that we're capable of 
shooting a lot lower scores." 

Carrie Baizcr of Decrfield took 
medalist honors after firing an 83. 
Decrfield won the 10-team event 
with a 35& Rockford Boylan was sec- 
ond (363) and ACUS third-<390). 

Other Antioch scores included 
Danielle Nielsen (105), Mary Stringer 
and Melissa Mitchell (106), and Car- 
rie Cybul (108) over the 5,800, par 72 
layout. 

ACHS (ravels to Bonnie Dundee 
for the Harrington Tournament (his 
Saturday. 

Meanwhile, the IV Sequoits also 
collected a third-place finish last 
week in the Caledonia, Wis. Quad. 
ACHS fired a 349 at Raymond 
Heights GC. Sophomore Erica Hcd- 
lund claimed fifth place with an 83, 



junior Lynscy Ketterling ninth (87), 
and sophomore Whitney Sehmer 
10th (87). 

The JV llnbters (hen followed up 
with another third-place effort Mon- 
day in a tournament at Grcenshirc. 
Sehmer and Hedlund each posted 
42s for nine holes, good for seventh 
place. As a team, Antioch shot a 177, 
with Lake Forest winning the event 
(155). 

Last weekend, the Lady Sequoits 
finished 9th in the 18-tcam Barring- 
ion Invitational. Antioch posted a 
score of 379, with New Trjer winning 
the event (337). 

Scquoit scores had Groh leading 
the way with an 88, followed by Ca- 
ble (95), Cybul (95), and Nielsen 
(101). 

"Sara's been hitting the ball very 
well," noted Wapon. "She's been 
struggling fust a tittle bit though on 
the greens. But her hard work .and 
time will hopefully pay off the next 
two weeks as we head into the tour- 
naments." 

The Sequoits compete in the 
NSC meet this Thursday at Deerpath 
GC in Lake Forest, followed by the 
Champaign Centennial Tournament 
over the weekend. 

"Tilings continue to get tougher 
and tougher," said Wapon. "The 
scores at Harrington are just another 
indicator of how good high school 
girls golf is getting." 



NEE 



*?i 



-T 




tit 




? 



Call Lakeland Newspaper's 

Circulation-Dept at 
' (847)223-8161 




11 



mjxrl, 1999 



SPORTS 



HMMMI 



Lakeland Newspapers/ At 1 



ions crowned at Wilmot, Lake Geneva 




It 



he Lakeland area fs full 
of motorsports champi- 
ons from the 1999 sea* 
son. 
emier Racing Production's 
lot Speedway concluded Its 
crowning Antioch's Tommy 
n as Star Trac 410 Outlaw 
ed Sprint Car Champion 
Lake Villa's Rob Olson as 

modified king, 
t Lake Geneva Raceway, 
kiln's AlSchlll chalked up 
super late model crown, 
le Grayslakc's Chad Ross 
tured his first ever sport 
ck title.. Wonder Lake's Zac 
eringer took the super stock 
wn, with Burlington's Scott 
rltz already clinched the 
ortsman title. 
At Wllmot's season champi- 
nshf p/fan appreciation night 
cpt. 25, a beautiful fall full bar- 
est moon night and expertly 
repared one-third mile clay 
val produced lightening fast ac- 
ton. Following the always popu- 
ar pre-race driver's autograph 
esston in the track's picnic area, 
was time to get down to busi- 
ness. 

In the sprint car season fi- 
nale, it proved a memorable 
night for Fred Michaels and wife 
Amy as the Kenosha couple cele- 
brated their fifth wedding an- 
niversary with Fred's first-ever 
sprint car feature victory. Anti- 
och's Sexton collected a runner- 
up finish; Gurnce's Tony Engcls 
third; Twin Lakes' Todd Lehr 
sixth; Beach Park's Michael 
Dubs 12th; Zion's Doug Dean 
15th; Waukegan's Jay Sachs 16th; 
1999 Rookie of The Year, 
Winthrop Harbor's Brent Mason, 
was 17th; and, Beach Park's Lar- 
ry Vandervere 19th. 

Mason was a double winner, 

taking a heat and the "B" main 
checkered flag. Dubs, Vander- 
vere and Matt Dworak of 
Kenosha won the other heats. 
Sexton had fast time among the 
31 sprint cars on hand. Lake 
Zurich's Kevin Eltz, a first-year 



SPORTS DIGEST 

The Linden hurst fastpltch 
Softball team will be conducting a 
school providing pitching and hitting 
instruction. The school is open to girls 
(all level players) ages 9-18 that are 
members of one of the Lindcnhursl 
Fastpitch softball traveling teams and 
begin this Saturday from 3-5 p.m. 
There will also be sessions available 
on Thursday. The school will be held 
at the B.J. Hooper School Gym in Lin - 
denhursL For further details and rates 
(there are several), call The Linden- 
hurst Fastpitch Softball School 

Learn competitive softball 
pitching and hitting techniques as 
practiced by the Lindenhurst Travel- 
ing Softball program mechanical 
aides that are used to develop prop- 
er fundamentals. 

Jenny Spongier, a 1996 U.S. 
Marathon Olympian, will be at the 
Antioch Community High School 
Cross-Country Invitational on Satur- 
day, OcL2, beginning at 10 a,m.Span- 
gler won the 1996 U.S. Olympic 
Marathon trials in Atlanta, Ga. She 
was also a three-time Ail-American in 
cross-country and track and field at 
the University of Iowa. The meet will 
be held at Fox River Park in Wilmot, 
Wis. located on County Highway F. 

And Finally, high school aged 
students arc encouraged to try out 
for the lindenhurst U-15 and 
older traveling soccer team. 
The tryouts will take place nt 4:30 
p.m. on Saturday, October 9 at Pol- 
ley Field off of Grass Lake and Deep 
Lake Roads in Antioch. A make-up 
date is scheduled for Saturday, Oc- 
tober 23. Any questions can be di- 
rected to Jeff Heath at 356-7616 or 
Ron Placko at 395-7066. 



MtllUMIMIMM.,1,11,1,, ,rM<l,>lMM|.<,fMI>f'IH. 



1 



LET'S GO 

RACING . . . 



MicliaelH.Babicz 



competitor, was uninjured after 
a barrel-rolling flip In the "B" 
main. 

Sexton, a second generation 
driver whose father, Tommy Sex- 
ton of Crystal Lake, raced for » 
many years, thanked his car 
owners, WallyTynis and Donnie 
Schroff, his sponsors, crew 
members, fans, and especially 
wife Paula and daughter Jen- 
nifer. It's Sexton's third Wilmot 
track title, having previously 
won in the mini-modifieds and 
the Modified Racing Association 
modifieds. 

The IMCA modified crown 
came down to the last race of the 
year and a battle between two 
good friends and teammates. 
Waukegan's Ed Devall won the 
battle by taking the feature vic- 
tory, but lost the war to the third 
placing finishing Olson. Olson 
won the championship by 12 
points over Devall. The two work 
together at Midwest Motorcoach 
in Gurnee, share the same race 
shop and Devall used to serve as 
crew chief for Olson. 

Sterling's Casey Schram was 
second in the feature and Dr. 
Ken Johnson or Park Ridge, the 
"racing dentist" from Antioch 
Dental Center, finished his 
Rookie of The Year season by 
turning in a fourth-place effort. 
Antioch's Jim Morrison, another 
first-year driver, was fifth. 

Other finishers Included 
. Genoa City's Mike Simons 11 
sixth; Waukegan's Scott Shultis, 
another rookie who won the "B" 
main, seventh; McHenry's Bob 
Tellefscn eighth; Beach Park's 
Dan Hopkins ninth; Gurnce's 
Ray Olson, a rookie, 11th; 
Waukegan's Chuck Needham 
13th; Wilmot's Warren Meyer 
14th; Antioch's Scott Kuxhousc 
15th; and, Genoa City's Nick Si- 




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mons 17th. 

Schram, Johnson, Kuxhousc 
and M. Simons were among heat 
race winners. 

The final event of the millen- 
nium was the Wild Winged 
Women Sprint Car Challenge 
presented by Cltgo Auto/Truck 
Plaza of Racine. The five ama- 
teur female competitors com- 
peted In the five lap event with 
Bristol's Lisa Duben, driving 
husband Jack's sprint car, taking 
the victory. The couple are par- 
ents to three children and foster 
parents to three more. Jill Spitz 
of Pleasant Praric finished sec- 
ond, Sandy Nelson of Trevor 
third, and Kansasville's Amy 
Litkey and (Crystal Campenalla 
of Kenosha were eliminated in a 
first-turn opening lap crash. In 
all, the five lap event saw four 
different leaders. 

The track was really fast and 
in great shape," said Duben. 
"Jack had the car running strong 
and I just picked up where he 
left off." 

Premier Racing Production's 
Night of Champions Banquet for 
Wilmot Speedway competitors 
will be Saturday, January 15, 
2000 at Maravella's Banquet 
Center In Fox Lake. For ticket In- 
formation, contact at track office 
395-0500 or watch the web sight 
www.wilmotspeedway.com. 

Wilmot is slated to open its 
2000 season next May. 

Although the champions are 
decided, Lake Geneva continues 
to host motorsports action three 
more weekends in October. This 
Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 1-3, is the 
Fall Classic, featuring Wiscon- 
sin's largest field of competitors. 
Racing Oct. 1 is at-7:30 p.m., Oct. 
2 at 6 p.m. and Oct. 3 at 1 p.m. 
For the latest Information or In 
case of inclement weather ad- 
justments to the schedule, 
phone 414-248-8566. 

Lake Geneva hosts its tradi- 
tional "run what ya brung" exot- 



ic night of motorsports Satur- 
day, Oct. 9. The original Goblin 
250 for the Midwest Enduro 
Stock Car Series Is Sunday after- 
noon, Oct. 24 with a children's 
costume contest planned along 
with a powder puff event for fe- 
male competitors. 

Schill won his third consecu- 
tive Lake Geneva crown by win- 
ning the season championship 
feature when the Initial race 
winner was disqualified in a post 
race technical inspection. Park 
City's Danny Darnell finished 
second and Johnsburg's Bob 
Moellcr ninth. 

Deerlnger scored another . 
feature win in his season cham- 
pionship winning super stock 
year. Lake Zurich's Marty Robb 
was second, Crystal Lake's Scott 
Eggebrccht fifth, semi-feature 
winner, and Antioch's John 
Maki, was eighth. Wonder Lake's 
Todd Peterson and Robb were 
among heat winners while 
Genoa City's John Jans sen took 
the dash. 

C. Ross closed out his cham- 
pionship campaign with a victo- 
ry in the sport truck feature. 
Other finishers included Liber- 
tyville's Curt Matson second; 
Woodstock's James Olson third; 
Wadsworth's Vincent Merry 
fourth; and, Grayslake's Todd 
Ross seventh. Other Ross family 
members, Lance of Kenosha and 
RJ of Northbrook, were eighth 
and ninth, respectively. Chad 
won the heat race and Todd cap- 
tured the dash. 

Burlington's Jeff Way scored 
the legend car feature win. 

The J&L Oil/United Ex- 
pressline Interstates Racing As- 
sociation (IRA) Outlaw Winged 
Sprint Car Series concluded its 
season with the 3rd Annual 
Frank Filskov Memorial Sept. 25 
at Plymouth, Wis. Joe Roe, a 
Zion businessman, from 
Kenosha won the 27-lap feature 
in honor of a former IRA com- 



petitor who lost his life racing. 
Beach Park's Darrell Dodd was 
second, Beach Park's Joe Krlstan 
sixth, and Johnsburg's Dave 
Moulisjoth. Bruce Oldenburg of 
Round Lake Beach was among 
the heat race winners. IRA 
champion Donny Goeden was 
uninjured in a feature race flip, 
but already had the title 
clinched. 

- For information on the IRA 
banquet or 2000 series, contact 
Lake Villa's Steve Sinclair, IRA 
president, 265-9192. 

The Midwest Enduro Series 
will be at 141 Speedway in Fran- 
cis Creek, Wis. Saturday, Oct. 2, 
with race time 7 p.m. 

Sheboygan County Fair Park 
Speedway in Plymouth, Wis. 
hosts the Annual Fall Classic for 
clay track cars this Friday and 
Saturday. Divisions including 
Midwest Sprint Association 360 
sprints, IMCA modifieds, mini- 
sprints and several stock car di- 
visions with nine classes In all 
are scheduled to compete. For 
information 920-876-3166 or 
920-467-3862. 

And, The Chicagoland area is 
taking another step toward be- 
ing part of major league motor- 
sports. Raceway Associates, 
headed by NASCAR president 
and International Speedway 
Corporation chairman Bill 
France, and Tony George, chair- 
man of Indianapolis Motor 
Speedway Corporation and pres- . 
ident of Pep Boys Indy Racing 
League, joined Sept. 28 for offi- 
cial ground breaking ceremonies 
for the $100 million superspeed- 
way being constructed near Joli- 
et and the existing Route 66 « 

Raceway. The new facility Is ex- 
pected to host 1RL and NASCAR 
events beginning in spring, 2001. 

Michael H. Babicz can be 
reached at (847) 223-8161, ext. 
138; fax (847) 223-8810; ore- 
mailatedit@lnd.com. 



Honor the Angels in Your Life! 

Purchase a unique, personalized 7" ivory, gold and bronze colored 

Angel Ornament for $25* to honor a special person in your life this 

holiday season. Your ornament will be displayed with other angels on 

OUT special tree at the Festival o/7rees (at Midlane Country dub. November 17-21). 

You may pick up your ornament at the Festival on Sunday, November 21 

after 3 p.m. or arrange to have it shipped to you for an additional fee. 

All proceeds benefit Victory Community ElderCARE*. Limited 

number available. Call 847-360-4248 for information. 




Angel Ornament Order Form - Order by November 1 



I wish to honor a special person in my life with a personalized Angel Ornament: 
D In Memory of D In Honor of 

Name of honoree (print): 



(If purchasing Additional ornaments, list honorces' names on a leparate sheet, include addresses for acknowledgements.) 
Please send on acknowledgement of this gift to: 

Name (print): • 

Address: 

City: 



State: 



Zip:. 



D I will pick up my Angel Ornament D Please ship my Angel Ornament 

(If you wish us to ship your ornament to an address other than the one below, please include that address on a separata sheet) 

Purchaser's Namo (print): ; . * 

Address: ' 






City: 

Telephone number:, 

D Please bill $ 



State: 



Zip:. 



for 



ornaments ($25 each) to my: D Mastercard □ Visa D*Discover v 

(Add S3 shipping and handling per ornament if being shipped) 

Account Number 

Signature 



Expiration Date. 



D Enclosed is a check for S 



for 



ornaments ($25 each) 



(Add S3 shipping and handling per ornament if being shipped) 

Mail form with check payable to: 

Festival of Trees • Victory Hospital Foundation 

1324 North Sheridan Road 

Waukegan, Illinois G00BS 

'$20.62 of each ornament purchased is tax-deductible. 








A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



October 1, 1999 



* r 

Geo-Karis celebrates '100 days to the millennium' 



Attorney General Jim Ryan attends 
fund-raiser at Gurnee Holiday Inn 



By SANDY HARTOGH 
Staff Reporter 



A multitude of friends and sup- 
porters attended State Senator 
Adeline Geo-Karis' last fund-raiser 
of the century at the Gurnee Holi- 
day Inn Sept. 23. 

Illinois Attorney General Jim 
Ryan was the guest of honor at the 
event which bore the title, "100 
days to the Millennium for Senator 
Adeline ]i Geo-Karis, the Un- 
changeable Legend." 

A reception line introduced 
guests to Geo-Karis and Ryan be- 
fore they entered a lively affair 
that hosted an array of detectable 
hors d'oeuvrcs, ice sculptures and 



a live band. (BobSchrocdcr, Lake- 
land publisher Rill Shroedcr's 
brother, was playing the saxo- 
phone). 

The band voiced the senti- 
ments of those present by playing 
a rendition of "Sweet Adeline" to 
the tune of "Sweet Caroline" when 
the senator entered the room. 

Lake County Coroner Barbara 
Richardson and Circuit Court 
ClcrkjSally Coffclt sang a tribute to 
Geo-Karis to the tune of "Hooray 
for the Red, White and Blue", be- 
fore introducing Ryan. 

Ryan read a letter from State 
Treasurer ludy Baar Topinka en- 
dorsing Geo-Karis and crediting 
the "unchangeable legend" with 



her own personal success. 

"It is still remarkable that after 
being a politician and lawyer for so 
many years, Adeline can still have 
so many friends," quipped Ryan. 

On a more serious note, Ryan 
complimented Geo-Karis on her 
dedication to issues important to 
the state, such as crime, health 
care, senior citizen protection and 
people with disabilities. 

Lake County Republican 
Chairman John Schulicn acknowl- 
edged a long list of distinguished 
guests including Ted Lechowlcz, a 
representative for Governor 
George Ryan and State Represen- 
tative Andrea Moore, before pre- 
senting Geo-Karis to her many 
supporters. 

"That was the longest intro- 
duction you've 1 ever made," joked 
Geo-Karis, before thanking the au- 
dience for their support. 






1 



p *.' " 




■ 
















trJP ■•:, % i| 





State Senator Adeline Geo-Karis listens to Illinois Attorney Gen- 
eral Jim Ryan share remarks at a fund raiser for Geo-Karis held 
at the Gurnee Holiday Inn.— Photo by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 



CLC NOTES 



* 



'Genie and the 
Magic Lamp' 

The famous Arabian Night's talc 
of the young man and the genie or 
die lamp will be recounted in die Col- 
lege of Lake County's children's the- 
atre producdon "Aladdin.", The show 
will be presented at 9 and 1 1 am Oct. 
7 and 8; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 9 and 2 
p.m. Oct. 10 in die Mainstage Theatre 



at the Grayslakc Campus. 

The show is an original produc-. 
tion based on the classic story, which 
is being refreshed and narrated by a 
group of wandering actors, with the 
creative use of innovative staging, im- 
provisations, mime, magic and con- 
temporary dialogue. This version is 
guaranteed to delight school-age 
children and adults alike. The show 
may not be suitable for very young 



children. 

The cast members are as fol- 
lows: 

Genie of Lamp and Ring-Gabriel 
Williams of Round Lake Beach; Sul- 
tan-GcrritWynkoopofZion; Princess 
Sabrina-Laura Braoten of Vernon 
Hills; Evil Magician-Matt Femming of 
AnUoch; Aladdin-f oey Garris of Liber- 
tyville; Aladdin's Mother-Kathy Bird- 
sail of Lindcnhurst. 



(SJntroducintf 



\v 



Dean S. Economos, MP 

FAMILY PRACTICE 



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relationship with my patients in 
treating their long-term health, 
as opposed to merely treating a 
specific health problem. " 




Residency 

University of Illinois College of Medicine, Rockford, Illinois 



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Monday: 10 am to 6 pm 

Tuesday; 11 am to 7 pm 

Wednesday: 9 am to 5 pm 

Friday: 8 am to 4 pm 

Alternate Saturdays: 9 am to 1 pm 



Accepting many 
insurance plans 

Now accepting 
new patients 



Se habla espanol— Hispanic patients welcome; 



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Westjlake Clinic 

214 Washington Street 
Ingleside, IL 60041 



(847) 973-9640 



Narrator and Assistant Direc- 
tor-Brandon Schwandt of Liber- 
tyville; Pico the Mute-Marc Coiatri- 
no of Antloch 

Tickets are S5 all scats. A special 
school group rate of S3 per person 
for 10 or more students Is available 
for the Oct. 7 and B performances, 
with advanced reservations. For tick- 
ets, call the box office at 543-2300. 

Dance Fiesta with 
Mexican Folk Music 

Dynamic music and acrobatic 
dance demonstrations will create the 
atmosphere of a dance fiesta as 
Chicago's premier Mexican folk mu- 
sic group "Soncs dc Mexico Ensem- 
ble" performs at the College of Lake 
County on Oct. 15. The program will 
begin at 8 p.m. In the Studio Theatre 
on the Grayslake Campus, 19351 W. 
Washington St. 

Established in 1994, Soncs dc 
Mexico specializes in "Son," a rich 
and lively Mexican music tradition 
that reflects many regional styles. 
The group's cross-cultural view of 
music links "Son" to the diverse eth- 
nic roots of Mexico's mestizo culture: 
Native-American, Spanish, and the 
often-overlooked influence of Black 
music in Mexico. The group's 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Doublo E Storago will sell the goods 
tor non-payment from Unit #77 and 
Unit #93 • Tony Lulz. Sale will lata 
place at 676 Anita Ave. Antloch, IL AT 
10:00 a.m. Oct. 9. 1999. 

1099A-2945-AN 
October 1, 1999 
Octobor 8, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Mama Lavas' 

Homo Town Doll 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 389 Lake 
Streot, Antioch, IL 60002 (847) 395- 
2450 (physical) 

1036 Bishop Stroot, Antloch. IL 60002 
(847) 395-1847 (mailing) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Annamarie Houghton, 1036 Bishop 
Street. Antioch, IL 60002 (847) 395- 
1847 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business trom the locaUan(s) Indicated 
and that the true or real lull name(s) of 
(he porson(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting tho business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

I si Annamarie Houghton, September 
21,1999. 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by tho per- 
son(s) Inlondlng lo conduct the bush 
n oss t h i s 2 1 st d a y o I September, 1 999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
isf Dana Krapf 
Notary Public 
Rocoivod: Soptombflr2t, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
. . 1099A-2944-AN 
October 1, 1999 
October B, 1999 
Octobor 15, 1999 



CD "Que Florczca!" (Let It Bloom) 
explores the origin of Mexican music 
through various ethnic roots. Their 
performances throughout the Mid- 
west have received rave reviews. The 
Chicago Tribune noted, The group 
moves seamlessly between styles 
and instruments, playing with rock- 
n-rol! energy without sacrificing cul- 
tural authenticity." 

The six- piece band will perform 
more than 25 folk, string, percussion 
and wind instruments as well as vo- 
cal arrangements and colorful dance 
presentations. The event Is co-spon- 
sored with the David Adler Cultural 
Center (DACQ of Libertyville. 

Tickets arc $12 for the general 
public, $10 for CLC students, alum- 
ni, -seniors 65+, children under 12 
and DACC members. Visa, Master- 
Card, American Express and Discov- 
er nrc accepted. For reservations, call 
the box office at 543-2300. 

( t ' ' 

Presenting International 
Horror Films 

Three International horror Films 
will be featured in the College of Lake 
County's Halloween film series in 
October. All movies will begin at 7 
p.m. in Room D 100 at the Grayslakc 
Campus. Admission Is free and open 
to the public 

The movies shown are as fol- 
lows: 

Oct. Diabolique (French) 

Oct. 15 Ganja & Hess (a rare 
African-American vampire film) 

Oct. 22 Dead Alive (New 
Zealand) 

All films are rated "R" and inap- 
propriate for children. For informa- 
tion, call Patrick Gonder at 543-2555. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: R & S Sports 

Cards 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1228 
Cedar Lake Rd, Sto. C. Round Lake, IL 
60073. (847) 546-2273, 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Lofoy Blum, Jr. 24881 W. Ravine Dr., 
P.O. Box 543, Lake Villa, IL 60046 
(847) 265-0901 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intond(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) indicated 
and thai the truo or real full name(s) of 
tho person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting (he business is/are correct 
03 shown. 
Is! Loroy Blum, Sept. 7, 1099 

The foregoing Instalment was ac- 
knowledged beforo me by the per- 
son(s) Intending lo conduct the busl- 
ness this 7th day of September, 1999. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/ Julio A. Lundquist 
Notary Public 
Received; September 8, 1999 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0999C-2918LV/RL 
Soplombor 17,1999 
Soptembor 24,1999 
October 1,1999 



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COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 3 






Goddess of gourds 



Grayslake artist to help celebrate the 
millennium with those from other states 



f SANDY HARTOGH 
sff Reporter, 



Grayslake resident Gail Ueder, 
so known as the "Grayslake Gourd 
uly," will be one of 17 award-win- 
nngarlists featured at the4th annu- 
1 Goddess Gourd Festival to be held 
it Prairie Crossing on Oct. 9-10. 

The festival, which celebrates 
Hie 2000 Garden Millennium Project, 
[draws gourd artists froth California, . 
Washington, North Carolina," Ohio 
[and Kentucky, as well as Illinois. 

Gourds, which are considered to 
be the oldest plant grown and used, 
include edible families such as cu- 
cumbers, watermelons, pumpkins 
and squash. 

The genera that arc widely used 
in the gourd art form arc the lagc- 
naria (hard shell gourds), (he cucur- 
bita (ornamental gourds) and the 
Itiffa (vegetable sponge). 

The hard shell species are 
Uedcr's Forte, She works with dipper, 
kettle, martin house and cannonball 
gourds, to name a few. 

Ueder, who has lived in 
Grayslake for 1 1 years, discovered 
her "gourdability" in 1995 while on a 
trip to Atlanta, Georgia to visit 
friends. 

"I read about gourds 30 years 
ago," she said. "1 just never saw a 
goiird big enough to paint on." 

Her jaunt to Atlanta changed her 
vision when she spotted an adver- 



tisement for kettle gourds. She and a 
friend bought 75 gourds for seventy- 
five cents apiece. 

"I've been inhaling gourd dUst 
ever since," admitted Ueder, who 
works on her craft about 6 hours per 
day. 

"Gourds are interactive —they 
tell you what to do," she claims. 

* 

'Gourds are interactive — 

they tellyou what to do, 

Tfteyare totally unique in 

that you can never repeat 

yourself 

Grayslake artist Gait Ueder 



"They are totally unique In that you 
can never repeat yourself." 

The only thing detriment to their 
uniqueness is the fact that gourd art 
cannot be mass produced, Ueder 
says. She has already developed ten- 
donitis of the thumb and elbow as a 
result of her craft, which is very "la- 
bor intensive." 

Llcder has received various 
awards for her artwork, including the 
Lake County Art Society Fair's Award 
of Excellence. She is a member of the 
American Gourd Society and the Illi- 
nois Artisans Society. 

Her work is displayed af the Mil- 
lennium Art Gallery in Ubertyville, 



the Illinois Artisans Shop at the 
Thompson Center in Chicago, and 
Antioch's Craftcrs Gallery/Tulip 
Patch. 

Lieder's gourds are indicative of 
a wide spectrum of both arts and 
crafts. She prefers to show her work 
at art fairs as opposed to craft fairs 
because, she says, patrons of craft 
fairs don't always appreciate the 
time and effort that goes into her 
artistic creations, which can range In 
price from S18 to $145. 

Ueder buys her gourds "sight 
unseen" from a supplier in Georgia. 
Those that arrive broken are not 
wasted, she says. Designing gourd 
jewelry is another avenue she has 
ventured down in the art world. 

"Gourds are now being accepted 
as a fine craft in the north," said Lei- 
der, who is planning to attend 
Ohio's October Gourd Show which is 
said to be the largest gourd festival In 
. the world. 

The Goddess Gourd Festival, 
which begins at 10 am, will also fea- 
ture artist demonstrations, books, 
supplies and seed sales, and chil- 
dren's crafting. 

Hayridcs will be offered both 
days of the fesL Stories from the Gar- 
den will begin at 2 p.m. on Saturday 
. featuring Grandmother Gourdelia 
(Carolyn Finzer). who Is the keeper 
of plant mythology and de-vine leg- 
end. 

.On Sunday at 2:00 p.m. the Spir- 



Mill Creek Farm up 

for sale after 12 years 

Owner wants to move^ horse 
breeding operation to Kentucky 



By CAROLYN LYNCH 
Staff Reporter 



Mill Creek Farm, located at 
19555 Edwards Rd. in Old Mill 
Creek, is up for sale after 12 years, 
of providing Lake County with 
premier horse breeding. Connie 
Ingle', owner of the farm, wants to 
move her business to Kentucky. 

> "That's really where the heart 
of thoroughbreds are," said Ingle. 

Property prices in Kentucky 
arc about 1/5 cheaper than those 
in this area, Ingle said. She cited 
the benefits of relocating to a less 
expensive property while retain- 
ing the same amount of business. 

"I'm basically sitting on a 
property that's more valuable to 
sell than to keep my business on," 
said Ingle. 

Ingle expressed fear that peo- 
ple would not continue to do 
business with Mill Creek Farm 
once they learned it would be 
moving. However, Ingle does ad- 
mit wanting to sell the property, 
and fur .sale signs arc posted for all 
to see on Route 45 and Edwards 
Road. 

Sandy Golladay, the Keller 
Williams agent listing the proper- 
ty, wouldn't quote its price, but 
said it was in the upper brackets. 
That's not surprising, considering 
the property's beauty, size, and 
quality of repair. 

"It's not something that's out 
in the public. It's an estate, and I 
don't publish the price In our ad- 
vertisements, either," said Golla- 
day. 



The property is worth a com- 
bined amount of about 5269,514, 
according to the County Asses- 
sor's Office. Of course, the asking 
price may be quite a bit more than 
that, since property in Lake Coun- 
ty is so hot right now. 

Ingle hopes to maintain a 
good rapport with the communi- 
ty while Mill Creek Farm remains 
here. 

"This may take two and a half 
to three years to sell. We will con- 
tinue to breed and foal thorough- 
breds until we leave," said Ingle. 




Mill Creek Farm, located in Old 
Mill Creek, north of Route 173, 
is now for sale. The property, 
home to champion thorough- 
breds, has been breeding 
horses for 12 years.— Photo 
by Sandy Bressner 




Artist Gail Leider drills drain holes in the bottom of a pyrographed 
gourd bird house. Pyrographlng is a process of burning a deco- 
rative pattern Into the gourd. — Submitted Photo By Meredith 
Schnelk 



itual Journey Percussion Ensemble 
will perform using musical instru- 
ments made from gourds. 

At 4:00 p.m. the Harvest Cere- 
mony of Thanksgiving invites every- 
one to bring stories and samples of 



their garden harvest to exchange. 

Admission to the festival is S3 — 
children are free. Prairie Crossing is 
on Route 45 just south of Route 120. 
For more information call 773-267- 
2413. 




COLUMBIA COLLEGE 



SERVING THE LAKE COUNTY AREA SINCE 1974 



Associate and Bachelor's degrees 
Evening and weekend classes 
Eight-week sessions 
Affordable tuition 

Financial aid available to qualified students 
Conveniently located just off Route 41 
i Accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 



SESSIONS START IN JANUARY, MARCH, JUNE, AUGUST & OCTOBER. 



NEXT SESSION STARTS OCTOBER 24TH. 



Columbia College of Missouri - Lake County 

200 Old Skokie Road ■ Park City, Illinois 60085 

847/336-6333 ■ www.ccis.edu 




mis \< SQiamr. m.d. Providing a Unique Partnership in Health Care William a. /Martina, w.d. 
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24 Hr. Answering Service • 847- 548. 2200 • Se habla esparto! 
1170 E, Befvidere Road • Suite 10S • Grayslake, IL 60030-2073 



A14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



October 1, 1999 



Farm heritage makes a comeback in Lake County 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter 



What was once a dominant fea- 
ture of the Lake County landscape 
once again took center stage for a 
weekend. 

Tlie Like County Museum host- 
ed the two-day Lake County Farm 
Heritage Show Sept. 25 to 26 at Lake- 
wood Forest Preserve. It was in its 
seventh year at the Wauconda site. ' 

"People come hy and you can 
hear some interesting stories," said 
Pat Stanley, standing nearby a 146 
Fnrmail tractor which cost $709 in 
1940, but would cost $7,000 today. 

The familiar red Farmall and 
green John Deer tractors and farm 
equipment lined the area designated 



and a steady stream of suburbanites 
were curious onlookers, 

Stanley participated and won an 
award for his farm vehicles at the 
Wauconda Rodeo last June. His fam- 
ily, from Gary and Wauconda, got 
him into the hobby, he said. 

'It is a chance to get 

together and talk to the 

other guys who farm* 

Ed Topel of Wauconda 

"I got this vehicle from a guy in 
Downers Grove and restored it. It is 
a utility tractor used around the 
farm. I also have a round bail mow- 




Frank Kirk of Kenilworth is shown how to spin wool by Darryl 
'Russell of Gurnee during the Farm Heritage Show at the Lake 
County Museum in Wauconda.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



i. 




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when you open your account. 



er," Ken Hoffman, who lives on 13 
acres of land in Long Grove near the 
Lake-Cook county line, said. 

His son, Tim, 14, has been help- 
ing with the vehicles for two years 
and attends Stevenson High School. 
"It handles well," he said of a 1957 
tractor. 

Renewing friendships from for- 
mer colleagues is important for 
some. 

"I was talking with a guy who 
lives in Island Lake and used to work 
in tractor sales Tor Lewis Equip- 
ment," Cliff Wcnte, who had tractors, 
a saw and other equipment nearby, 
said. 

Ed Topel of Wauconda had sev- 
eral pieces of equipment to show 
off. "It is a chance to get together 
and talk to the other guys who farm. 
My dad has some old tractors he 
got at an auction and 1 liked his. It 
is fairly easy to buy a tractor, but it 
Is getting harder. You have to go 
fnrther west to get the old ones," he 
said. 

Topel had has 1937 Internation- 
al tractor, others older and with more 
rust, on display. 

The Lake County Farm Heritage 
Association, a 200 member group 
which meets at the Lake County 
Farm Bureau, helps coordinate the 
program 

"It is farm heritage— leam bydo- 
ing type of stuff," Don Schrciber of 
Gurnee, an association director, said. 

"It is like a time warp," Wendell 
Stevenson, who lived in Ohio until 
1969, said. 

"It is for education for the kids 
and a good time for families," said 
Donald Snetsingcr, Lake County 
Farm Heritage Association president 
of Lake Zurich. 

Some lamented the growth of 




One-year-old Trace Miller of Wadsworth perches atop his grand- 
father's tractor on display at the Farm Heritage Show at the Lake 
County Museum in Wauconda.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Lake County, with land worth much 
more to develop as housing than to 
farm. 

Margaret Pfeiffer showed many 
of the skills the farmsteadcrs used to 
have to use to just survive. Recipes 
were often handed down from one 
generation to the next. 

"They ate egg noodles, chicken 
noodle soup, beef noodles, out of 
flour, egg, and milk," Pfeiffer said. 

"I enjoy preserving history. One 
of my ancestors, George Ross, signed 
the Constitution." 

It was a tough life, though. 

"They did not have any of the 
conveniences. They had to pump 



their own water; go chop wood; go 
make a pliers. There were often large 
families, and they took care of each 
other. The way we view leisure time, 
they viewed taking care of each oth- 
er," Pficffcr said. "There was a lot of 
home remedies." 

"There were no Wal-Marts," she 
joked. 

A parade of antique farm vehi- 
cles and cars highlighted the show, at 
2 p.m. each day. Chain saw carving, 
a homestead, horse-drawn wagon 
rides were all provided. 

There was even an original ma-' 
mire spreader, made by Oliver Supe- 
rior. 



LAKE COUNTY CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING 



Paradise club 

A discussion group for people 
who want to explore alcohol and/or 
drug use in their lives. 

Join in every first Tuesday of the 
month from 6 to 7 p.m. at The Lake 
County Center for Independent Liv- 
ing, 706 East Hawley Street, 
Mundelein. 



To give us 

HOT NEWS TIPS 

coll 
Lakeland Newspapers at 

223-8073 

You can leave your name 

and number or 

remain anonymous. 

Leave a message & 

we'll check it out! 



For more information call: 949- 
444QV/TTY 

Deaf/Hard of 
Hearing 

Lake County Center for Inde- 
pendent Living will have another 
pager training for deaf/ Hard of Hear- 
ing on Saturday, Oct. 16 at 10 a.m. 
The vibrator pager will warn you 
about me bad weather, flood, torna- 
do, storm, blizzard and more. It's for 
Lake County residents only. Loan of 
a pager is $10 with free monthly ser- 
vice. It is free training. The training 
will take up to one hour and will be 
held at Lake County Center for Inde- 
pendent Living, 377 North Seymour 
Ave. Suite 5, Mundeiein. We'll pro- 
vide refreshments and sign language 
interpreter. If you need captioning, 
Please RSVP by Nov. 1. 



Contact person: Delynn Saun- 
ders, Deaf Services Coordinator 949- 
4440TTY/V. 

LCC Independent 

■ ■ ■ ■ 

Living 

Lake County Center for Lake 
County Center for Independent Liv- 
ing moved to a new address 
377 N. Seymour Avenue, Suite $ 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

Support Group for Hard of 
Hearing and Late Deafened Adults 
who are interested In Communica- 
tions, Assistive Devices, and Self- 
Management. Meeting will be every 
first Tuesday of the month at the 
Lake County Center for Independent 
Living from 7 to 8 p.m. 

Admission is free. There will be 
snacks and captioning. 

For questions, call Dcbra at 949- 
4440 TTW Voice 



Lakeland Newspapers 



gpsgg 


If 




Dg'4 j* 




p, • 




■a? 



Karin Kovell 

Account Executive, 14 Years of Experience 

Serving Antioch, Lake Villa, Undenhurst 
& Wisconsin 

PHONE (847) 223-8161, ext. 105 

PAGER (847) 237-0611 

Favorite Part of the Job: 

The Creativity Of Designing Effective Ad 
Campaigns That Produce Results 



Makiim News In Your ( nmmunih 






Lakeland Newspapers / A1 5 



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October 1, 1999 




REMODELING SALE 

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Curb the clutter 



, ■ 

. A backyard shed helps keep tools in order 




hen gelling to your lawn mower becomes 
(i bigger job lhan the work you plan lo 
do, you probably need to build a storage 
shed. 

No matter if you bolt together a kit or build some- 
thing from scratch, constructing a shed can be a fair- 
ly simple and inexpensive project and will give you a 
place to store tools, equipment and children's toys. 

While putting a garden shed together is easy 
enough, choosing (be right one may take some 
homework. 

Kit or construct? 

Unless you're a skilled carpenter, exhaust all your 
kit options before building, recommends Tony Oroz- 
co, with The I Ionic Depot. Willi n variety of basic 
styles on (he market, you will probably be able to find 
one thai meets your needs. Kits arc cheaper than do- 
ing original construction, and (hey always come with 
instructions. 

Depending mi the materials yon choose — wood, 
metal or plastic— the only tools you will need are a 
hammer and a couple of screwdrivers. All the build- 
ing materials and fasteners are supplied in kits. As- 
sembly illicit take longer lhan an afternoon, but can 
easily be finished in a weekend. 

tf you have special storage needs you're probably 
belter off building your own shed. Draw out a de- 



tailed plan to make the project go quicker, especially 
when it comes to building roof trusses. 

Use pressure-treated lumber for the flooring, two- 
by-four studs and either Tl-1 1 plywood, fiberboard 
or cedar siding on (bewails. If you use fiberboard, 
make sure you seal, caulk and paint it immediately to 
prevent weather damage. liven with plywood or 
cedar siding, which are slightly more weather resis- 
tant lhan uupainted fiberboard, you should caulk 
and paint quickly. 

You won't need to wire the shed for electricity or 
install a window unless you plan lo use it for a work- 
room or mini-greenhouse. 

Size wise 

"Standard shed sizes range from 6x8 feel to 10x16 
feel, " said Orozco. Unless your yard is very small, go 
withal least an Jixfl foot shed because it will hold a 
lawnmower, wheelbarrow and decent assortment of 
household and garden tools," said Orozco. To make 
sure you buy the right size, measure a few of your 
largest tools before visiting stores, and then shop for 
shed kits where you can look at full-size displays. 
Small metal sheds will lasi eight to 10 years before 
(be bolls give way and the galvanized interior begins 
(o rust. If taken care of, wooden sheds should last as 
long as the house. The least expensive option, plastic, 
will last just five years. 



A firm foundation 

All sheds, whether prefab or homemade, require a 
foundation. For a small shed, you may be looking at a 
pair of wooden skids or precast concrete piers. For a 
unit that is larger than 100 square feel, you will need 
to pour a concrete slab. At that point, you may want 
to consider an oversize pad for storing such tilings as 
firewood. 

Duilding a shed is like erecting a small house. 
A base structure of beams and joists supports a 
suhfioor of plywood panels. Walls are framed 
and raised like house walls, with space letl foi 
doors and windows to be added later. The root 
goes on last. 

Racks and stacks 

Good organization within a shed, no matter the 
size, allows you to maximize space. A wall of peg- 
board can bold hand tools, shovels, rakes and lad- 
ders. Shelving units are also effective— especially for 
jars of screws, boxes of nails, oil cans and other mate- 
rials that can't be hung. 

Before beginning, check local building codes. 
These codes may require the type, size ami depth of 
foundation you will need, (he dimensions and the 
spacing beams, joists and rafters and the size shed 
you can build and where you can build it. 






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Home Improvement Guide 






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Inside.... 



Asian Lonchorned Beetle Questions . 
Solutions to pet odor problems . . . 
Seven tips for cleaning the bathroom 
Create a stress-Tree zone at hemic 
Don't forget to insulate ..... 

Lost in your laundry? Few hints 
Kitchen remodeling ........ 

Painting success . . 







William H. Schrocdcr — Publisher '■ 

Ncal Tucker — Operations Mgr. /Executive Editor 

Robert J. Schrocdcr — General Saks Mgr. 

Robert Ulmer — Display Sales M&r. 

Treasure lomal — Coyer Design 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



Knowledgeable, Friendly Staff 



Mill 

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Directions to Mill Creek Nursery: 41 North to Rte. 173 (Rosecrans) 
West to (1st Intersection) Mill Creek Rd., Left on gravel road 1/2 mile to Nursery Sign. 



Tall Home & Garden Improvement Section 



Asian Longhorned Beetle: Frequently asked Questions 




In Testation Data 



hy 



are trees being cut 
down in my neighborhood? 

Trees in your area may have been invaded by an insect called 
the Asian Longhorned beetle. Cutting and removing the infested 
trees is the only way to keep the beetle from spreading and attack- 
ing more trees in the United States. 

What happens to the trees after they, are cut? 

The tret's will be chipped and burned. ^VmI 

Why are trees being cut that are not dead? 

The beetle may be feeding inside a tree that looks healthy and must be 
stopped before it moves to another tree. Because the beetle kills trees slowly, it 
may take several years for a tree to die. 

Can chemicals be injected into the tree . 

to kill the beetle rather than cutting the trees?:' 

Chemicals that are injected into the tree do not penetrate beyond the outer 
most layers of the wood behind the bark. Since the beetle spends most of Its 
time deeper within the wood, it doesn't come Into contact with the injected 
chemicals. ' Vv . * . 

Can trees be saved by pruning 
only the infested branches? 

Since the beetle is feeding deep within the tree, It Is impossible to know *' 
which branches to remove. The beetle may be feeding in branches that look 
healthy. 

How can the beetle be 

prevented from doing more damage? 

The only way to stop the beetle from attacking even more trees Is to com- 
pletely rcmovo all trees with any.sigrt of the beeUe. In the spring, the beetles 
come out from Inside the tree where they have been feeding. Trees need to be"* 5 
removed before the beetles emerge and move to other trees. 

How did the beetle get here? 

Scientists aren't sure but its likely that the beetle 
arrived in wooden crating material on a ship deliv- 
ering goods from China. 

How long has the 
beetle been here? 

This beetle was discovered at two locations in 
New York (Brooklyn and Amityviile) in August 1996. 
Almost 2,000 infected trees have been found and re- 
moved. Officials in the New York Eradication Pro- 
ject arc still optimistic that the beetle will be elimi- 
nated. The infestation in Chicago was discovered 
on July 9th. 1998, but it may have arrived several 
years earlier. 




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What kind of trees 
does the beetle attack? 

The beetle attacks maple, horsechestnut, willow, poplar, birch, and rose of 
sharon. 

How will 1 know if my trees, 

or those in my neighborhood, have the beetle? 

You may see the beetle between May and October. It has a one-inch long 
bullet-shaped black body with white spots. The antennae can be two or three 
inches long with black and white stripes. In the fall and winter the beetle grub is 
feeding Inside the tree and can't be seen unless the tree is cut. 

How fast and how far can the beetle spread? 

We don't know much about this yet. The beetle doesn't usually move very 
far on Its' own. The likely way that the beetle will move is by people who trans- 
port It unknowingly — such as when moving firewood or branches that contain 
■ the beetle. 

Will anyone be looking for the beetle in my 
neighborhood after the trees are cut down? 

- , iSurvey crews will continue to look for signs of the beetle every year for the 
next four years, possibly longer. Any more trees found with the beetle will need 
to be removed vaj^B 

How can l.help? 

L l "If you think your tree or a neighborhood tree has the bee tic, do not move 
any cut wood including branches and stumps and do not put any of these mate- 
rials out for city removal. 
Instead, immediately contact: 

• The Department of Agriculture in your State 

• In Illinois, contact the Illinois Department of Agriculture hot- 1 ine number 
at: 1-800-641-3934. 

This brochure ivas prepared by the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area, Stat* and 
Private Forestry in cooperation with USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. 




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Fall Home & Garden Improvement Section 



Lakeland Newspapers / 3 



Solutions to pet odor problems 



n. „. ... 

1-^ No matter how many times the rugs 
have been shampooed and how 

1 much air freshener you use, animal 

urine (hat has penetrated and sul- 
lied in walls, doors and woodwork emits a linger- 
ing smell. Replacing carpeting and carpel padding 
can help, hut Tor homes thai have hardwood 
floors, and for those where the odor is more prob- 
lematic, here's a tip: finish the affected surfaces 
with shellac or a shellac-based primer-sealer. 

According to Win. Zinsser & Co., a leading man- 
ufacturer of shellac and specialty paint primers, 
shellac forms an impermeable barrier that per- 
manently seals off odors — something water-base 
and oil-base paints, primers and finishes can't do, 
Zinsser recommends die following treatments for 
surfaces around the home. 

• Hardwood floors — Seal the surface wiih clear 
or amber shellac, Zinsser makes a popular brand 
called Hulls Eye, which provides a long-lasting, 
beautiful finish and adheres to most types of exist- 
ing lloor finishes— including most polyurethanes. 

• Carpeted floors — Suhlloors hidden by car- 
peting can be sealed with clear shellac or painted 
with a shellac-based wbite-pigmenied primer like 
Zinsser's H-l-N I'rimer-Sealer, The primer, which 



Is tintabte to match the color of the carpeting, 
seals porous surfaces like oak flooring, plywood 
and concrete. 

• Walls and woodwork — Natural finished or 
stained woodwork and molding can he topcoat- 
ed with shellac. For walls and painted woodwork, 
prime the surface with H-l-N and follow with two 
coats of latex or oil-based finish paint. The 
primer will seal in any stains along with the 
odors, and provide a good "anchor" for the top- 
coat, making the paint job look better and last 
longer. The primer will slick to either flat or 
glossy-painted surfaces without the need for pri- 
or sanding. To make the job easier, have your re- 
tailer tint the primer to match the color of the 
finish paint. 

Shellac- based products are easy to use, and 
can be found at your local hardware store, home 
center or paint store. They dry fast and leave no 
lingering "paint smell" as they contain alcohol 
as a solvent, which dissipates very quickly into 
the air. Brushes clean up with regular household 
ammonia and water — there's no need for haz- 
ardous mineral-spirits solvents. 

l : or more information, visit the Zinsser web 
site at www.zinsser.com or call (7H2) 469- 
4 :t ti 7 . 




^ir 



SOX 2-*a£? 








To permanently seal off pet odors that have migrated into 
wood floors and subfloors beneath carpeting, seat the sur- 
face with shellac or a shellac-based primer. 




Fun facts about carpet 



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Approximately one billion square 
yards of carpeting— enough to create a 
runner stretching from the earth to the 
moon— is sold In the U.S. each year. Dol- 
lat value in 1998 was over SIS billion in 
retail sales, an increase over the year be- 
fore. Carpet is on the upswing thanks to 
greater variety, heller yarns, ever im- 
proving soil and stain protection, as well 
as more fashionable styling. Carpeting is 
so much a part of our lives, we some- 
times forget it's underfoot. It's lime to 
give this product the red-carpet treat- 
ment by recognizing some facts com- 
piled by3M. 



1. 70 percent of all carpeting sold in 
the U.S. is produced in Dalton, Georgia, 
the "Carpel Capital of the World." 

2. Erastus Iligelow, the "lather" of the 
American carpet industry, opened the 
first U.S. carpet mill in 1825; 

3. The first carpet with built-in soil 
protection was introduced over 25 years 
ago by WundaWeve featuring Scotchgard 
protection. (Scotchgard protection was 
used first on fabrics.) 

4. Carpeting is typically replaced every 
seven years. 

5. Families with kids and pels are the 
most likely to have staining problems. 



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TftinfQiijj of redecorating? \\/7^/^w{ 

Update your pictures itritfi new matting and frames. 



We're ready to help you with your holiday framing! 

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425 N. Lake Street, Mundelein, IL 60060 

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Fall I ionic & Garden Improvement Section 




Fall into the habit of planting 

spring bulbs 



M 

I I aye you ever envied a neigh* 

f I bor's yard that overflows with 

I I bright tulips and daffodils 

ever)* spring? Ever wished you 

had the time, tools and talent to do the 

same in your own yard? Well, get out your 

trowel because this year you're going to 

doit. 

Here's the big payoff. A couple of 
weekend hours this fall means a beauti- 
ful springtime yard for years to come. 



Bulbs arc perennials — they come back 
every year — and some even naturalize, 
meaning they multiply on their own. 

The most popular spring bulbs in- 
clude anemones, crocuses, daffodils, 
grape hyacinths, Iris, snowdrops and 
tulips. And while bulbs are traditionally 
associated with Holland, where most of 
the world's hardy spring flower bulbs are 
grown, most bulbs have their origins In 
the Middle East or Southern Europe, 
Prized and traded among emperors and 
kings, many bulbs were first introduced 
by soldiers returning from the Crusades 
who wanted to propagate exotic flowers 
in their native countries. 

Bulb basics 

Spring-blooming bulbs become 
available in garden centers and hardware 
stores in late summer. It Is a good idea to 
buy them early when the selection is best, 
and plant them as soon as the days get 
cooler. Assorted bulbs can be purchased 
in pre-packaged mesh bags or individu- 
ally. 

It helps to select bulbs the way you 
choose fresh fruit, according to Deb Welts 



Craft Show 
Listings 



October 16 
9 a.m. -4 p.m., Annual Craft Fair 
hosted by the Park City Seniors at 
the Park City Community Center, 
333 Teske Blvd. in Park City. 
Crafts, while elephant sale and raf- 
fle. For more details, call Sue at 
263-8069 or Madeline at 249-501 7. 

October 16 

9 a.m.-4 p.m., Annual Craft show 
held at St. Mark Lutheran Church, 
1 822 E. Grand Ave. in Undcnhurst. 
For information, call Sue at 356- 
7326. 

October 23 & 24 

10 n.m.-l p.m., Arts & Crafts show 
held at the Lake County Fair- 
grounds, U.S. 45 & Rte, 120 in 
uraystake. 

November S & 6 
Frl, 4-8 p.m., Sal. 9 a.m. -3 p.m., 
1 999 Holiday Bazaar held at Com- 
munity Protestant Church, corner 
of Hawley & Prairie In Mundelcln. 
Handcrafted gifts and decora- 
tions, bakery and candy shop. 

November 6 & 7 
Sut. 9 a.m. -4 p.m., Sun. 1 1 a.m. -4 
p.m., Holiday Craft Show held at 
the V.F.W. Post #4551, 75 North 
Ave. In Antioch. For info., call 395- 
6934. 

November 19-21 
Holidny Folk Fair held at Wiscon- 
sin Slate Fair Park. 8100 West 
Greenfield Ave. In West Allis. Wl. 
Directions from points south: 
Take 1-94 north (toward down- 
town Milwaukee), then 1-94 west 
(toward Madison). Turn right 
(south) onto 84th Street. En- 
trances to park will be on your left. 



Win A Gift 

Certificate 

To One Of The Following: 

Air Services 

Vertical Blinds 

Leath Furniture 

Lester's 

Nu-Diamond Glass 

Mundelein Frame House 

Schmidt Implement 

Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 • Grayslake, IL 60030 

By October 25, 1999 

Name: ■ ' 



Address: 

City/State/Zip: 
Phone: ■■ 



of the Home Depot. 

"Choose fat bulbs that aren't mushy 
when they're squeezed," She says. "I also 
tike to smell the bulbs. If they have an 
odor of mildew or rot, the bulbs probably 
won't make It through the winter." 

Gardening I0I 

Hulb planting is a relatively simple 
procedure, provided the gardener has the 
right tools: a trowel, a gardener's knee 
pad, bone meal and a sense of good tim- 
ing. In the north, spring bulbs are usual- 
ly planted between mid-September and 
early November, before the ground 
freezes. Once in the ground, bulbs func- 
tion like factories, storing and processing 
their own food through the cold winter 
months. 

In warm climates, spring bulbs can 
be more challenging go gardeners since 
the winters are not cold enough to make 
many bulbs to dormant. It is best for 
southern gardeners to store their bulbs, 
package and all, in the refrigerator any- 
where from four to eight weeks before 
planting. This will give them a chance to 
"chill out" before going Into the garden In 




early spring. 

"Make sure there is no ripening fruit 
in the refrigerator with the bulbs," says 
Wells. "The fruit can give off bulb-dam- 
aging gases." 

Traditionally bulbs are planted by 
digging a hole about three times the 
depth of the bulb itself. A mixture of 
compost and bone meal is added to the 
bottom of the hole before the bulb is 
placed into it root side down. Bulbs pre- 
fer sunny areas with well-drained soil. If 
soil appears a little too wet, mix in a lit- 
tle sand to promote more effective 
drainage. 

Planting bulbs in a shady area is fine 
as long as the trees are deciduous. For a 
landscaped look, arrange the bulbs in 
groupings— a few widely spaced for the 
larger flowers, several closer together for 
smaller ones. 

One of the reasons bulb gardening is 
so popular, is that the planted areas are 
usually low maintenance. However, there 
are some advantages to topping the beds 
with compost or a 5-10-5 fertilizer in the 
fall and again in the early spring. Deep 
watering also is a good idea if the summer 
has been particularly dry. 



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Fall Home & Garden Improvement Section 



Lakeland Newspapers / 5 



Seven simple cleaning tips for the bathroom 



No room in tin- house gets dirty raster than 
the bathroom. When you consider the 
busy traffic (if an entire household, and 
the tough dirt that accumulates through- 
out tlu> day, it's no Wonder that bathroom 
cleaning can give pause to even the heart!* 
est ol homemakcrs. 

To make cleaning easier, home-care expert Gerry 
l.uepke offers the following lips on tackling the bath- 
room, all at once or just one area at a time. 

Dtiathcr up the supplies that pertain to the area yon 
are cleaning: 

• ('lean rags, a soli sponge, toilet howl brush 

• Rubber gloves 

• A multi-purpose glass cleaner 

• A special product for toilet howl cleaning 

• A specialty product designed to clean mineral de- 
posits, such .is Professional Strength I.ime-a-Way lime. 
Calcium, ailtl host (Meaner. 

• A product for removing mildew 

Note: Know your surfaces: with all the time and mon- 
ey people spend on hatluoom fixtures, being aware of 
which products are safe for certain surfaces is very 
important. He careful when using cleaning products 
on marble, granite, slate. terra/./.o and natural stone 
surfaces. The best advice, according to l.uepke, is 
when in doubt, test ii out. Use the product according 
to instructions and test a small area hidden Irom view. 
Evaluate your results alter rinsing the area and letting 
it dry. 

2) The removal of mineral deposits from faucets, 



showers, bathtubs, and toilet bowls is one of the most 
important jobs when cleaning the bathroom. You will 
recognize these deposits as either a white film, a crusty 
scale or rusty colored stains. The primary cause of the 
build-up of these minerals is hard water. 

According to l.uepke, nearly 9 out of 10 households 
have some degree of hard water. With gallons of water 
passing tli rough the bathroom everyday, stains and nist 
can develop quickly and heavily. "The removal of these 
minerals is fast and easy with a product like I.imc-a- 
Way, which is safe for septic tanks and plumbing sys- 
tems." Luepke notes the following areas and objects as 
ones to target with I.ime-a-Way: 

•Shower doors— To remove stains and film. lJme-a-Way 
will also remove buildup from vinyl shower curtains. 

• Shower heads — Detach the showerhead and soak 
in Lime -a -Way. Rinse and replace the showerhead hack 
into the shower. 

•Sink/ faucet screens- Remove the screen and soak 
in Lime-a-Way, rinse and replace, (works great on 
kitchen and laundry sinks too). 

• Chrome faucets-Spray with I.ime-a-Way and re- 
place the shine to dulling faucets. Rinse thoroughly and 
dry with a soft cloth. 

• Spray l.hne-a-Way on just about any surface that 
has hard water stains (hut remember, when in doubt, 
try it out). 

•("lean or replace soap dishes or dispensers as well. 

:\) Use I.ime-a-Way Toilet Bowl Cleaner to remove 
rust ami hard water stains. Using lire unique curved 
neck on l.tme-a-Way Toilet Bowl Cleaner, dispense the 




product under (he 
toilet bowl rim. The 
product will seep 
down the sides of the 
toilet bowl coating It 
evenly, brush with a 
toilet brush and flush 
to rinse. 

•t) As long as you 
are cleaning the 
shower, take time to 
combat mildew. 

Mildew builds up in 
showers and on No room in the house gets dirty 

manv vinvl shower ^ asler * nan me bathroom. When 

„ you consider the traffic of an un- 
curtains (as well as * . , , .,_ 

tire household, and the dirt that 

hatluoom window accumulates throughout the day, 

curtains). it's no wonder that bathroom 

To wash away cleaning can give pause to even 

mildew on shower the heartiest of homemakers. 

tiles and shower cur- 
tain liners, use a special cleaning agent, such as Scrub 
Free Mildew Remover. Follow the directions on the pro- 
duct's container and put it away as soon as you are fin- 
ished. Like all cleaning products, remember to store it 
away from children and pets. Clean up any spills as 
soon as possible. 

What is usually the smallest room in the house can 
he the hardest to clean, but with these tips from Gerry 
l.uepke an autumn cleanup can be quick, easy, and re- 
warding. 



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6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



fall I lomc & Garden Improvement Section 



Create a stress-free zone at home Mulch Rings for Trees improves health 



Overwhelmed consumers arc 
looking for stress- free zones, 
and many are building them 
right into their homes— in ihe 
shape of sun rooms and solnri- 
tuns. Home designers are tuned into the 
words "cocoon ing" and "nesting" and are 
creating relaxing In-Home respites for resi- 
dents across the country. 

'Sunrooms put people hack in touch with 
nature, and fill their lives wilh warm, refresh- 
ing sunlight," said one designer. Sunrooms 
surround you with a soothing view and help 
to dissipate the pressures of die day. 

"We're seeing large, airy great rooms with 
expansive windows replacing formal living 
rooms, as well as more focus on outdoor liv- 
ing environments such ;is decks and sun- 
rooms," says Hick tones, president of Patio 
Enclosures inc., North America's largest sun- 
room manufacturer. In fact, a study hy Patio 
Enclosures Inc. shows that the number one 
reason for adding a sunroom (reported by 56 
percent of respondents) is for "a place to re- 
lax." 

Bringing die outdoors in via sunrooms lets 
you enjoy natural sunlight and nighttime 
skies and is die trend that fulfills the need to 
reduce stress. Sunlight has proven to in- 
crease our energy level as much as 24% ac- 
cording to Current Health magazine. It also 
activates the inactive Vitamin 1 ) in our sys- 
tems, which are often referred to as the "sun- 
shine vitamin" for its many therapeutic ben- 
efits. Furthermore, experts agree (hat a 
cliange in environment and connecting with 




Overwhelmed consumers are looking 
for stress-free zones, and many are 
building them right into their homes — 
in the shape of sunrooms and solari- 
ums. Home designers are tuned into 
the words "cocooning" and "nesting." 

nature often helps us to decrease our stress 
level. 

To create a relaxing environment in your 
home, start with one room, or add on just for 
this purpose. "We like to think that sunrooms 
are ideal rooms for stress relief," says Jones. 
The expansive glass, view of nature and all- 
around special feeling they provide that's 
unique from the rest of the house make these 
rooms perfect for relaxing." Sunrooms can be 
easily added onto a home or created by en- 
closing an existing patio or deck. 

In decorating your room for relaxing, 
choose natural, comfortable fabrics in sooth- 



Homeowners and professional 
arborists depend on mulches 
in landscapes for several rea- 
sons. Functionally, mulches 
discourage weeds from grow- 
ing conserve moisture during periods and al- 
low belter use of water by controlling runoff 
and increasing water-holding capacity of 
light, sandy soils. 

Mulches help maintain a uniform soil tem- 
perature. A 2- to - 4-inch layer of mulch can 
add to the aesthetic value of a garden while 
protecting the base of trees from being in- 
jured by mechanical equipment. 

Mulch rings also decrease competition 
from lawn grass, especially when well main- 
tained, robs trees of valued nutrients and 
moisture. 

Many organic materials can be used as a 
mulch. Bark mulches and wood chips are the 
two commonly used mulches in most of the 
country. In the south, pine needles are in- 
cluded in that list. 

Mulch can be applied just about any time of 
the year when trees and shrubs are being 
planted. The best time to apply mulch in es- 
tablished bed areas, however, would be in 
mid-spring when soil temperature has 
warmed up enough for sufficient root growth. 
If applied earlier, the mulch could lower soil 
temperature and delay root growth. 

Mulches should be applied 2 to 4 inches in 
depth over relatively clean, weed-free soils. 
Never pile mulch more than 4 inches high. 
Identify and eradicate weeds before the 
mulch is applied. Do not allow mulch to 



touch tree trunks, keep mulch hack about G 
to 12 inches. 

Most arborists consider organic mulches as 
the most compatible with trees. There arc, 
however, several inorganic materials used as 
mulches, including weed barriers. Black plas- 
tic is sometimes used to discourage weeds, 
though it interferes with the normal oxygen 
and water supply to the tree's roots. Plastic 
barriers can contribute to the creation of a 
very shallow root system, which, during 
drought periods, make plants less capable of 
obtaining water or withstanding heat stress. 
Therefore, it is not recommended to use 
black plastic around trees. There arc, how- 
ever, several landscape fabric mulch prod- 
ucts available that will function in the same 
way as plastic but allow for normal water and 
oxygen exchange! These materials are placed 
on bare soil around trees and shrubs with the 
mulches used on top. There are many brands 
and types of materials from which to choose 
that have proven to be beneficial in discour- 
aging weeds and holding soil moisture. 

For a list of professional arborists in your 
area, or to get information on the care and 
maintenance of trees, contact the National 
Arbortst Association, I -800-733-2622 or con- 
duct your own zip code search on the NAA's 
web site, http://www.NATLAKB.com. The 
NAA is a 60-year-old public and profession- 
al resource on trees and arboriculture. Its 
more than 2.300 members all recognize 
stringent safety and performance stan- 
dards, and are required to carry liability in- 
surance. 




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As you gear-up for winter, don't forget to insulate 




inter is not far away, and many consumers need help when it conies to 
milking decisions about home insulation and reducing healing costs. 
Johns Manvillt* offers the following insulation tips for homeowners and 
do-it-yourselfers to make the insulation selection and installation much 
easier. Remember to check with your local retailer for the correct H-val- 
uc for your area. 

•What Is An It-Value? AH insulation comes with something called an H-value. 
This is a rating that indicates the resistance value, which measures a material's resis- 
tance to beat How. The higher the It-value, the greater the insulating quality. The li- 
vable is marked oti the insulation packaging. 

•Where Should I lumeowners Insulate? Insulate attics, ceilings, walls, floors and 
crawl spaces to maximize energy savings and comfort. 
Attics/Ceilings: 

Attics and ceilings should include 10 to I ft inches of insulation. If you choose to 
insulate your attic/ceiling or add more insulation, for best results install insulation 
baits between the ceiling joists, keep the insulation away from any beat-generating 
fixtures, exhaust Hues and attic ventilators to avoid a Tire hazard. 
Walls: 

People who live in older homes with little or no insulation in the walls can often 
save a lot ot money by retrofitting insulation. The most common method is tohlow in- 
sulation into the home's exterior walls 
through holes drilled into each stud cav- 
ity. 

Floors/Crawl Spaces: 
When insulating under floors, you 
can install insulation from below or 
from above if the sub-floor has not vet 




been installed, lobns Manville Comfort - 
a Thcrm ,M Under Root Fiber Glass Insu- 
lation is specifically designed for under 



FALL FURNITURE FESTIVAL 




Did you know that Techline is a leader in the Soho area? No, 
not that trendy district in New York City. S.O.H.O. as in small 
office-home office. No matter if you have a niche, corner or a 
room, we can help you create an attractive, functional 
S.O.H.O. just for you. 

There's no better time to get started on your S.O.H.O. or any 
other needful area of your home. Our fall furniture festival is 
now in progress. Save 10% to 50% on furniture lighting and 
accessories now thru October 30th, 

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floor application and features easy-to-use stapling flanges, eliminating the need for 
wire or lacing insulation support. To insulate crawl space walls, lake long wooded strips 
and nail over insulation to the sill. 

•What tools will you need? 

Working with fiber glass insulation requires no special tools. All you need is a tape 
measure, a utility knife and a staple gun. You should wear long-sleeved, loose-fitting 
clothing, gloves and eye protection. Also, use a respirator mask approved for fiberglass 
protection. 

•What additional weather-proofing can be done? Homeowners can also add to 
the winlerization of their homes by caulking and installing weather striping around 
windows and doors, scheduling a healing-system tune-up, cleaning furnace filters and 
installing storm doors and windows. 




032848 



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Revolutionary deck surface 
eliminates maintenance and 
health risks from j/our deck 

A deck is a great addition to any home and can be a popular area lor family activi- 
ty, however, regular staining and sealing o| its wood can be expensive — up to SI ,lii»U 
a year for common-size decks. In addition to the cost of maintenance, wood decks even 
can pose health risks. 

Now, there is a revolutionary solution to these problems with Durable Deck — an 
innovative product that does not replace your old deck, but instead covers it in a 
durable, safe and attractive vinyl. 

Most decks are made of treated wood, which can deteriorate quickly and look tin- 
sightly unless routinely pressure-washed and sealed using expensive stains and water- 
repellent sealers, What's more, the chemicals used io pressure- 1 rent lumber contain 
toxins, which can pose health risks and raise environmental issues. Finally, there's the 
classic health risk — a wood sliver or riisty nail protruding from the deck can penetrate 
the skin and can cause a serious infection. 

Durable Deck eliminates these common maintenance and health problems safely, 
conveniently and affordably. This revolutionary new product protects much the way 
vinyl siding does by installing directly over the wood — keeping its surface safe from 
the destructive forces of moisture and U.V. radiation. Many carpenters know that treat- 
ed wood actually can get stronger with age. So, even if your deck's surface is weathered 
and unsightly, the wood beneath it still may be structurally strong, by adding the prod- 
uct, you're adding years more life to your deck's wood — helping you save money while 
preserving the forests. Durable Deck vinyl planks can be quickly and easily fastened to 
the deck with screws or a special polyureihane adhesive. 

The ideal solution to top a backyard deck. dock, walkway, porch or patio, Durable 
Deck also provides pool-deck and dock owners die added safety ol a slip-resistant sur- 
face. It even can be installed over concrete, covering unsightly cracks and irregular sur- 
faces. Similar to vinyl siding, the product is made from a GEONTM I'VC compound 
material proven to withstand punishing outdoor conditions. 

Finally, because Durable Deck is a retrofit product and requires no structural 
change to a home, a building permit is not needed in most areas and easily can be in- 
stalled bv either the homeowner or a contractor. 



8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



Fall Home & Garden Improvement Section 



Lost in your laundry? Here are a few hints 






T 

i imcs have certainly changed when it 

1 comes to washing etothes. Long gone are 

the days of hand washing garments and 
f hanging them out to dry in the hackynrd. 

Willi the seemingly hundreds of prod- 
ucts out there, choosing a detergent is more complex 
than ever. Rut what do all those advertising slogans 
mean? And will anything really get clothes cleaner? 
Don't forget about all those garments with special 
needs. Home care expert Gerry Luepke offers the fal- 
lowing definitions and hints that even experienced 1 aim - 
derers might need to know. 
Which Detergent Is Best for Me? 

With so many to choose from, it's hard to decide on 
whether to use a powder or liquidate. Here's some ad- 
vice from Lucpke: 

•Liquid vs. Powder Liquids work best on food, greasy, 
oily and everyday dirt. Powders are most effective on 
ground-in dirt and clay, making it an ideal choice if you 
have children playing outside all day. Use a liquid de- 
tergent for everyday laundry. 

•Ultra: The super hero of detergents? Not quite. Ultra 
simply means concentrated. These detergents do have 
their benefits: they come in smaller packages and re- 
quire less detergent to be used per load. 

•Combinations: These may include an added fabric 
softener, color-safe bleach or color protectors. The main 
benefit of these detergents is that they are cheaper than 
buying two different products. According to Luepke, the 
downside of these combinations is that the detergent 
may not clean as well and the bleach or fabric softener 
might not be as effective as they would be if they were 
put in the laundry separately. 

•Fragrance or Dye Pree: The perfumes or dyes have 



been removed from a number of detergents. For those 
who have sensitivities these are great products. 
The Hard Truth About Water 

Hard water is a problem in as many as 90% of homes, 
according Luepke. Hard water contains high amounts 
of minerals such as lime, magnesium and calcium that 
can interfere with a detergents' effectiveness. In addi- 
tion, fabrics tend to wear out more quickly and colors 
fade faster. It has also been found that washing ma- 
chines using hard water wear out more rapidly. 

"A liquid or powder water softener is one product that 
you should have In the laundry room," says Luepke. She 
suggests Calgon Water Softener as a good choice. "Wa- 
ter softeners placed in the wash help detergents clean 
better by neutralizing the minerals that make water 
hard. By adding them to the wash cycle, the detergent is 
able to do its job completely." Luepke also notes that 
hard water minerals trap dirt into fabrics and build-up 
on clothes as soap scum. A water softener like Calgon 
will remove the minerals for much cleaner clothes. 
Additional Products 

Bleach: Add to the wash to sanitize and remove stub- 
born stains. Bleaches arc available in cither Chlorine or 
Oxygen formulas. Be sure to follow the label directions. 
Read garment labels as well; if something is not color- 
fast, there's no turning back. 

Fabric Softeners: These add-ins can decrease static 
cling, reduce wrinkles and drying time, and make 
clothes softer and fluffier. Fabric Softeners come in 
many forms, but Luepke suggests using them in the dry- 
er in the form of dryer sheets. This way, they won't have 
to be added during the rinse cycle of the wash (and you 
won't have to check in on your laundry every ten min- 
utes). 




Times have certainly changed when it comes to 
washing clothes. With the seemingly hundreds of 
products out there, choosing a detergent is more 
complex than ever. But what do all those advertis- 
ing slogans mean? And will anything really get 
clothes cleaner? 

Stain Removers: Available in liquids, sprays and 
sticks. For best results, treat stains as soon as possible 
according to product directions. 
Sorting It All Out 

When it comes to sorting your laundry, there are some 
common mistakes that people make. "A lot of people 
think that doing one load of all jeans or all sweatshirts is 
the best thing, but it's not," says Luepke. In fact, the best 
thing to do is to mix and match items to ensure thor- 
ough washing for all fabrics and colors. 




, VWt us on the internet at uwvftinjctcorn : ; i- | <«»"»«»» L 



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Fall Home & Garden Improvement Section 



Lakeland Newspapers / 9 



• 



N 



Kitchen remodeling is recipe for success 



Assuming you could ufford only one home improvement project, which 
of the following would give you the oust return on your investment while 
increasing space and updating your home's appearance? 
- Adding on n separate room? 
- Finishing your basement? 
- Remodeling your kitchen? 

According to a 1998 report from the Harvard University Joint Center for Housing Stud- 
ies, kitchen remodeling has an 07 percent average potential payback — among the high- 
est of all home improvement projects. Statistics from the National Kitchen and Rath As- 
sociation and the National Association of Home Remodels place that figure even higher 
at 120 percent. Compare that to the resale returns on a separate unit addition or finished 
basement, which offer 40 percent and 52 percent paybacks, respectively. 

"As any real estate agent will tell you, adding a contemporary, efficient kitchen to an 
older, charming home creates a very attractive — and marketable; — real estate pack- 
age," said Jeff Dorn, senior vice president of Kitchen Tune- Up, which specializes in re- 
conditioning and refacing existing cabinets as well as new custom cabinetry. "Kitchens 
are of paramount importance to today's demanding home buyers." 

According to the Joint Center report, Americans spend approximately S 150 billion 
on residential remodeling projects per year, accounting for more than 2% of the na- 
tion's Gross Domestic Product. 

Approximately 25 million homeowners undertake some type of home improvement 
project each year, with 1 1 percent of households with incomes of $100,000 or more rep- 
resenting almost a quarter of all related expenditures. 

The report also found that one in 10 homeowners spends more than $5,000 a year in 
remodeling, with more than 75 percent of homeowners reporting a home improve- 
ment within two years of having a child. 

Homebuyers tend to spend an average or $2,000 more on remodeling during the 
first 24 months after purchase than non-movers, and trade- up buyers spend three times 




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Assuming you could afford only one home improvement project, which would 
give you the best return on your Investment while Increasing space and up- 
dating your home's appearance? 

more than first- time buyers. 

Through the year 2010, the annual average growth In remodeling expenditures is 
projected at two percent. Kitchen remodeling looks to be no exception. 

"In today's strong economy of solid employment growth, high consumer confidence 
and increased home sales, there's never been a better time to remodel your kitchen." 
added Dom. "We see that trend continuing in the future, particularly as baby boomers 
age and the 'do-it-yourselfers' turn to professional contractors such as Kitchen Tune- 
Up. With their leisure time at a premium, more and more consumers are discovering 
that they no longer have the time — or inclination — to tackle home improvement pro- 
jects, and prefer to utilize the services of a well-established, customer- focused compa- 
ny like ours." 

Founded in 1975, Kitchen Tune-Up, n division of KTU Worldwide Inc., is u tccor- 
nized leader in a 30-billion-dollar industry and has been recognized as the No, 1 rated 
home improvement franchise by Entrepreneur magazine for nine of the past ten years. 
With its motto of "Kitchen Solutions for Any Budget," Kitchen Tune- Up specializes not 
only in reconditioning, refacing and recoating existing cabinets, but also in new cus- 
tom cabinetry, shelf lining, replacement hardware, wood care and furniture touch-up 
services. 

All services are personalized to meet individual decorating preferences and bud- 
getary requirements following an initial consultation in the client's home, in a Kitchen 
Tune-Up Design Studio, or in a full-service Kitchen Tune-Up Idea Center in a retail 
shopping center. 

Visit their Web site at www.kitchentuneup.com. 




New look for Lakeland homes 

Becoming popular as an option for upscale Lakeland homes is the fourth bed- 
room that functions more like a second master suite. The second/master 
bedroom is ideal for families with an older live-in relative or an adult-aged 
child seeking privacy. Master suite sitting room provides a variation on sec- 
ond 'master' concept. At the opposite spectrum is the compact townhome 
with 'spacious' design offering a compact kitchen with convenient combined 
family room-entertainment center. Townhomes are ideal for first-time buyers, 
single persons or empty nesters who seek down-sizing with amenities. 



I 0/ Lakeland Newspapers 



rail Home & Garden Improvement Section 



■ 



-i 

4 



Painting success lies in the 







ou've liiiiilly decided to change that white in the living room to eggshell. Or and mnsking (ape for painting 

maybe that rose you loved so much in your hedroom isn't so rosy anymore, around windows and trim. 

Whatever the case, the decision has been made to paint. While many people Don't skimp on the prc-paint- 

fcel that (hey are experts at Interior painting, there is an important step that ing duties: have a plan and 



stick to it. 

'5^ Two painters will make 
the job go faster, so recruit a 
painting partner if you can. 
*(£ Take this time to clean 
the room's windows. This 
will get rid of excess dirt and 
dust in the room and also 



is usually forgotten: cleaning all surfaces in the room about to be painted. 
"Most people want to jump right into painting and get that new color onto their 
walls," says home care expert Gerry Lucpke. "They do not take the lime to clean up 
before hand, but cleaning is extremely important." According to Lucpke, cleaning the 
grime off of walls and surfaces prior to painting will aid in the adhesion and life of the 
paint. If proper cleaning is not done, the paint has a better chance of peeling or even 
cracking. 

Painting is one of the top home improvement projects done by homeowners, and 
interior painting is a project that anyone can take on. Luepke offers the following allow for you to enjoy the 
cleaning lips for anyone who has chosen lo begin a painting job. true look of your painting 

| You don't have to spend money on dozens of cleaning products. All you really job! Don't forget to clean 
need is a multi-purpose cleaner like Soilax. "It is ideal for pre-paint cleaning." says the doors and light fix- 
Luepke, "It is safe for woodwork, latex or oil point, wallpaper and vinyl." Use I /4 cup tures, too. 
Soilax for a gallon of writer Mix this solution in a bucket or container and use any clean Taking this time before- 
rag f>r sponge to wipe down surfaces prior to painting. Clean all walls, trim, doors, and hand to clean up grime 
window frames. from all surfaces will en- 

2 Before you clean, check walls and woodwork of the room about to be painted, sure an easier clean up after the painting job is finished, leaving you with more time 
Look at the room in daylight and on a sunny day if possible (this way, you'll be able to to enjoy the beauty of your newly painted room. 




While many people feel that they are experts 
at interior painting, there is an important step 
that is usually forgotten: cleaning all surfaces 
In the room about to be painted. 



catch everything}. Look for cracks and chips and repair them accordingly. 

3 If (here are no chips in (he woodwork of a room, and you plan on painting it the 
same color, you may be able m wash the woodwork and forget the paint. A thorough 
cleaning with a Soilax solution can freshen up the look of woodwork about as well as 
a fresh co.it of paint. 

4 Allow for ample time to clean and prepare beforehand. Give yourself enough 
time to gather supplies: brushes, rollers, pans, old sheets to cover furniture, a ladder 

Bongi opens new display models 
at Lakeside Condominiums 

Bnngi Homes has created two new furnished display models to launch the second 
and final phase of Lakeside Condominiums, the company's resort-style condomini- 
um complex on the south shore of 300-acrc Hangs Lake in Wauconda. 

The new models, created by interior designer Valerie Bongiovanni., feature a two- 
bedroom, two-bath Brittany plan and a one-bedroom, two-bath Colonade. 

The Palatine-based builder has redesigned and completely modernized two three- 
story buildings to create 48 resort-style one-or- two-bedroom homes. Seven plans 
are available, priced from $l25.!)tH) to Slltf/JOO. 



Ml 114 VI IliMSIMHI* Ml 114 II 1 1 ISI \ 



For more tips and information, you can contact Gerry Luepke at (800) 284-2023. 



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1425 Peterson Road. 
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847-573-0700 

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847-797-0909 

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U&l&er 8-14,1999 






Chevy Venture expands its lineup with a 
new value van and Warner Bros, edition 



Venture continues to be the mini- 
van for active families in the 
year 2000, offering a new 
Warner Bros. Edition, Value Van 
model and new radios. 

One of the more colorful additions in 
the history of Chevy Trucks is the new 
Warner Bros. Edition. Available as an Ex- 
tended Wheclbase Four-Door model, this 
fun, attractive package Is designed with the 
active family in mind, and combines the 
strengths of Chevy Venture's family trans- 
portation with the power of Warner Bros. 
Family Entertainment, Unique features In- 
clude an overhead flip-down LCD video 
monitor, a console-mounted stereo video 
cassette player with remove, and light- 
weight flip and fold modular bucket seats 
for the second and third rows. 

This exciting model also includes ex- 
clusive leather seating surfaces with cloth 
inserts for a comfortable driving experi- 
ence. The Warner Bros. Edition exterior 
features color-keyed body-side moldings, 
fascias and door handles. Complementing 
the exterior Is chrome Venture and Warner 
Bros. Family Entertainment badging. 

"We're excited about the new Warner 
Bros. Edition Van," said Venture Brand 
manager Dan Keller. "It's a fun, compre- 
hensive entertainment package for the 
whole family, wrapped in Venture comfort 
and durability." 

Returning to the Concept: Cure effort 
for a second consecutive year. Nicholas 
Graham for Joe Boxer transformed a 



~ TEST DRIVE TBE 


CHEVROLET VENTURE 2000 


BERNARD CHEVROLET 


' 1001 S. Milwaukee Ave., Ubertyville 


362-1400 


RAY CHEVROLET 


39 N. Route 12, Fox Lake 


587-3300 


RAYMOND CHEVROLET 


120 W. Route 173, Antloch 


, 395-3600 


i ROCKENBACH CHEVROLET 


1000 E. Belvidere Rd., Grayslake 


223-8651 



■'■ ' •■* - ■•" 



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■ 



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1 



2000 
VENTURE 

•.ENGINE: 3400 0HVV6 

• TRANSMISSION: Standard 4- 
speed electronically controlled 
automatic with overdrKe and 
torque converter 

•FUEL ECONOMY: 18 city/ 25 
highway 

• BRAKES: Power-assisted, vent- 
ed front disc/rear drum w/4- 
wheelABS 

• DIMENSIONS: Length: 186.9 
in.; Width: 72 inches; Wheel- 
base: 112 inches 

MSRP BASE PRICE: 

20,650 
1999 FEATURE 
HIGHLIGHTS 

•Warner Bros. Edition 
•New fabric pattern: Medium 

Gray and Neutral 
•Redesigned instrument cluster 

guages 




Chevy Venture mlnivan into the ultimate 
New York taxi complete with llckey face 
scats, an entertainment center, juke box 
on the dashboard and hand compartments 
for a week's supply of Joe Boxer under- 
wear. The signature Joe Boxer colors of 
bright yellow, black and white adorn the 
vehicle, inside and outside. 

The Chevy Venture Minivan and Joe 
Boxer fashions have a lot in common. 
"The Venture minivan is for active families 
who need to get more done and have 
more fun," said brand manager Dan Keller. 




Please see VENTURE / D3 2000 CHEVROLET VENTURE 



LeSabre offers safety, luxury 



For the 2000 model year, Buick's 
LeSabre Brand Team set out to 
take a great car and make it bel- 
ter. And Improvements are con- 
tinuing in (he all new version of LeSabre, 
the best-selling U.S. full-size sedan for 
seven straight years. 

The 2000 LeSabre was introduced as 
an early 2000 model. Mid-model year im- 
provements began with the addition of 
StabiliTrak as an option (May 1999), mak- 
ing LeSabre the highest volume car on 
the market. to offer this advanced intc- 

— gr*»eti j vghiclg"atntal Hiy i,uiin» t'»yM«tni~~ 

StabiliTrak helps (he driver maintain 
control by electronically comparing what 
the driver wants the car to do with infor- 
mation from sensors Indicating how the 
car is actually responding. If the car is in 
danger of sliding or skidding, StabiliTrak 
slows and stabilizes the car to help the 
driver maintain control. 

While StabiliTrak's benefits are most 
obvious when roads are wet. snowy or 
icy, the system also assists the driver dur- 
ing evasive or emergency maneuvers. The 
system functions at any speed and is al- 
ways operational, requiring no user acti- 
vation. 

LeSabre Brand Manager Joseph J. 
Fitzsimmons Jr. said Buick's main chal- 
lenge in creating an all-new LeSabre 
sedan for the 2000 model year was simply 
this: How do you improve one of the 
most successful automobiles on the mar- 
ket? 

LeSabre's status as the best-selling 
U.S. full-size car for seven straight years 
was a strong indicator it was already pro- 
viding a successful blend of attributes: 
roomy comfort, smooth power, quality, 
safety and security. Basically, Fitzsim- 
mons said, customers saw the six-pas- 
senger LeSabre as an outstanding value. 

So when it came time for a new mod- 
el, product planners were determined to 
keep LeSabre's regular customers happy. 
At the same time, they wanted to widen 
its appeal. The result — the 2000 LeSabre 
— has numerous new features designed 
to strengthen LeSabre's position as a pre- 
mium sedan for traditional American 
families. 

"However, the main feature of the 
2000 LeSabre is not its list of innovations 
and improvements— though it's an im- 
pressive list — but the overall package 
designed to continue the winning formu- 
la," said Fitzsimmons. 

"From the exterior styling that Is ele- 
gant and pleasing— timeless rather than 
gimmicky — to the very popular 3800 Se- 
ries II V-G engine and the new stronger 
body structure, this LeSabre is designed 
to attract a targe number of customers 
who want an upscale, roomy, comfort- . 
able and safe car with classic styling — 
and also a great value." 

Pointing out the car's excellent repu- 
tation, he noted LeSabre for 1998 again 
won the prestigious "Family Car of the 



Year" award from Family Circle magazine 
and in recent years has received various 
quality (J.D. Power), safety (Kiplinger's 
magazine) and value (IntelliChoice, 
Strategic Vision, Car Guide, etc.) honors. 
In the summer of 1999, LeSabre was 
named a "Best Buy" by the Chicago Tribune 
and won the Good Housekeeping Institute 
Automotive Satisfaction Award. The Good 
Housekeeping award is based on customer 
satisfaction and recommendations Tor pur- 
chase and repurchase, 

"We're proud of all of them, but we're 

. fnusLpiuud-oUhc one that indicate* we 

arc truly meeting our customers' needs — 
and that's the best-seller award," Fitzsim- 
mons said. 

"We've sold more than one million 
LcSabres in the last eight years. Over that 
period, LeSabre has beaten all of our ma- 
jor competitors in retail sales — including 
Mercury Grand Marquis, Ford Crown Vic- 
toria, Chrysler Concorde, Dodge Intrepid, 
Toyota Avalon. That's a tremendous record 
of market success. 

"I think it's a combination of deliver- 
ing the right product features and right 
touches of comfort and luxury at the right 
price. LeSabre gives you a feeling of being 
in control and being secure — basically 
it's a car that provides peace of mind." 

For the 2000 model year, Fitzsimmons 
said, Buick set out to identify the features 
it would most like to improve by talking to 
customers. And then it improved them. As 
a result, the new model is stronger, qui- 
eter and more convenient and secure. It 
has, among a long list of improvements. 



side air bags for the driver and right front 
passenger, better ride and handling and 
more luggage capacity (and, on Limited, a 
pass-through between the trunk and rear 
seating for hauling long items). There is 
more stowage in the passenger compart- 
ment, new inset door handles, larger- 
gauges and larger outside rear-view mir- 
rors that arc hinged so they will fold if 
bumped. 

From an engineering standpoint. 
LeSabre's major news is its more substan- 
tial body structure, the latest generation 
■ of the unutuaMy strong architecture that 
earlier won prafsein Riviera (1995) and 
Park Avenue f 1997). 

Fitzsimmons said customers will no- 
tice a smoother, quieter ride, a more satis- 
fying sound when the doors close, and 
overall a more substantial "feel" created 
by the significant improvements in stiff- 
ness: 27 percent more resistance to bend- 
ing and a 62 percent gain in torsional 
rigidity. 

In addition, LeSabre's safety-cage con- 
struction combined with four air bags, 
balanced chassis design, energy absorb- 
ing surfaces and new anti-lock four-wheel 
disc brakes, with extra capacity for sure 
stopping, emphasize LeSabre's attention 
to safety — a key attribute for LeSabre 
buyers. 

Among other new safety features on 
LeSabres are Catche's Mitt seats — high- 
retention front scats with self-aligning 
head restraints. These features can en- 
hance the scat system performance in 
rear impact collisions. 




2000 Butck Lesabre 



D2 f Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



October 8, 1999 




wr» v.. CM 



i i n| 



Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



Cars for Salq - 



1904 CHRYSLER CEDAR- 
ON Convertible loaded, bluo, 
good condition. JS.OOO/bost. 
1988 Chryslor Conquest, rod, 
loaded, In good condition. 
S2,D00/bost. Ask for Wendy 
or Ray, (847)587-4762 

1985 CAPRICE' CLASSIC. 
Groat condition. 1987 Dolta 
'88 OldsmobllO. Child Cor- 
volleBod. (847)740-2013. 

DODGE 1991 SPIRIT, 
110,000 miles, good condl- 
tlon, $2,900. (847) 973-1425. 

CHEVROLET 1992 COR- 
VETTE, only 17,500 miles! 
Black Rose (purple), with gray 
leather Interior, Car alarm and 
phone Included. Beautiful carl 
$20,500/best. (815) 
675-9298. 

TOYOTA 1999 CAMRY 
XLE V6, gray/gray leather In- 
terior, automatic, 16K, security 
system, A/C, sunroof, am/fm 
CD cassette, $22,000. (847) 
265-2178. 

AUDI 1993 90CS QUAT- 
TRO SPORT, 2.8L V6, 5- 
spoed, 4WO, all power and 
luxury options, ABS, air bag, 
leather. Kelly book value over 
$1 6,500, sacrifice at $13,900. 
Call (647) 5480096. 

CADILLAC 1982 
OEVILLE, 4-door. 52,000 
original miles, black beauty, 
garage kept, must be seon. 
(414) 552-6646. 

CHEVROLET 1987 CAVA- 
LIER, runs great . heat, ask- 
Ing $700. (847)' 587-6239. 

CHEVROLET MONTE 

CARLO, 1975. Restored to 
showroom condition, all op- 
tlons. $6500. (414)B59-2424. 

CHEVY 1985 BLAZER, full 
sije, very good runner, 
SI. 450. (847)662-7583. 



CHEVY 1991 BERETTA, 

VG, well maintained. 
$2,200/bost. (847) 356-0973 
after 5pm> 

.'CHEVY'*' 'l991 BERETTA, 
86,000 milos, fair condition, 
but runs great, $2,900. 1989 
Yamaha Exciter snowmobile, 
good condition, $1,000. (847) 
740-2219. 

CHEVY 1991 CAVALIER, 
$3,995. CALL ED (847) 625- 
8400. 

CHEVY 1995 BERETTA 
Z26. loaded, plus alarm and 
CO changer, black, 71K high- 
way miles, now tires, excellent 
condition, 59,500/bcsi. (414) 
681-6471. 

CHEVY 1995 CAMARO 
RS, excellent condition, well 
maintained, low milos, loaded, 
T-lops, must sell, 
$10,200/best. (815) 
385-5736. 

CHEVY 1996 CORSICA, 
power steering, A/C, 73,000 
miles, $7,000. (414) 
862-9731. 

CHEVY 1997 MONTE CAR- 
LO, $13,995. CALL FRANK 
(847)816-6660. 

CHRYSLER 1989 CON- 
VERTIBLE, air, power wind- 
ows, cruise, standard trans- 
mission, silver, trip computer, 
newer top, $2,900. (414) 
694-3606. 

CHRYSLER 1994 CON- 
CORDE, new tiros, 3.5L V6, 
fully loaded, keyless remote, 
excellent condition, 
S8,000/best (Bluo Book 
$10,500). (847) 937-7081 
days, (847) 356-0447 even- 
ings. 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL Sale. Mustang, Cam- 
aro Nova, Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Pontial, Chevrolet 
morel Trunk Pans. Floor 
pans, Doors, Fenders, Bump- 
ers. New and California Rust 
Free. Marx Plating and supply 
217-824-6184 



DODQE 1994 SHADOW, 

$3,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

DODQE AVENGER ES 
1997, loaded, garage kept, 
sunroof, premium Infinity ster- 
eo, black, 27K milos, 
$14,700/bosl. (414) 

752-0491. , 

EAGLE TALON 1993, 
$4,995. CALL ED (847) 625- 
8400. 

EL CAMINO 1986 Candy 
Apple Rod, va, automatic, 
bucket seats, power windows 
and doors, $10,000, (414) 
694-3573, 6018 69th St. 

FORD 1996 THUNDER. 
BIRD, $8,995. CALL ED (847) 
625-8400. 

FORD 1962 FALCON, 
BLACK, now body work, 
clean Interior, 44K, black, 
$2,00O/bOSt. (414) 857-2063. 

FORD 1986 THUNDER- 
BIRD, V6. good first teenag- 
ers car, or auto buff, 
$1.100/best. (847) 487-5712. 

FORD 1988 THUNDER- 
BIRD power steering, power 
brakes, power locks, windows 
and mirrors, tilt wheel, AM/FM, 
$2.000. (847) 548-2958. 

FORD 1989 TAURUS LX 
WAGON. V6, all power, 
100,000 miles, well main- 
talned, 3rd. seal, $2,400. 
(847)918-8384. 

FORD 1990 FESTIVA, rod, 
5- spoed, 122K, runs great, 
$t,000/bost. (847) 740-6439, 

FORD 1992 TEMPO 
AM/FM cassette, powor W/L, 
A/C, power front scats, cruise 
control, now front brakes, de- 
pendable transportation, 
$2.600. (847) 548-2289. 

FORD 1993 MUSTANG 
LX, $5,995. CALL ED (847) 
625-8400. 

FORD 1993 TEMPO, excel- 
lent condition, lots of new 
items, $2,200/best. (815) 
337-6540. 



FORD 1994 PROBE SE, 
LOADED. Metallic coral 
paint, 3-T hlngos, 1 -owner, 
$6,600. SHARP! B249 26th 
Ave., Kenosha, (414) 
697-5669, (847) 774-7775. 

FORD 1998 ESCORT, 
$9,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

HYUNDAI 1995 ELAN- 
TRA, $3,995. CALL FRANK 
(847) 816-6660. 

INFINITY QX4 1997, 
$24,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
8166660. 

JAGUAR 1976 XJ6L, 4- 
door sedan, red/red toathor In- 
terior. Very good condition. 
Call Neil (847) 926-1900 ext. 
111. 

JAGUAR XJS CONVERT. 
IBLE 1990, 40,260 miles, no 
winters, dealer malntalnod, 
boautlful condition, $18,000. 
(847) 5875274. 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

If you need to placo an ad in 

Classified, call us at 

(847) 223-8161 oxt. 140 

and loavo a message. 

Wo will got back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

fax our 24-hour fax lino at 

(847) 2232691. 

LINCOLN 1993 TOWN 
CAR, Signature, 74K miles. 
Asking $6,500. (647) 
623-4956 after 5:30pm. 

MASERATI 1986 Bl- 
TURBO CONVERTIBLE, 
with leather interior, 56K. ex- 
coiionj maintained, all records, 
garaged. $9,500. (414) 
245-6881, 

MASERATI 1986 Bl- 
TURBO CONVERTIBLE, with 
leather intorir, 56K, 

MAZDA 1997 MIATA, 
$13,595. CALL FRANK (847) 
616-6660. 

MAZDA MX6 1993, $4,995. 
CALL FRANK (847) 816-6660. 



MERCURY 1990 TOPAZ, 

high milos, runs good, 
$700/bost, (4(4) 551-8801. 

MERCURY 6TH AVE., 

1988, looks/runs excellent 
Asking 52.300/bost. Must see. 
(847) 395-4733. 

MIRAGE 1999, $11,995. 
CALL FRANK (647) 8166660. 



MITSUBISHI 
3000GT, $35,995, 
(847)8166660 



1905 
call frank 



MITSUBISHI 1996 GAL- 
ANT, $11,995. CALL FRANK 
(847)816-6660. _^ 

MITSUBISHI 1996 GAL- 
ANT, $10,595. CALL FRANK 
(847)816 6660, 

MITSUBISHI 1999 

ECLIPSE, $14,995. CALL 
FRANK (847) 616-6660. 

NISSAN 1996 ALTIMA, 
$11,595. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

OLDS 1994 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME SL. $6,995. CALL ED 
(847) 6258400. 

PONTIAC 1995 BONNE- 
VILLE, $11,995. CALL 
FRANK (647) 818-6660. 

PONTIAC 1996 BONNE- 
VILLE SE, white. (815) 
675-2776. 

PONTIAC 1996 SUNFIRE 

SL, 150hp convertible, 12 disc 
CD changer, power windows 
and locks. Many extras. Must 
soe. Blue Book $13,700, ask- 
ing $11,500. 6518 23rd. Ave. 
Konosha, (414) 657-1163. 
(414)818-1890. 

PORSCHE 944 1936, ex- 
cellent runner, clean, needs 
minor repairs, $7,500/bost. 
(847) 740-6039 aftor 5pm or 
anytime weekends. 

SAAB '90 9000 Turbo, Sun- 
roof, garage kept. Leather. 
Ono owner. Excollont condi- 
tion. SS.OOO/best. (847) 
295-6241 



SAAB 9000 1907, $3,995. 
CALL FRANK (847) 816-6660. 

AUTO AUCTION 

SALVATION ARMY 

Saturday, Oct. 2nd. 

9am. 

Over ioo to bo sold to the 

highest bidder. 

No retarve. 

On 176 In Ubertyvllle 

Eatt of 1-94 & Lambs 

Firm. 

(847) 660-1955. 

SATURN SL1 1094, 
$5,495. CALL FRANK (647) 
616-6660. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKE- 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNET! Visit 
http:f7www.lpnows.CQm/ to 
placo your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, in 
all Lakeland Papers, The ' 
Groat Lakes Bulletin and Tho 
Markot Journal for only $10,75 
for 15 words, then 15c each 
additional word. 

TAURUS WAGON 1993, 

clean, full power, high miles, 
asking $2,750/bo9t. (815) 
344-1418. 

TOYOTA 1987 SUPRA, 
brown, very dean, 103K miles, 
A/C, loaded, original owner, 
$3.400/bost. (847) 599-0345. 

TOYOTA 1988 CAMRY, 
$3,995. CALL ED (647) 625- 
6400. 

TOYOTA 1991 TERCEL, 
$3,995. CALL EO (647) 625- 
8400. 

TOYOTA 1M5 CAMRY^ LE, 

$9,995. CALL EO (847} 625- 
8400. 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page 4 



i 




2BE2SI^'?2S 



Volvo 



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Per Mo. 
39 Mos. 



$2500 Down Plus Tax, Title, 
License, 12K Mile Package 



MSRP $40,025 
Or Buy For 

4.9% APR 

FOR 48 MONTHS 




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FIELDS Infiniti 

.21 S. Milwaukee Ave. • Libertyville • 847.362.9200 



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visit us on the web at: www.fielcisauto.com 





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October 8, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



i 



Lakeland Newspapers / P3 



FROM PAGE Dl 

VENTURE: Expands its lineup for 2000 



Nick Graham's Joe Boxer collection is a 
great fit. It's fun, functional and includes 
everything from slecpwcar to now even a 
home collection In whimsical prints for the 
entire family. Nick Graham, like Chevy 
Venture, believes in Innovation and devel- 
oping new product ideas. 

New Venture radios have a redesigned 
faceplate with unique buttons, graphics and 
colors. Uplcvcl Venture model radios fea- 
ture new Radio Data System (RDS) tcch- 
, nology as standard. RDS permits traffic 
and weather bulletins to interrupt radio, 
cassette and compact disc programming so 
important information can be heard. 

The new Ven' :c Value Van comes 
pre-packaged with a long list of standard • 
features at significant cost-savings. Key 
features include: seven-passenger bench 
seating, integrated rear-scat ducts, air con- 
ditioning, a Tllt-Whccl™ steering column 
an AM/FM stereo. 

New Smokcy Carmel Metallic paint 
brings Venture exterior color choices (de- 
pending on model) to nine. 

Venture continues to offer valuable 
safety features, such as driver and front- 
passenger air bags and side-impact air bags 
for the driver and front-passenger. Also in- 
cluded arc child security rear door locks, 
available child safety seats. Daytime Run- 
ning Lamps (DRL) with Automatic Exterior 
Lamp Control and standard 4-whecI an- 
tilock brakes (ABS) for added driver control 



during hard braking. 

A variety of available seating configura- 
tions can adapt to an owner's individual . 
needs, offering up to 200 different configu- 
rations. Depending on model, seating 
ranges from second- and third-row bench 
seats to light-weight modular bucket seats 
at all rear positions. 

"Venture is a true family van because 
of its versatility and seating flexibility that 
can be altered to varying numbers of pas- 
sengers or to accommodate cargo," says 
Venture Brand Manager Dan Keller. "When 
you combine those qualities with its reliabil- 
ity, comfort and safety features, you've got 
an outstanding minivan." 

Commercial van buyers will appreciate 
the Venture Cargo Minivan. This hard- 
working Extended Wheclbase (120-inch) 
model includes such standard features as front air 
conditioning and driver and front-passenger high- 
back bucket scats. The cargo area is protected 
from wear and tear by a full- length rubber floor 
mat, while a particle and odor fiher help keep the 
interior fresh. 

Clearly, Chevy Venture is a flexible, 
hard-working minivan that offers what to- 
day's active families need, from the day-to- 
day commute to long-distance traveling. 
With a choice of wheelbases, interior con- 
figurations and trim levels, as well as pas- 
senger or cargo models, Venture remains a 
leader in the highly competitive minivan 
market. 



How to save your car from 
harsh winter weather 



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Selling Your Car? 

Let Lakeland's Auto Marketplace help you! 

Call (847) 223-8161 for more information! 



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Rain, mud, snow and salt are all tough on 
drivers. But have you ever thought how tough 
these elements arc on your car? 

To prepare for winter, I always check my 
tires, the antifreeze and the windshield 
wipers," explains Mark Warren, a resident of 
Chicago. "As far as the appearance of my car, I 
usually buy rubber floor mats to protect the 
carpet, I never stop to think about how weather 
and road salt will affect the finish of my car." 

Most drivers don't think about washing 
their car during the winter months. Some even 
think that washing their car in winter will dam- 
age their vehicle, 

"Washing your car In the winter months 
can be one of the most beneficial things you 
can do to maintain the value of your car," ex- 
plains Mark Thorsby, executive director of the 
International Carwash Association, a not-for- 
profit trade association committed to educat- 
ing the motoring public on vehicle mainte- 
nance. 

"If left on your car, mud, salt, rain and 
snow can damage your car's clear finish. Mud 
and salt caked on the undercarriage can even 
help promote rust • especially in order vehicles 
- and can also afTect how well your car drives," 
said Thorsby. The car is the first or second 
greatest asset for the average family. Keeping 
your vehicle clean by frequenting a profession- 
al carwash is one of the best defenses in pro- 
tecting a car's finish and the family's invest- 
ment" 

According to studies compiled by the asso- 
ciation, one of the most critical times to wash 
your car is immediately after a rainfall. As rain 
falls, it collects pollutants from the air, a con- 
cept commonly referred to as "acid rain." Even 
after a light rainfall, rainwater and pollutants 
fall on your car. The water eventually evapo- 
rates, leaving a thin film of pollutants that can 
damage your car's finish. 

The longer you leave these pollutants on 
your car, the more damage they will inflict on 
your car's finish," said Thorsby. "Washingyout 
vehicle immediately after a rainfall helps pre- . 



vent damage." 

Snow and sleet can also result in the same 
damaging effects as acid rain and are often 
compounded by chemicals in road salt. To pre- 
vent winter damage, the ICA recommends 
washing your vehicle every 10 days. 

"We recommend washing your car in a 
professional car wash rather than your drive- 
way," said Thorsby. "Professional car washes 
are gender on auto finishes than a bucket and 
hose, and they use cleaning solutions specially 
formulated for today's more complex car fin- 
ishes." 

As an added bonus, ICA claims that profes- 
sional car washes use biodegradable cleaning 
solutions, far less water than driveway washes 
and dispose of waste water responsibly- not 
down the storm sewer where it can contami- 
nate lakes and streams. 

To minimize, even eliminate, damage to 
your car this winter, follow these simple tips: 
• At a full-service car wash, ask the attendant to, 
thoroughly dry around the inside of the door 
and trunk, as well as the joint where power an- 
tennas attach to the vehicle. At a self-service or 
exterior only car wash, bring a few towels with 
you so you can do this yourself. 

• Immediately after washing the vehicle, 
open and close all doors, the trunk and other 
parts of the car with locks several times before 
parking it (this will eliminate water freezing in 
locks in extreme cold). 

• Periodically apply a good silicone spray to 
all weather stripping during freezing weather. 

•Wash your car every 10 days and right af- 
ter a snow or rain shower. 

• Wax your car at least every six 
months. More frequent waxing is needed 
if your car is red, black or white, as these 
colors are more susceptible to acid rain 
and UV rays. 

Go to a professional car wash that is pro- 
fessionally managed, has clean facilities and 
uses we II- maintained equipment For the ad- 
dress of a professional car wash near you. visit 
http:/ / www.carvyashesxom./ 





2000 Mitsubishi 
Mirage DE 

4- Do or Stock #1971 

$13,785 



2000 Mitsubishi 
Galant ES 

Pwr. Windows, Pwr. Locks, Pwr. Mirrors. 
Stock 11974 

$17,267 



2000 Montero 
Sport 

In Stock And Ready To Sell 




Th 



North Shore's Lari 



st Seloctlen Of 



w And Pre- 



'94 DODGE SHADOW 

AUIO, A/C. AM/FM, Good Car 
Slock • 1452. Priced To Sell. 
$ 



'98 UIPGUNDCMIOftEIUUM 

4*4. ChjrcoJl/Oold, Power All. Slock 
f 18WJQ. Oet Ready For Winter. 

*1 8,595 



'87 SAAB 9000 

Cray, PW, PL Nice Car. 

*3995 



'94 FORD EXPLORER 

4»4. Green. AM/FM, Cassette, Auto. 
Slock 4671W». Only 56IC 

M. 3,595 



'96 MITSUIISHI MOKTItO 

LS, Ok. Oreen. Stock • 6710P. Priced 
Right For Winter. 

„ * 1 7,995 



'94 SATURN SLI 

Low, Low Miles. Nice Car For College. 
Onr/39K. 

$ 5495 



'99 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE 

I6K, AM/FM, Cassette, Auto, A/C. 



Stock 167 12P. 



rs 



14,995 



96 HONDA PASSPORT 

4x4, Black Beauty, Low Mile*. Musi 
See. Stock I670GP. 

r 1 7,595 



'96 TOYOTA AVALON 

4-Dr.. pw, PL, AM/FM, Cassette. Stock 
• I817A. 

• 14,995 



'98 MITSUIISHI MONTIIO 

4i4, 12K, Auto, Power All. Stock 
I6316P. Like Brand New. 



'95 MITSUBISHI 3000 GT 

Pearl White, Convertible, Hard Too, PW, PL, 
PM, AM/FM, CO. Stock IM34P. Only Xtt 

35,995 



'98 MITSUIISHI ICUPSE CSX 

Ail Wheel Orb*. Stock M724P. 
Sporty & Fun. 



* 18,995 



'96 MITSUBISHI GALANT 

Onry 24X.PW, PL, PU. Slock I1314A. , 
Low Miles. 4 



10,595 



'97 CHIVY MONTI CARLO 

Z-J4. Power All, Auto, A/C. Slock I IflOJA. 

51 ♦ 13,995 



'96 TOYOTA CAMRY LI 

4-Oc, PW, PU Auto, A/C, Tan, AM/FM, 
Cassette. Slock t«7t IP. 

25,995 ;. Ai 1,595 



'99 MITSUBISHI MOKTEtO SPORT 

LS, White. An The Options, Uke Brand New. 
$ 



Stock 46720P. 



'93 MAZDA MX6 

Oreen Coupe, PW, PL, Price N*e. 



4995 



'96 TOYOTA COROLLA 

4-Dr., Uke New, Auto, A/C, AM/FM, Power 
ajl Stock KS9CP. R ed & Ready. 

*!0,595 



'98 TOYOTA CAMRY 

4-Dr, Oreen, Low Mies, Auto, A/C. PW, PL, 
Stock I W99P. Price Right 

* 15,995 



'97 MAZDA MIATA 

Black Convertible, AM/FM, Caisette, PW, 
PL. Stock f66C2P. Only MK. 

9 



13,595 



i»d Mltiubl ' 
MITSUBISHI GALANT 



ES, 4-Or„ Green, PW. PU Stock 11470*- 



11,995 



'95 PONTIAC BONNIVIUI 

4-rx, Low, Low Miles, Silver, Power AIL 
Like New. 



11,995 



'96 NISSAN ALTIMA 

4-Or„ Tan, Leather, Sunroof. Stock tW95P. 
CMySK. 



.M 1,595 



'97 INFINIYI QX4 

4i4, BtacU Leather, Sunroof, 20K. Al The 
Toys! Only 



'34,995 



'99 MIRAGE 

4 To Choose. Priced To Set. Your Choke. 
Stock 4673 IP, I0T33P, M734P, 167 JSP 



* 11,995 



'98 FORD ESCORT 

4-Dr, Maroon, Auto, A/C, Power AL 
Stock 418MA. Uke Brand New 

$ 9995 



'95 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 

Aula, A/C Stock I »M2B. Priced To SeL 



$ 3995 



'96 JfPGUMORNB 

4-Oc, 4*4, White, Low Mees, 
Stock H7»P. %\ W W 



UUttDO 

AL 



'96 JVHlttCnOCHeUfK 

UO, 4*4, Black Beauty, Leather, Power AL 

-s^k ««» « 19,995 



■ ■• r>i,'i,M)>M 



A Mlnl«ur « Hontt/6,000 

Net Warranty AnilaU 

On AN Used Can 



Bob RfihrtHAH,'f 



(847)816-6660 



$•*)**"; 



2,600 



IT f I I I H I 



1119 S. Milwaukee Avenue 

# f volume Mitsubishi dealership on the North Shore! 



Sales Hours: 

Mon - Fri 9am - 9pm 
Saturday 9am - 6pm 



D4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Auto Marketplace Classifieds 



October 8, 1999 



fa 



TOYOTA 1996 AVALON, 
$14,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
616-6660. ' 

TOYOTA 1996 CAMRY LE, 
$10,595. CALL FRANK (047) 
8166660. 

TOYOTA 1996 COROLLA 
$10,595. CALL FRANK (047) 
816 6660. 

TOYOTA 199B CAMRY, 
$15,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

TRIUMPH SPITFIRE, 

LOOKS end runs good, ask- 
ing $2,500. (847) 623-9850. 




Classic/Antique Cars 



AMC 1974 MATADOR 
BROUGHAM, 2-door, air, 
cruise, BOK miles, stored in- 
side winters, trophy wlnnor. 
Asking $4,500. (414) 
694-6453. 

ANTIQUE 1948 WILLY'S 
STAKE BODY, 90% restored, 
asking $3,900. (847) 
395-2647. 

CHEVY 1972 CORVETTE, 
64,000 original miles, new 
rear spring, stainless stool 
brakes, $8,500/best. (847) 
356-5044. 

DELOREAN 1981, 5- 
SPEED, 1 -owner, 10K miles, 
new tiros, excellent condition, 
No winters. $19,500. Wilmot, 
Wisconsin (414) 877-9069. 

LINCOLN 1972 CONTI- 
NENTAL MACH 4, complete- 
ly restored, SB.500/bost. Exlra 
car for parts. (414) 763-9935, 
(414) 7637280. 




Vans 



ASTRO CONVERSTION 
VAN 1992, $8,995. CALL ED 
(B47) 6258400. . 

CHEVY 1994 ASTRO VAN, 
interior packago with captain 
chairs, power windows/locks, 
running boards, excellent con- 
dition, garage kept, $7,900. 
(414)843-4154. 

CHEVY 1997 ASTRO CON-' 
VERSION VAN, 32,900 milos, 
warranty, all the bolls and 
whistles, $15,900. (414) 
843-3175. 

DODGE 1996 CARAVAN 
SE, 48,000 milos, brand now 
tiros, 2 sliding doors, air, 
$13,000/best. (847) 
356-5044. 

FORD 1977 CUBE VAN, 
14ft., runs good, $1,500. 1986 
Plymouth Voyager, $550. Also 
other cars (or sale. (414) 
B62-9862. 

PLYMOUTH 1990 GRAND 
VOYAGER LE in oxcollent con- 
dition, Asking $6,000. Call 
(847) 526-5755 days, (847) 
526-6306 evonlngs. 



ISUZU RODEO 1994, great 
shape, 57K, $12,000/best. 
(815)675-1833. 

JEEP 1980 CHEROKEE 5- 
speed, 15,000 milos on now 
2.8 motor, now brakes, discs, 
bearings, muffler, works good, 
$3,800/bosl, Ramon Acuna 
8am-7pm. (847) 249 0136. 

JEEP 1990 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LTD, $19,995. CALL 
FRANK (847) 8166660, 

JEEP 1996 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LAREDO, $17,995. 
CALL FRANK (847) 816 6660. 

JEEP 1997 CHEROKEE 
SPORT, white/gray, Soloc- 
Trac 4x4, air, full powor, 
clean, like now, $14,900. 
(414) 694-6562 ovonlngs. 

MITSUBISHI 1996 MON- 
TERO, $17,995, CALL 
FRANK (847) 8166660. 

MITSUBISHI 1998 MON- 
TERO, $25,995. CALL 
FRANK (847) 816-6660 

MITSUBISHI 1999 MON- 
TERO SPORT. $22,995. 
CALL FRAK (647) 816-6660, 




Four Wheel Drive 
jeeps 



M 


Service & Parts 



FOUR 17x9 CHROME 

COBRA R-STYLE RIMS 

AND TIRES. 

BRAND NEW. 

$1,400/BEST. 

Colt (847) 548-6140 

Ask for Soan or loavo 

message. 



FORD 1992 F-150 Short- 
box 4WD. black, XLT, full pow- 
er, 351 V8. automatic. Ton- 
noau cover, excellent condi- 
tion. $9,000. (847) 545-6131 
leave message. 

FORD 1994 EXPLORER, 
S 13,595. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

GREAT DEAL! MUST SELL 
MOVING! 1995 Chevy Tahoo, 
black, 2-door sport, off road 
package, fully loaded, Norf 
bars included, $16,350/best. 
Call anytime, it not In leavo 
message, will call back ASAP 

(847) 9B9-3334 

HONDA 1996 PASSPORT, 
$17,595. CALL FRANK (847) 
616-6660. 



Trucks/Trailers 



FORD 1990 F-150 XLT, 

nice condition, I -owner, 
$2,800. Ron (847) 526-3290. 

CHEVROLET 1992 SIL- 
VERADO, full siio pickup, 
with 3-toolboxes, 87,000 
milos. oxcollent condition, 
Good work truck. $8,500. 
(414)694-9671. ' 

CHEVY 1987 3/4 TON 2WD 
350, unbelievable buy, au- 
tomatic, excellent condition. 
$4,500 with cap and rack, 
(B47) 662-5202. 

CHEVY 1993 1-TON, dual 
whool, extondod cab, Silvera- 
do Packago, 6.5 turbo diosei, 
4, speed automatic, 410, dual 
tanks, $14,000/bost. (847) 
263-7320. 




BM*K 
RATES 




© -WAUKEGAN- * 

" Over 500 z 

new and late model 

cars, trucks and 

4x4s available! 



NEED4C4JU 

momonet 

°*CteD/Tjs 



2000 MVP LX »fl"99 MAZDA B-2500 



LX Security Package, dual 
air, 4 seasons package, full 
power, auto trans. 



A/C, BEDUNER, FULLY EQUIPPED 
& MUCH MORE 





§21 1975* as low as $9995 



All INCENINES MPtlf.0. 'ftUlMUiUUlCCNSE 1 DOC f K.»U INCENTIVES WPUEO. COUtCl CUDOATt MATE. VWH AMOVED CltDIT. Off £1 CXfim Mill. 







S (847)662-2400 



AZDA 

100 GREEN BAY RD. 

WAUKEGAN 



41 






■J 



Grand Ave. 



ROSEN 
MAZDA 



Wutwtgtnn 



DODGE 1SB0 
RAMCHARGER 31 8 eld au- 
tomatic, 4x4, A/C, powor wind- 
ows/door locks, tilt, crulso, 
78,000 milos, oxcollonl corsdi- 
tlpn. (815) 759-1220. 

DODGE 1997 DAKOTA, ox- 
collonl condition, Club Cob, 
loaded, 50,000 milos, 
$13,500. Days (630) 514- 
8631, ovonlngs (815) 
33B-9249. 

FORD 1S60 PICKUP 
TRUCK with cap, rally rims, 
now front ond, plus AoroCratt 
boat, $1,000/bost. (815) 
363-6956. 

FORD 1987 TRUCK F-350, 
cab and chassis, 6.9 diosol, 
now tenders and doors, 
S4.000/DO5I. (414) 877-9644. 

FORD 1998 RANGER, 
SHARP, 30,000 miles, A/C, 
bodllnor, extended warranty, 
now $15K, sacrifice $9,999. 
(847) 812-8443 loavo mes- 
sago. 

NISSAN 1994 PICK-UP, 
$7,995. CALL ED (847) 625- 
6400. 

TRAILER 30' FLATBED, 
tri-axlo, oloctrlc brakos, 
$695/bost. (414) 308-4814. 




Motorcycles 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 1989 
HERITAGE SOFTAIL. 
OOcu.ln., ported and polished 
hoods, porformanco cam, 
S&S carburetor, oxtromoly do- 
tailed custom point and 
chromo work. To soo this 
show Harloy, Call Gill at (414) 
694-7947. Asking $27,000. 
Sortous Inqulrloa only. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON RED 
1984 FLHTC, completely ro- 
bciill In 1997, oxcollent condi- 
tion, $9,000/bost, (815) 
344-4273. 

KD FXR REPUCA 1998. 
custom built from ground up. 
S&S Ness. Must soil, $22,000. 
(414) B70-31B2 call after- 
noons, 

HONDA 1983 CX850 Cus- 
tom, UK, now rear tire, runs 
good, must see, $1,150/bost. 
(414) 654-6885. 

MOTORCYCLE 1998 

ZX9R, low milos, oxcollent 
condition, now tiros, green 
windshield. Must soil. 
$8,2O0/bO3t. (815) 38S-5736. 

SUZUKI 1998 GSXR750, 

bought now 7/99, less than 
450 milos, $7,600/bost. (847) 
244-0487. 




Recreational 
Vehicles 



1975 H.D. XLH SPOHT- 
STER. good condition, $3,750. 
(B47) 546-9367 Bob. 

1994 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
ULTRA CLASSIC, lots extras. 
39.000 milos, must soo/scll. 
(414) 767-0671 aftor 5pm. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1970 
FLH ELECTRAGL1DE S&S 

Carb, shovel, extras, clean, 
S7.500/OQO. Call ovonlngs 
(414)694-7715. 



1978 WINNEBAGO 

BRAVE 23ft., wator. electric, 
generator. Dodgo 360 engine, 
runs good, needs minor re- 
pairs, $4,300/00*1. (847) 927- 
0441,(847)526-0391. 

1982 24FT. KAYOT PON- 
TOON BOAT, tncludos chairs 
and O/B motor, $4,500. (B47) 
395-6637. 

1986 JAYCO POP-UP 

CAMPER, designer aortas, 
sleeps 6. lurnaco, fridge, biko 
rock, and potty, $1,8O07bost. 
(847) 223-6234. 



1990 COACHMAN CAMP* 
ER 30ft., oxcollonl condition, 
very clean, stoops 6, separate 
bodrom, awning, $7,000. 
(847) 223-0022. 

1995 WINNEBAGO 34FT. 
slide-out, jacks, loaded, under 
1GK, oxcollent condition, 
$49,900. (847) 599-7430 
days, (847) 748-3237 ovon- 
lngs, (847) 872-0752 6pm- 
9pm. 

1997 30FT. YELLOW- 
STONE CAPRI 6TH 
WHEEL TRAVEL TRAIL- 

ER, with s lido out. All weather 
unit. Includes oak cabtnots, 
washer/dryer, smooth/ fiber- 
glass skin and more. 
$22,S00VbOSt. (847) 778-0228. 

1999 14FT. FLAGSTAFF 
CRANK-UP CAMPER FOR 
SALE. Has A/C, Used only 
onco, $7,500.. Please call 
(715)963-2900, / 

1999 JAMBOREE MOTOR 
HOME 24ft.. 24K, $24,000. 
(847)439-0568/ 

COACHMAN 1993 CATA- 
UNA, 27ft., fully equipped, 
5th wheel, microwave, stove, 
rofrigerator, sleeps 6, central 
air and heat with awning, im- 
maculate condition, must sen, 
$B.450/oost. (647) 543-0660. 

DODGE TRANS VAN MO- 
TORHOME, 1961 V8, prc- 
pano and electric, port-a-pot- 
ty, low miloago, runs groat, 
stove, refrigerator. (414) 
677-9479 after 5pm. 



For More 
Classifieds, 
See Page 7 







D5 / Lakeland Newsp apers 

Safety tips to keep the baby 
safe and sound while driving 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



October 8. 1999 



There is nothing quite like the excite- 
ment of having a new baby in the family. 
There also is nothing that changes a par- 
ent's lire more dramatically— from daily 
routines to the kinds of products that are 
necessary to keep the baby safe and com- 
fortable. 

One product that every parent who 
drives must have is a child car scat All 50 
states require the use of a child car scat. 
And, all car scats manufactured today 
must be designed to meet a safety stan- 
dard set by the federal government in 
1981. 

Are you using your child's car scat cor- 
rectly? The Juvenile Products Manufactur- 
ers Association ( JPMA) encourages par- 
ents and caregivers to ask themselves this 
question to aid in the proper installation 
of car seats. An alarming number of car 
seats are installed incorrectly and some 
parents unknowingly may put their child 
at risk. 

When selecting a child car seat, "Par- 
ents always should follow both the car 
scat and the vehicle instructions," says 
Kathleen M. Baier, JPMA vice president of 
communications. "We want parents to 
help ensure their baby's safety by buck- 
ling up baby correctly and securely every 
time." 

To help stress the importance of in- 
stalling a car seat correctly,. the associa- 
tion encourages parents and other care- 
givers to take time, each time, to consider 
the following items. 

Check the Seat 

• The back seat is the safest place for a 
car seal. 

• Never place a rear-facing car seat in 
a position with an active air bag. 

• Secure the car seat tightly, allowing 
as little movement as possible at the base 
of the car seat. 




Keep the baby safe while driving with a 
properly installed child car seat. 

Check the Child 

•The harness straps must go over the 
child's shoulders and lie flat against the 
child's chest. 

•The harness clip should lie flat at 
armpit level. 

• Allow no more than one finger to fit 
between the harness strap and the child's 
shoulders. 

Check the age/weight guidelines 

• Up to 1 year and 20 pounds: Use a 
rear-facing seat. 

• At least I year and up to 30 to 40 
pounds: Use a forward-facing seat. 

• More than 30 to 40 pounds: Use a 
booster seat. 

Because nothing is more important to 
a parent than keeping his or her child 
safe, JPMA takes many steps to educate 
parents about the safe use and selection 
of juvenile products. For more tips or to 
sec the JPMA Safety House, filled with 
critical safety information, visit the Web 
site at www.jpma.org. 



Towing doesn't have to be a drag 



Common sense tells us that taking care of 
our automobile keeps it running well. It also 
makes sense that today's hardest working ve- 
hicles - SUVs, trucks and other 4x4s subject to 
extreme operating conditions like towing and 
off-roading- need extra protection. These 
powerful engines work harder, but only if you 
treat them right. 

The most important element in maintain- 
ing your engine is motor oil. For example, did 
you know that your oil provides approximate- 
ly 40 percent of the engine's cooling require- 
ments? Changing your oil every 3,000 to 5,000 
miles helps, but there are better ways to pro- 
tect your engine. 

Adding RUIone Upgrade to your motor 
oil, for example, creates a synthetic blend lu- 
bricant that really pulls its weight. Indepen- 
dent laboratory tests confirm that Upgrade 
substantially reduces friction, improves ther- 
mal stability and increases the load carrying 
capabilities of regular motor oil. Best of all. 
you can add a 15 oz. bottle of Upgrade at any- 



time - a real benefit for vehicles towing boats, 
trailers and campers. 

Upgrade is just one way to care for your 
engine. If you suspect (hat deposits in the 
crankcase have robbed engine power, a prod- 
uct such as Rislone EngineTreatment can re- 
store efficiency. It penetrates piston rings and 
bearing surfaces to remove sludge and var- 
nish, quiets noisy valves and lifters, and then 
goes on to promote a clean, smoother-run- 
ning engine. To reduce oil burning and ex- 
haust smoke while quieting noisy engines and 
cushioning worn parts, try Rislone Ring Seal. 
Its high-shear polymers increase oil viscosity 
to seal worn pistons and rings, so you can re- 
gain lost compression. 

Towing doesn't have to be a drag, and test 
results prove it. To learn how your can 
help your SUV, truck or car engine tow 
long and prosper, ask for a free copy of 
our informative booklet. Mow to Treat 
Your Engine Right. Just call 800-622-1 170 
or Visit www.Rislone.com. 



Why Don't You ... 



Whether you drive down the road or across the country, there are certain items that 
should be kept In your car in case of an emergency — especially during the cold-weather . 
months. Why not take a moment to check that you have the following items in your can 
you never know when they'll come in handy. 

•Warm blankets 

• Spare tire' 

• Car jack 

• Road flares 
•Pack of matches 

• Map of the United States, plus amap featuring the streets in your neighborhood 

• Package of bandages 

• Flashlight with extra batteries 

• Shovel 

• Ice scraper 

• Extra set of waterproof gloves 

• Roll of paper towels arid glass cleaner to clean dirty windshields 
■ Umbrella 

• Pens, pencils and notepaper ■ 
•Extra change for unexpected tolls 






•k ~k "& ~k ~k F/veStaw. It*b Better. We'll Prove It! 7*r 

Chrysler # Plymouth © Jeep & Dodge || Hyundai 





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'96 GMC Sierra 1500 



'96 Dodge Dakota 



*96 Chevrout Camaro RS 
25£2L*flfl,S@® 



•96 Eagle Talon TSi 



2000 Plymouth Neon 

ssr.^. •«&©©© 



'96 Dodge Gr, Caravan 



*94 Jeep Cr, Cherokee LTD 



*97 Pontiac Montana Transport 

ES^a©,©©® 



'90 Dodge Spirit 

%£££ •as®®- 



'91 Chevy Camaro 

loaded. Tiopj 

(MNO) — 



a®,©©® 



'94 Dodge Caravan SE 

AtWhed Drr*' 

(HIH) 



s<&,©©® 



*95 Plymouth Neon 

4Jkm.tel.4dr 
(.41 M) 



«^©@® 



'93 Dodge Caravan 

7 JX7?L- e<&©©® 



'89 Dodge Ram Maw Van 

people amer 



$ <a,©s® 



92 Chevroiet Blazer 

badtd *«h l»jry 
MUD 



'97 Jeep Wrangler 



4.4. 4dr 

(•1IU J- 



'95 Gr. Cherokee Laredo 

SiSL- *fl§} 9 ©©® 



'98 Dodge Avenger ES 



•98 Dodge Gr, Caravan 

*l^_$fl^©©® 



'94 Toyota 4-Runner 

loaded, 4*4 



IMJIOJ.. 



^0© 9 ©©@ 



'91 Nissan Sentra 



'90 Mazda 626 

auto vim. A/C 



*fl 8 ©©® 



♦85 Jaguar XJ6 

2!£~L *a©@® 



'87 BMW 325i 

z£^r *a©©@ 



'92 Mitsubishi Gallant 

4dr.Wkrmtei 

(ail.*) 



^S 8 ©©® 



*90 Lmcoln Continental 

only 70k mJei as=> r^\r=^^-v 



'98 Hyundai Elantra 

tzz?? *© a ©©® 



'99 Hyundai Accent GL 



'99 Hyundai Sonata GL 

££- aflfl,©©® 



'94 Mazda Navajo 

ooty 6Annln 

|MW| 



•tia ft 2©® 



'93 Mitsubishi Montero 

_ *fl§) a ©©® 



•4IWI- 



<93 Volvo 850 GLT 




Route4I & Clayey Rd Exit (847)831 



'• 



October 8, 1999 AUTO MARKETPLACE Lakeland Newspapers / D6 

Quiz 'Opens Eyes' to the 
dangers of sleepy driving 



Sleeping and driving don't mix. When you 
are behind the wheel of a car, being sleepy Is 
dangerous. Sleepiness slows reaction time, 
decreases awareness and impairs judgement, 
just like drugs or alcohol. And, just like drugs 
and alcohol, sleepiness can contribute to a 
collision. 

I low safe a sleeper arc you? Find out by 
taking the following quiz, courtesy of the AAA 
Foundation for Traffic Safety, 

True or False? 
T F 

| 1 1. Coffee overcomes the effects of drowsi- 
ness while driving. 

] 2. 1 can tell when I'm goin^ to go to sleep. 
~^} 3. I'm a safe driver, so it doesn't matter if 
Fin sleepy. 

1 «T. 1 get plenty of sleep. 

' j 5. Young people need less sleep. 

Answers 

I. False — Stimulants are no substitute for 
sleep. Products containing caffeine can make 
you more alert, especially when used in con- 
junction with naps. However, when they are 
used alone, the effects Inst only for a short 
lime. If you drink coffee and seriously are 



sleep- deprived, you still are likely to have "mi- 
cro-sleeps" - brief naps that last four or five 
seconds. At 55 mph, that's more than 100 
yards. 

2. False — If you're like most people, you 
believe you can control your sleep. The truth 
is, sleep is not voluntary. If you're drowsy, you 
can fall asleep and never even know it. You 
also cannot tell how long you've been asleep. 
When you're driving, being asleep even for a 
few seconds can be fatal. 

3. False— The only safe driver is an alert 
driver. Even the safest drivers become con- 
fused and use poor judgement when they are 
sleepy. 

4. False — Chances are good that you real- 
ly aren't getting all the sleep you need. The av- 
erage person needs seven or eight hours of 
sleep a night. 

5. Palsc — In Fact; teen-agers and 
young adults need more sleep than peo- 
ple in their 30s. They often get less, be- 
cause they enjoy slaying up late. Teen- 
agers and young adults who get up early 
tend to feel alert in the evening. They 
think that means they don't need much , 
sleep. The problem is, the temporary 
alertness wears off later, and they can end 
up driving home drowsy. 



StoD car thieves in their tracks 



wit 



i effective anti-theft devices 



Professional car thieves can steal any car, 
however, you can help thwart thieves from 
stealing yours by using an anti-theft device. 
According to the National Insurance Crime 
Bureau (NIGB), all vehicle theft-prevention 
equipment helps deter criminals, and many 
anti-theft devices also are effective in protect- 
ing your vehicle from burglaries and vandal- 
ism. 

To help protect your car, following is a list 
of ant) -theft devices; courtesy of wvvw.ln- 
sweh.com. 

• Car alarm — The typical car alarm is 
equipped with motion sensors and a loud 
siren oi series of tones in (lie 1 20- decibel 
range. The best car alarms automatically 
arm themselves when you leave the vehi- 
cle and Include an automatic kill switch. 
The best models also flash the headlights 
and honk (he horn in addition to sounding a 
siren. 

• Electronic tracking device — This device 
uses an electronic transmitter hidden in the 



vehicle which emits a signal that is picked up 
by the police or a monitoring station. 

• Kill switch — Effective and inexpensive 
to install, a kill switch is a hidden switch that 
prevents the flow of electricity or fuel to the 
engine until it is activated. Starter disablers 
also are growing in popularity, 

• Steering-wheel lock — A long metal bar 
with a lock that fits on the steering wheel, a 
steering-wheel lock is designed to prevent the 
steering wheel from being turned; It nlao nets 
as a visual deterrent for thieves [leering into 
car windows. 

•Theft-deterrent decal — A typical decal 
identifies that the vehicle is protected by ei- 
ther an alarm system or a national theft-pre- 
vention company — an inexpensive way to 
bluff a car thief. 

• Tire lock — Similar to the circular steel 
"boots" used by many larger city police de- 
partments, a tire lock makes the car nearly im- 
possible to move. The locks also arc effective 
in deterring would-be thieves. 




On the Road Again ... 

It was back in 1947 when the first Zippo car, a "productmobile" created by George 
Blaisdell, made its debut appearance cruising the streets. Designed to look like the 
product it advertised, the car became a source of inspiration, leading the way at pa- 
rades and special events. In the late 1950s, however, the car was taken to a deal- 
er to be refurbished and mysteriously disappeared. While the fate of the original 
Zippo car remains a fascinating riddle to this day, a new Zippo car, built by Joe Grif- 
fin (Memphis, Tenn.), was reignlted in 1 997. The new car stretches 1 7 feet 1 1 1nch- 
es long by 6 feet 2 inches wide, and carries twin removable lighters with manual 
spring-assisted lids. The height of the car with the lighters closed Is 8 feet; 1 2 feet 
with the lighters open. Lighting the smiles of many a young (and older) child, the 
new Zippo car continues to drive home a classic message of style and quality. 




PRE-DRIVEN VEHICLE SELL-OFF 

. . .... ^ — .. .,..•.-.. .... - .. j-.ex.-.K . r , 

1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee 1996 Jeep Cherokee Sport 

Laredo low ^ r - 

b_ Miles! jSk? ., V - 



rorrtf 



Special W m mffW*m*& Special ItjIUU 

97 Grand Cherokee Limited...$22,900 94 Grand Cherokee Laredo....$1 1 ,900 

98 Grand Cherokee Laredo....$21 ,500 93 Grand Cherokee Laredo....$1 0,500 

97 Grand Cherokee Laredo....$20,500 94 Grand Cherokee Laredo $9,900 

97 Grand Cherokee Laredo.... $19,900 95 Jeep Wrangler 4X4 



/ll IH lit"" 



95 Grand Cherokee Ltd V-8....$1 7,900 95 Chevy Corsica 



IIIHH.llll.llllll.il 



llttll lllti.lllll lllllllll 



95 Grand Cherokee Laredo,...$1 5,500. 93 Mitsubishi Eclipse 



1IIIIIIIIIMIII 



Early Bird Pre-winter 

-^ii— — — — — — 

1 ij/t 




V-. 



Financing 
Available 







Vitelline Plows far All ffises 
Jeep • Chevy • Foi 
Dodge *GMC1 




fid C^ 1521 Belvidere St.(Rt. 120) 

^ErSzH^ Waukegan 

EEI 




HOURS: M-F 8a-7p & Sat 8a-5p 



On Your Way to the Lake Michigan Waterfront 



(847)623-1492 

'Aid sates add tax. Ulla. license and $40 doc tee. Hlusualiona approximate. 



'{ ifffll ,IM' 



ill PELFS ♦ II 



September 24, J 999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers / D7 



A bottle remedy to 
rid the winter blues 






The winter blues: A seasonal phase many 
of us experience, characterized by a decreased 
desire to be active and a willingness to just 
"stay put." The only relief seems to come from 
the warm sun of spring. 

lust like their human counterparts, a car's 
engine can lose some of the performance 
edge it once enjoyed. This may come in the 
form of hesitation ora feeling of power loss. 
While there are a number of possible causes, 
the problem may reside in the vehicle's fuel 
delivery system. With the winter season fast 
approaching, it's good common sense to get 
your fuel system revved up for the cold. 

In a modern fuel- injected engine, fuel is 
atomized and sprayed into the intake mani- 
fold by a scries of nozzles called "injectors." 
I : uel then is mixed with air in an area known 
as the combustion chamber. If left 
unchecked, these parts can become fouled 
with deposits and varnish, which can restrict 
(he fuel supply and translate into poor fuel 
economy and sluggish performance. 

The good news is that it's easy to help 
clean a vehicle's fuel system and restore its 



normal operating condition by adding a fuel- 
system treatment like STP® Complete Fuel 
System Cleaner. When added to a tank of fuel, 
the product works to clean deposits that can 
cause engine knock and ping, lost horsepow- 
er, hard starts, poor fuel economy, and in- 
creased emissions. 

"Cleaning a vehicle's dirty fuel Is as easy as 
pumping your own gas," says Paul Lincoln, 
STP product manager. "In fact, do-it-your- 
selfers can easily help clean the fuel delivery 
system, while at the same time restore lost 
performance. Adding a bottle of STP® Com- 
plete Fuel System Cleaner directly to a full 
tank of fuel at the first sign of problems helps 
clear away power- robbing deposits. Again, it's 
as easy as pumping your own gas." 

The experts at STP recommend adding a 
full IB-ounce bottle to the fuel system to help 
eliminate knock and ping, engine run-on and 
restore lost performance. The cleaner is safe 
for use with all gasolines, including oxygenat- 
ed and reformulated fuels. The product will 
not harm fuel system components, oxygen 
sensors or catalytic converters. 




It's easy to help clean a vehicle's fuel 
system and restore its normal operating 
condition by adding a fuel-system treat- 
ment like STP® Complete Fuel System 
Cleaner. When added to a tank of fuel, 
the product works to clean deposits that 
can cause engine knock and ping, lost 
horsepower, hard starts, poor fuel econ- 
omy, and increased emissions. 



Auto Marketplace Classifieds 






LAVTOM 1M3 TRAVEL 

TRAILER 26ft., front bedroom, 
roar bunk, stoops 8, full bath, 
awning, A/C, hitch Indudod, 
Sa,900. (647) 24»-0168. 

MOTORHOME 1995 

PACE Arrow, 33fl.. Chev 454, 

under ZOK mites, fully loadod, 
sloops 4, Includes car caddy 
and hitch, $84,500. (847) 
623-4674. 

SOUTHWfND 10B5, 27FT. 
Class A MH, fully sell-con- 
lainod. very clean, 
511,800/bost. (847) 
662-3637. 

UNION GROVE 1072 RoBo- 
home 14x70 with a 12x16 ad- 
dition, 3- bedrooms, covered 
deck, 2 sheds, Includes ap- 
pliances. Asking S27,0007bes1. 
(414)676-2726. 




Sria»TT»oNles/ATVi 



TWO SKI 000 SNOWMO- 
BILE ENGINES (1) Rebuilt 440 
(1 -season), 440 liquid cooled- 
ROTEX complele with twtn 
carboraiors, twin exhaust and 
dutch, SSOO/bett. (1) 1992 
617 liquid cooled ROTEX. 
complele with twin carbora- 
iors, exhaust manilotd and 
clutch. Si.OQOrtest. Call (647) 
922-3371. 

TWO SKIOOO SNOWMO- 
BILES (1) 1999 SKI-DO 
FORMULA SS, 670 liquid 
cooled hand/thumb warmers, 
USI skis and auxiliary power 
|ack, complete with cover, 
under 1.000 miles. Best otter 
over $5,000. (1) 1996 SKI 
000 FORMULA S fan 
cooled handyihumb warmers 
with cover. Best offer 52.500. 
Ideal beginner sled. Both- Best 
offer over $7,000. (847) 922- 

3371. 




Airphne 



1046 LUSCHOMBE BA, 
65hp, with fabric wings, wood 
prop and skis. Recent paint 
and glass. Looks and flies 
great. $16,500. (414) 
246-6702. 




Boat/MoiorVttc 



16' ALUMA CRAFT, 40hp 
Merc, depth finder, & extra 
stuff, $3,900. 1985 Chevy 
pickup, box, body, for parts. 
(414)279-6641 

16FT. SPARTAN, 25HP 

Evinrude, trailer, trolling mo- 
tor, 2-fish hnders, and many 
extras. $3,000. (647) 
265-2066. 

16FT. RANGER 166V 
150HP Evinrude, many extras, 
$5.600. (615) 675-2654. 

1972 AMF SUCKCRAFT 
93ft. cuddy, head. vhf. OMC 
ifl>. cover, In water, $4,000. 
(847)616-1250. 

1068 27FT. SEA RAY 266 
SUNOANCER 7.4L (454cu). 
V8 engine, blue/cream with 
teak Interior, sleeps 6, v- 
berth, eft cabin, dinette, sink. 
2-bumer stove, refrigerator, 

20 gallon fresh water ♦ 10 gal- 
lon hot water, full canvas and 
camper lop. Many extras. Very 
dean, only 400hrs. $25,000. 
Call after 5pm (647) 973-0299. 

1901 YAMAHA SUPER JET 
(stand-up), (ike new, under 
SOhrs. with Karavan Trailer. 
Wei suit. Must see. Must sen. 
$1,60O/best. Waterford area 
(414) 514-2474. 

1993 SEA SPRITE I40hp 
MerCruiser, I/O, great condi- 
tion. $8,000/1*31 (647) 395- 
7319 leave message. 

1997 24FT. PONTOON 
BOAT, 120hp Mercury out- 
board, mooring cover, grill 
and marry extras. Excellent 
condition, used very little. 
Brand new trailer, used 2- 
times. Low cost of $15,325. 
(647) 265-6536. 

21 FT. 1071 CORRECT. 
CRAFT 316 V6 inboard. 
820hrs., in good shape, great 
for wakeboarding, $3,495. 
(414) 767-8728. 



8-1/2 JOHNSON DUCK 
HUNTING MOTOR, runs 
OOOd, $285/bo St. (414) 
694-3747. 

BLUE AND WHITE 16ft. 2- 
man Open Cockpit Sail Boat. 
Comes with motor and trailer. 
Excellent condition. Best offer, 
(647) 949-9212. 

BOAT 1097 BAYUNER CO- 
BRA, 1600* ski boat, 150hp 
Evinrude. Fresh rebuild, very 
good condrtten, $4,6007best 
(414) 697-3468. 

CATAMARAN 14FT. 

HOBIE Cat with Waller, $600. 
(647) 395-1760. 

CLASS A 1087 MALLARD. 
33fL long, 63K miles, air condl- 
Uoning. generator, microwave, 
$18.000,(414)666-2657. 

CLASSIC WOOD 32FT. 
1967 Chris Craft FrybrWge 
Sea Skiff sport fisherman, 
good condition. $7.000/best. 

ItUTi 9Q*_707« 



FORMULA 1995 242LS, 

5.7L Merc., fully equipped, ex- 
cellent condition, 
$i5,500/best. (647) 
806-9390. 

LUND 17.1/2FT. FISHING 
& PLEASURE BOAT, 4- 
seats, 1995. like new, EZ load- 
er, 100hp Merc. 9.9 Merc kick- 
er, trolling motor (new). VHF 
radio. Lowrance GPS 4 fish lo- 
cator. 2-downriggors (new) 
rods. 2-covers, more. 
St 8.300. (414) 639-0471. 

MASTERCRAFT PRO 

STAR 190, 1988. with trailer 
89.800. Best Good condition 
ready to ski. (815)369-3013 

MOTOR 1993 20HP Marin- 
er, console steering, asking 
$1.400.(414)694-6693. 

MOVING MUST SELL! 

1989 Arriva, 20ft. open bow 
130 Merc, 3.0Liter, boat slip 
for the rest of Ihe year includ- 
ed, $5.000/best. (647) 973- 
1848 after 5pm. 




'*?!*' 



i i '> >M |ii | i j il a»" i — O ' ii ' 'n »i«ii« «■■»- nfi " ^ iii ' ipi T' i' — 



t*- " ' . n i " ' * ■ "•' • ~- •"?— ' W i ' - - 



.•- - ■ mctiv. 



InFiniti 



END OF 

MODEL 

YEAR 

CLEARANCE 

SALE 



I 

I 



New 1999 Infiniti Q45 







ew 1999 Infiniti G20 



r 



MSRP $49,115 
Purchase 

$39,995 




/AUTO, LEATHER, SUNROOF, CONVENE1NCE PACKAGE 
MSRP $23,820 ^_«^„ „ 

Purchase Jfe^ 5 ^-" *■** IT" Va*v 

* 



$20,995 

3.9% APR 

FINANCING FOR 
Vup to 60 MONTHS 



'VI? • I s* 



♦Phis tax, title, license. *You must quaflfy for this price. See dealer f or detafls. 




20 In Stock! 
Just Arrived! Come 



SSiffi 



: «« 




\- :C-l 






FIELDS 

1121 S. Milwaukee Ave. « 



Infiniti 

Libertyville • 



7.362. 





visit us on the web at: www.fieldsauto.com 



RT.120 



3 



RL137 



s 



{ r c u aarTwiu Ep 



8 
RLM 



Fields 
Volvo 




■ ■ ■ 



r 



D8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



October 8, 1999 






\ 



•'• 



of If each JRarh 

Green Bay & Wadsworth • 38900 N. Green Bay Rd, Beach Park, E 

Max L Johnson • Rodney D, Johnson, Sr, 



WE SERVICE ALL MAKES 




tito 





nan 






(847) 625-8400 





IN STOCK 



1994 OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME SL $6,995 

1993 TOYOTA TERCEL $5,495 

1993 FORD PROBE GT $7,995 

1994 BUICK LeSABRE $8,995 

1992 FORD PROBE $6,995 

1993 EAGLE TALON $4,995 

1996 IMPALA SS $14,995 

1996 CHEVY CAVALIER $7,995 

1991 CHEVY S10 4X4 S/C $5,995 

1999 vLuO vlCnM MiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiiiiiii y/|7<!3 

1997 CHEVY BLAZER 4X4 $17,995 

1993 OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME CPE .$8,995 

1991 ucO TRACKER.., , ■■■, ut..$5,495 

1992 FORD F-150 PICK-UP $6,995 

1996 GRAND AM CPE $10,995 

1990 FORD PROBE $4,995 

1986 FORD BRONCO 4X4..,.. $3,495 

1993 FORD MUSTANG LX $5,995 

1996 NISSAN S/C PICK-UP $9,995 

1995 TOYOTA CAMRY LE $9,995 

1994 CHEVY CAMARO T-TOP .....$8,995 

1993 HONDA CIVIC COUPE. $7,995 



CARS, TRUCKS, VANS, 

R.V.s, IMPORTS, 

4X4s, ECONOMYS, 

WAGONS, 
SPORTS, LUXURYS 



1995 HONDA ACCORD $9,995 

1981 VOLKSWAGEN CABRIO $2,995 

1979 VOLVO 265 GL WAGON $2,995 

1993 ASTRO ALL WHEEL DRIVE VAN .$9,995 

1988 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD... ....,.,.$2,995 

1994 BONNEVILLE SSI. . $10,995 

1996 PLYMOUTH BREEZE.. $7,995 

1998 ASTRO CARGO VAN , SAVE 

1995 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA $9495 

1998 DODGE CONVERSION $3995 

1994 CHEVY CONVERSION VAN $10,995 

1994 NISSAN PICK-UP $7,995 

1992 ASTRO CONVERSION VAN $8,995 

1996 CHEVY CORSICA , ..$7,995 

1995 NISSAN ALTIMA $9,995 

1997 CHEVY LUMINA.......... ...Si 0,995 

isf«ft OMiunn OL& 11. mi. ...... ..I in. >9w|""9 

1993 FORD CARGO VAN $6,995 

1992 GMC 1500 PICK-UP $8,495 

1988 TOYOTA TERCEL.... ■■.■••■mi. .,$1,995 

199* lUTwIA i EnvCkiit.ii, an., 1 in. 1 ■■ I... v>})37J 

1998 ASTRO CARGO VAN .....,....$16,995 




BUY HERE 
PAY HERE 

$500 DOWN 



ONLY 



0°/« 



WK. 



INTEREST 



ON SELECT 
MODELS 

*Plus tax, title, and doc fee. 



WE BUY CARS 

RVs, SPORTS, 

ETC. OR 

SELL ON 

CONSIGNMENT 

CALL ED PERRY 

847-625-8400 




We Service What We Sell 



SHOP US FIRS 



r * mi 



Z 

o 
a 



ON THE SPOT 

FINANCING, 

LOW BANK 

RATES, ETC. 



SPECIALS OF THE WEEK 

1996 FORD THUNDERBIRD 
1995 TAURUS WAGON 
1991 TOYOTA TERCEL 
1991 CHEVY CAVALIER 
1991 CAPRICE 



$8,995 
$7,995 
$3,995 
$3,995 
$5,995 



& WARRANTIES 
UP TO 3 YR 
AVAILABLE 
OR 45,000 
ADD'L MILES 




HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9-7, SATURDAY 9-6 



NISSAN 



TRUCK 




Saturn 




Men riles I ten/ 



-*■ w 



October 8, 1999 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



Lakeland Newspapers/DB 



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AOJRA 

PaulyAcuro 

Routts 41 &-2Z, Highland fort 

433-8200 



GOOD 

Audi 



• The Audi Exchange 
5050 Rut St, Highland Port 
432-5020 



© 



• Karl Knauz Motors 

407 Stall* Volley H wy , Lake Bluff 

604-5000 



I1U1CK- 



Anthony Pontiac/ 
GMCTruck/Buick 
7225 Grand Ave, Gurnee 
856-3000 

Knauz of Lake Forest 
1044 N. Western Avt , lake Forejt 
234-2800 
Liberty Auto City ' 
J00O E, Parti Ave, Libertyville 
362-2683 

Mitchell Bu'ick-OUimobile & 
GMC Truck 

903 N. Front Street McHenry 
(815)385-7200 
1 Country Buick/Pontioc 
845 Mam St . Ani-och 
39S4400 




Weil Oldsmobile Cadillac Inc. 

1050 S Milwaukee Aw, UbertyveJe 

362-4100 

Gory Lang Pontiac- 

Cadillac Subaru 

1107 S. Route 31. McHenry 

(815) 385-6000 



CHEVR0t£T 

• Bernard Chevrolel/lsuzu 

1001 5. Milwaukee Ave . Libertyvtlle 
362-1400 

• Boehmer Chevrolet 

4 16 W. Liberty (Rte. 176} Woucondo 
526-2424 

• Classic Chevrolet Inc. 

. 425 N. Green 8oy Rd, Woukegan 
3364300 

• Gary Long Chevrolet 
1107 S. Route 31. McHenry 
(815)385-2100 

• Ray Chevrolet Inc. 
39 N. Route 17. fu Lake 
587-3300 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc 

120 W. Lake St. jRte 173), Antioch 
395-3600 

• Rockenbach Chevrolet 

1000 E Btlvidtte Rd Grayilake 

223-8651 

• Shepard Chevrolet 
930 Carriage Ln . Laie Blult 

234- 7900 



aiittuDt 



Knauz of Lake Forest 

1044 N. Western Ave., lake forest 

234-2800 

Gregory Chrysler/ 
Plymouth/Jeep 

130 Cedar Ave.. Lake Villa 
356-2530 

Sandy McKie & Sons 

Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 

91 S. Route 12. fo« Lake 

587-6471 

Sunnyside DodgeChryilef-Plymouth 

4810 W. Elm St, McHenry 

(815) 385-7220 



Daewoo of Libertyville 

921 S. Milwaukee Ave, Libertyville 

549-9595 




• Antioch Dodge 
105 Rte 173, Antioch 
3950200 

• Gregory Dodge 

<90 SloU B >d. H^Stond Park 
831-5980 

• Gurnee Dodge 

7255 Grand Aw, Wauktgan 
623-3000 

• Miller-Krueger Dodge 

119 N. Mihvoukee Ave . Itbcftyvule 
362-3800 

• Sandy McKie & Sons 
Chrysler-Plymouth Dodge Truck 
91 S. Route 12, fo« lake 
587-6471 

• Sunnyside DodgeChrysler- 
Plymouth 

4810 W, Elm St.. McHenry 
(815) 385-7220 



But i Ford 

3925 W. Route 120, McHenry '. 

(815) 385-2000 

Fox Lake ford-Mercury Inc 
90 S. Routt 12, Fox Lake 
587-3400 

Lyons-Ryan Ford 

104 W. Routt 173, Anttoch 

395-3900 

Celozzi Ford 

3 tOO Grand Avt. (Rte. 132). Woukegan 

336-2340 

Sessler Ford Inc 

1010 S M**autee Ave, lAertywOe 

362-4550 

Victor Ford 

Route 12 (N. of Rte. 176), Woucondo 

526-5541 



Anthony Pontioc/GMC/Buick 

7225 Grand Ave, Gurnet 

856-3000 

Mitchell Buick-Oldsmobile & 

GMC Truck 

903 N. front Street, McHenry 

(815) 385-7200 

Patrick Pontiac-GMC Truck Inc. 
1 120 S. Milwaukee Ave., Ubef lyville 
680-5000 

Pedersen GMC Truck 
Cornen of Rtei 45 4 173. Antioch 
395-3700 




ro 



Paufy Honda 

1111 5. Milwaukee Ave., libertyville 

362-4300 

Rosen Honda 

7000 Grand Avt , Gurnee 

856-8439 




* Liberty Auto Dty 

1000 E. Pork Ave. (176), Ubertyvitfe 
360-2683 

* Gregory Hyundai 

490 Skok'e 8M, H s »- Vd Pork 
831-5980 

* Gurnee Hyundai VW-Olds 

Kte.41 L Wathirsaton St, Gurnet/Wobegon 

249-1300 

INFINITI. 

* Fields Infiniti 

U21S U '.c.l«A,r.l>-,-. « 

362-9200 



ISUZU 



Bernard Chevrolet/lsuru 
1001 S Milwaukee Ave , libertyville 
362-1400 




Country Jeep-Eagle 

3017 W. Route 120, MrHenry 

(815)363-9999 

Delf'sJeep 

1521 Behidere Rd, Woukegan 

623-1492 

Gregory Chrysler/ 

Plymouth/Jeep 

UOCedorAvt, Lok»V«Ua 

356-2530 

Liberty Jeep Eagle 

1000 E Pork Ave, Libertyville 

362-2683 



LAND' 



Land Rover of Lake Bluff 
375 N. Skokie Hwy, lake Bluff 
604-8100 




• Fo« Loke ford/Mercury 
90 S Route 12. Fan Loke 
587-3400 

• Libertyville Lincoln/ Mercury Inc 
941 S, Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
367-1700 

• Lyons-Ryofi Ford-lincotrvMercury Inc 
104 W. Route 173, Antioch 
395-3900 

• Don McCue Lincoln-Mercury Inc 
660 W. NW Hwy. Borrington 
382-5600 

• Rosen Lincoln-Mercury 
7000 Grand Ave.. Gurnee 
856-8439 



Z r A m *Z 



Libertyville Auto City 
1000 E. Park Ave, libertyvitte 
362-2683 

Rosen Mazda 

100 N Green Bay Rd, Woukegan 

662-2400 




Knauz Continental Motors 
407 Skokie Hwy, Lake Bluff 
234-1700 



A 



Libertyville Mitsubishi 

11 19 S. Mirwoukee Ave, libertyville 

816-6660 



flfeWl 



• Liberty Nissan Kia Volkswagen 
921 S Milwaukee Ave., Lbertyville 
630-8000 

• Union Nissan 

3315 Grand Ave. [Rte. 132|. Woultgon 

244-8000 

C2> Ordsmobtto 

• Gurnee Olds VW/Hyundai 

F:t it iW»'^ton St. Gurnet. IfVaUeoan 

249-1300 ' 

• Raymond Chevrolet/ 
Oldsmobile Inc 

120 W. Route 173. Antioch 
395-3600 

• Weil Oldsmobile/Codilloc Inc 
1050 S Mewoukee Ave, Libertyville 
362-4100 

PONTIAC 



YES 



• Anthony Pontioc/GMC Truck/Buick 
7225 Grand Ave, Gurnet 
856-3000 

• Gory Lang Pontiac Cadillac 
& Subaru 

1107 5. Route 31. McHenry 

(615)385-6000 

• Patrick Pontiac GMC Truck Inc 
1 120 5. Milwaukee Ave, UbertyviBe 
680-5000 

• Country Pontiac/Buick 
845 Main Street, Antioch 
39S4400 



The Porsche Exchange 
2050 First St 

Highland Park 
432-5020 




The Saab Exchange 
2300 Skokie Valley Rd (Rte. 41) 
Highland Pork 
432-9300 




SATUtN. 

Solum of Libertyville 

1160 S. Milwaukee Ave, libertyvtlle 

362-6600 

Saturn of Woukegan 

500 S. Green Bay Rd , Woukegan 

360-5000 




Gory Long Pontiac Coditloc Subaru 
1111S. Route 31. McHenry 
(815) 385-6000 

Liberty Subaru 

1000 E- Park Ave, Libertyville 

362-26B3 



$ SUZUKI. 

• Liberty Auto Gty 

1000 E Park Ave., (176) Lbertyville 
362-2683 

® TOYOTA 

• Classic Toyota 

425 S. Green Bay Rd., Woukegan 
336-4300 

• Pauly Toyota 

5417 NW Hwy, Cryitol Loke 
(815)459-7100 




Liberty Nissan Volkswogen/Kia 
921 S. Milwaukee Ave, libertyville 
680-8000 

Gurnee VW Olds Hyundai 
R:i 41 & ViasNngtsn St, Gurntt/Woultgon 
249-1300 

VOLVO 

Fields Volvo ' 

1121 S Milwaukee Ave, Libertyville 

362-9200 



V 



r~. \ 



D10 I Lakeland Newspapers AUTO MARKETPLACE October 8, 1999 

Keep your car running - 
even in the bitter cold 



Unltcry capacity is greatly reduced in 
cold temperatures because of the cold's 
numbing effect on electrochemical ac- 
tion. This means the available cranking 
(starting) power diminishes when the 
temperature falls. For example, a fully 
charged battery in good working condi- 
tion operating at 100% capacity (output) 
at HO degrees will reduce to '10% capacity 
at degrees. In other words, only 40% of 
your battery's rated capacity is available 
to start your vehicle. 

Engine oil stiffens in cold tempera- 
tures and creates further strain on a bat- 
tery for starling the engine. At degrees, 
an engine requires twice the power to 
crank that it requires at 80 degrees when 
using S.A.E. 10W-30 multi-viscosity oil. 

The combined effect of extreme cold 
with the increase in cranking load makes 
your car battery work the hardest when 
you need it the most. 
Maintenance procedures 

By following a regular maintenance 
routine, you will enhance the overall perfor- 
mance and life of your vehicle's battery and 
reduce mechanical wear on your engine's 
starting system. There are outlets, such as a 
specialty battery store, that have testing 
equipment and trained associates who can 
perform battery maintenance for you. 

•Start with a visual inspection. Make 
sure the battery cables are secure and 
battery terminals are free of corrosion. If 
corrosion exists, clean terminals and ca- 
ble ends with a wire brush and a solution 
of bilking soda and water. After rinsing 
and drying, apply an anti-corrosive spray 
or pretreated terminal washers. 

•Loose connections to the battery ter- 
minals should be tightened, 



•Check vent caps. Missing or blocked 
vents can cause leakage, breakage, conta- 
mination or explosion. 

•Check for build-up of acid or mois- 
ture on the cover. Excessive moisture 
around the posts can cause a battery to 
die because voltage will actually travel 
through the moisture and slowly dis- 
charge the battery. Also, keep the battery 
clean because dirt attracts moisture. 

•Keep batteries fully charged to pre- 
vent freezing and possible breakage of the 
battery case. Don't let your vehicle sit for 
more than two weeks in the cold without 
running it. 

•In batteries with removable service 
caps, check electrolyte levels. The elec- 
trolyte level should completely cover the 
separator plates. If the level is low, add 
distilled water to the battery making sure 
plates arc covered. 

•Perform basic battery maintenance 
twice a year. 

•Before buying a new one, have your vehi- 
cle's battery load tested to determine if the 
battery is really the problem. 

If possible, when the mercury drops to 
degrees and below, store your vehicle in a 
heated garage. If now. there are other tech- 
niques to sustain your vehicle's battery in ex- 
treme cold weather. 

For instance, when the temperature is 
predicted to fall, use an engine block 
heater to keep the engine oil warm 
enough to start your vehicle the next 
morning. Another alternative is to put a 
battery charger on your vehicle and leave 
it on overnight at a trickle-charge rate of 1 
to 2 amps. 

For more information, call 1-800-67* 
STANT for the Batteries Plus stare near you. 




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Octobers, 1999 AUTO MARKETPLACE Lakeland Newspapers /D1 1 

Redesigned vehicles score 
well with consumers: study 



Volkswagen, General Motors and Toyota 
(including its Lexus division) have the greatest 
number of new vehicle models that con- 
sumers consider to be "most appealing," ac- 
cording to a just-released J.D. Power study. 

The APEAL Study (Automotive Perfor- 
mance, Execution and layout) asked nearly 
88,000 new-vehicle owners what excites and 
delights them (or "things gone right") about 
their vehicle's features and design. 

Volkswagen's Jctta, GTI, Passat and Decile 
rank highest In their individual car segments, 
while the BMW 3 Scries and 7 Series capture 
the entire luxury and premium luxury seg- 
ments, respectively. The Chevrolet Corvette 
tops the premium sports car segment 

Among trucks, Toyota, Lexus and Honda 
models sweep the popular SUV segments. 
General Motors' new truck entries, the 
Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra, captured 
the top two positions in the high-volume, full- 
size pickup segment. The GMC Savana ranks 



highest among full-size vans, 

In addition, the Dodge Dakota continues 
Its dominance in the compact pickup seg- 
ment, ranking highest for the third year in a 
row. .The newly redesigned Honda Odyssey is 
the top performer in the compact van seg- 
ment 

"Although new and redesigned vehicles 
tend to stand out from other models, our 
trend data shows that this phenomenon is de- 
creasing said J.D. Power's Jacques daCosta. 
"Successful new model launches will be those 
that attract consumers with a balance of inno- 
vative styling, new technologies, vehicle per- 
formance and interior and safety features." 

The 1999 APEAL study examined eight 
specific areas of vehicle performance and de- 
sign: Vehicle Styling: Engine and Powenrain; 
Comfort and Convenience; Ride and Han- 
dling; Scats; Heating, Cooling and Ventilation; 
Cockpit and Instrument Panel; and Sound 
System. 



Top three models in 
15 major categories 



Compact 



Most Appealing: 
Volkswagen Beetle 
Volkswagen Golf 
Plymouth Neon (2000) 



Entry Midsize 



Most Appealing: 

Volkswagen Jetta 
Pontiac Grand Am 
Daewoo Leganza 



Premium Midsize 



Most Appealing: 

Volkswagen Passat 
Pontiac Grand Prix 
Toyota Avalon 



Sporty Car 



Most Appealing: 
Volkswagen GTI 
Honda Prelude 
Pontiac Firebird 



Premium Sports Car 



Most Appealing: 

Chevrolet Corvette 
Porsche 91 1 
Porsche Boxster 



Entry Luxury 



Most Appealing: 

BMW 3 Series 
Saab 9-5 
Chrysler 300M 



Premium Luxury 



Most Appealing: 

BMW 7 Series 
Lexus LS 400 
BMW 5 Series 



Most Appealing: 

GMC Savana 
Chevrolet Express 
Ford Econoline 

Source: J.D. Power and Associates 1999 Automotive Performance, Execution 
and Layout (APEAL) Study 



Compact Pickup 



Most Appealing: 

Dodge Dakota 
Toyota Tacoma 
GMC Sonoma 



Compact Pickup 



Most Appealing: 

Chevrolet Silverado 

GMC Sierra 

Ford F-250 Super Duty 



Mini SUV 



Most Appealing: 

Honda CR-V 
Toyota RAV4 
Subaru Forester 



Compact SUV 



Most Appealing: 

Toyota 4 Runner 
Dodge Durango 
GMC Envoy 



Full-Size SUV 



Most Appealing: 

Toyota Land Cruiser 
BMC Yukon/Yukon Denali 
Ford Expedition 



Luxury SUV 



Most Appealing: 

Lexus LX 470 
Lexus RX 300 
Land Rover Range Rover 



Compact Van 



Most Appealing: 

Honda Odyssey 
Toyota Sienna . 
Pontiac Montana 



Full-Size Van 



Snoujplow Headquarter* 




2000 GMC 3/4 Ton Siena 4x4 with Extended Cab 



Snowplow experts for 
over 30 years. 



Check our inventory 
before you buy. 




NEW INVENTORY ARRIVING DAILY! 




QUALITY USED TRADE-INS 



1998 GMC SONOMA 

ExtCiiCilfcpealAC SIKAQK 
aSP^latlfeaiRIWaraiy.. IvftW 



1997 CHEVROLETS10 BUCER 

4Door,4VVheeJOm« t £AliT 
Ai.to.W5. AC. Loaded.. QAVC 



1995 GMC SAFARI VAN «££» 

7Passeng*U5.AltyAC fcAliT 

LsaaBLrtfe^ oHVt 



1994 GMC 3/4 TON 2X4 

ExlCab,V8.4S4. U4 Qflrt 
Alio. AC. Loaded... I I j3UU 



1993 DODGE DAKOTA 

2»*.vs. c 

5 speed, air 



5995 



1933 FORD MUSTANG CONV. LX 

AatxAC 5| 



6495 



1993 GMC 1/2T0N 2X4 

»?* $10,900 



1992 CHEVY LUMINAAPV 

^AiiorraticAV. ^HKBP 1 
7P3sa^ 5495 



1992 LINCOLN T0WNCAR 

.■Ac oiiTs&r sonnc 



1992 GMC 1/2 TON 2X4 
ShotBamtoAC 

ba&L»Mte... 



M 



1992 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 

2Doa.V6.AUo. £AlfT 
A/C. Loaded jtfWE 



1991 GMC 1/2 TON 4X4 

**** s 10,995 



B&kBeaiy. 



T 




PEDERSEN GMC TRUCK 

"The Truck People" 



Family Owned 
Since 1936 



ANTIOCH, IL • 847-395-3700 

Comers of RL 45 1 173 



I 



7 



"OH? 






D 1 2 / Lakeland 'Newspapers 



AUTO MARKETPLACE 



October 8, 1999 




The only dealer you have to shop 





In Fox Lake 



FIVE STAR 



m r\ m 



You'll Like The Way We Do Business 



It's Better...We'll Prove It! 



FIVE STAR 




TRUCK 
HEADQUARTERS 




FINAL CLEARANCE ON ALL REMAINING 

1999 CARS, TRUCKS, MINI VANS. DURANGOS 

ONLY *t 36 LEFT 

SAVINGS, GREAT SELECTION, HUGE REBATES 

2 SEBRING COUPES 1 RAM 1500 4x4 

2 AVENGERS 1 RAM 1500 CLUB CAB 4x4 

4 SEBRING CONVERTIBLES 1 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 

2 CONCORDES 4 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4x4's 
1 300M 1 RAM 2500 QUAD CAB 4x4 
1 GRAND VOYAGER SE 1 RAM 3500 QUAD CAB 4x4, 

3 GRAND CARAVAN SE 12 DURANGOS 





BAL = BALANCE OF FACTORY 



USED CAR WARRANTY GUIDE 

6/6 = 6 MONTH/6000 MILE 3/3 = 3 MONTH/3000 MILE 



Al = AS IS. NO WARRANTY 




5 TO CHOOSE FROM 

98 GRAND CARAVAN & 
98 GRAND VOYAGER SE 

Fully Loaded With Rear Air 
ALL THIS FOR 

M7,995 



CLEARANCE 
CARS 



'93 OLDS 
DELTA LSS 

Stock 17-8147. 53K miles) c OEO * 
Old's nicest car, *0»TF J 

Warranty: B/a 



'96 SATURN 
COUPE 

Stock #7-8141. We sell SOiEAC 

Satums lor less. U>"tJ 

Warranty: S/6 



'93 FORD 
ESCORT WAGON 

Slock 17-8145, Auto., S911A 

air, save. *JIIU 

Warranty: Al 



'98 DODGE 
NEON SPORT 

Stock I7-8144. 2 door, <|^ EOT 

rr.ooMOOf, save. IU?9t3 

Warranty: BAL 



'92 CHEVY 
CAVALIER RS 

Slock 17-8139. Make $*)EEE 

it go away. «■?■» 

Warranty. Al 



'96 CHRYSLER 
CONCORDE 



'97 DODGE 
NEON 

Slock 16-0082. 4 door, < or CO 
auto., air. *0>3O 



98 PLYMOUTH 
E 

H1,685 



Stock #5-8075. Loaded. 
new car alternative. 



Warranty; BAL 



'96 CHEVY 
LURHNA 

Stock #5-8072. Nice 
car, nice miles. 



*8995 

Warranty: tVS 



'94 FORD TWRD 
SUPER CPE. 

Stock IS6066. Ready * **■ 
to leave. QT7J 

Warranty: aVfl 



'97 CHRYSLER 
CHiOS 



Slock #3-7034. 21K ml., 
moonrool, loaded. 



M1.995 

Warranty: BAL 



'95 DODGE 

MTREPBES 

Stock 14-8076. Great 
value at this price. 



*8731 

Warranty: •» 



'98 FORD 
CONTOUR 

Stock #3-6991. Loaded SQEIC 

Warranty: •* 



unit, save. 



Warranty: em 



'95 CHRYSLER 

CIRRUS 

15-8042. Save $6995 

Warranty: <vo 



I a great deal. 




Stock .'6-8122. A great 
car, a great price, 



M0.995 

Warranty: art 



'95 FORD 
THUNDER8MD 

Stock 1*8096. VB SA27T 

motor, loaded. _ . ... 

Warranty: tie 



WE HONOR All CREDIT UNION AND CORPORATE PRICING PUNS 

•Bad Credit •No Credit 

•Repossession •Judge m ents 

• 1st Time Buyer 

Or, for a personal 
Interview, call 

Extension 2 at 

(847) 587-6473 



Call Today and Drive Away! 

(800) 501-9702 

Automata* Ctadli Approiat Holllna 

No Mania* • No Pipanaoik 

• No Embarraaamanl 

24 HoMii A Pay. 7 Put A Waafc 



'99 DODGE 
DURANGO SLT PLUS 

Stock 1 74170T. Lea- *» fkgkm 
ther, wood grain, save. */,▼"■? 

Warranty: BAL 



'92 PLYMOUTH 
VOYAGER 



Stock I&S134T. Auto., 
air, basic transportation. 



$ S995 

Warranty. Al 



'97 CHEVY 
8LAZER IS 4x4 

Stock 1*81 25T. %iy AA _ 

Loaded, extra clean. 1 7, 77 3 

Warranty: CJtt 



98 EDDft RAUER 



Slock IW120T. You *. a Afte 
can*l beat this, *»1TF,TTJ 

Warranty: BAL 



'98 DODGE 
GRAND CARAVAN SE 

Stock IM024T. New |«i Ef E 
van alternative. I # f *# 9 

Warranty: BAL 



96 DODGE DAKOTA 
OLUR 4x4 

Stock I3-7004T. V8, «... -* c 

pW. pi, till. CC '19,/aO 

Warranty: •/• 



FIVEST*R 



(HKYSLHK 

Vlymouttj 

Dodge 



91 S. Route 12 
Fox Lake 

www.sandymckiedodge.com 

(847) 

587-6473 





IN FOX LAKE 



"nnummiomimi" 







» M ^ —■■».»JO • 






LIFE'S A BEAR 

Today's telephone 
technology answered /B2 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'Double Jeopardy': Don't 
give it a second glance VB5 



KIDS KORNER 

Have fun learning with 
games & puzzles / B6 



ULLOU 
SECTIOr 




Section 




j* 



Lakeland Newspapers October 1 - 7, 1999 



Harvest o 






Other pick-your-own 

fruit orchards 

in the area: 

Quig's Orchard. 

300S.IU85 

(1/4 mile norlli^IJdJoihian Rd.) 

-Murraelcin- 




store 

and 

Tues. thru Su 



mtry 

ayndes 



liday events, Orari^ar-round 

n* Call 566-4520. ". ^\ 

Zieffler^0rchard 

323G3N-r 

CraY 






- m 



■■ 






/ 



• 




. •* ■ . 







Features pick^y. 



goods, plajjt 
>pe 




John Knight, 2, and William Kaplan, 3. both of 
Grayslake, take turns munching on freshly picked rasp- 
berries at Glunz Farms In Grayslake, where residents 



By ANGELA D.SYKORA 
Staff Reporter 




Fei ., 
sonandp 
farmstan 
lovve 
t-9 a;m.'7^blii 



It's the time of the season when the air 
gets crisp, the leaves begin to turn, 
and area farmers show off the fruits of 
their labor. The best of the fall harvest 
in not at the grocery store— it is still out- 
side, lingering on the vine, ripening to 
sweet perfection and waiting to be picked. 
, At Glunz Farms in Grayslake, the rasp- 
berries are peaking, and with five acres of 
fruit to pick from, all that is left to do is 
grab a carton and stake out a good spot. 

Glunz Farms, family owned for gener- 
ations, offered its first harvest of raspber- • 
ries to the public in 1997. The locals come 
back every year like clockwork to get their 
fill. 

"It's the freshest. Every berry is the ultimate berry," said regu- 
lar Carol McConnell, of Gurnee, who stops in at least once a week 
to gather raspberries for herself and the staff of the Warren-New- 
port Library- 



Joseph Glunz, Jr. 
discusses the fresh 
raspberries offered 
at Glunz Farms. — 
Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



have been flocking every year around this time since 

1997. : — Photo by Sandy Bressner , 



"We eat 'em like popcorn," she said. 

Glunz Farms grows a vajpety of raspberries including Autumn 
Bliss and Heritage. It was a good summer for them too, despite the 
lack of rain, said Joseph B. Glunz, Jr., vice president. 

"We love drought situations," said Glunz, who explained how 
the farm has its own irrigation system that allows them to control 
how much water the raspberries receive. 

Last year, extreme humidity and wetness created mold that 
killed a third of their crop. This year, the berries are flourishing. 

Glunz credits their appeal with the fact that absolutely no pes- 
ticides are sprayed on the raspberries. 

"It's totally clean fruit— as dose as you can get to nature," said 
Glunz. 

Another reason customers prefer their raspberries over those 
store-bought, said Glunz, is because store-bought raspberries have 
not been able to ripen naturally, and are therefore, not as sweet 
and delicious as they could be. 

"Our raspberries hang out on the vine until they're ripe; then 
they come off," he said. 

Glunz explained that grocers receive shipments of berries that 
were probably picked too early. 

Please see HARVEST / B2 



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&2£/Lakckmd Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



October 1, 1999 



FROM PAGE Bl 

HARVEST: Pick-your-own 
farms offer delicious fun 



"They pull them off while they're 
still tart. They'll ripen on their own- 
as in getting soft and dark, but they t 
won't gel nny sweeter," he noted. 

Joyce Peterson, of Wildwood, 
spent an hour and a half easy, pick* 
ing a dozen or so pints of raspberries. 

"It's so nice to have this here. I 
make alot or preserves. These rasp- 
berries arc so much fresher and taste 
better (than store-bought)," she said. 

In addition to raspberries, Glunz 
Fanns has a quarter acre of pick- 
your-own herbs Including basil, 
thyme, sage, chive and orcgano. 

Raspberry season at Glunz Farms 
runs from mid-August until the first 
frost, which is usually mid-October. 
When the season is over, die remain- 
ing berries are picked and used to ; 
make raspberry wine, a local favorite. 

Four generations of die Glunz 
family have imported, distributed, 
produced and bottled fine wines In 
Illinois for more than 1 10 years. 

Glunz Family Winery & Cellars 
has a tasting and retail room where 
customers can choose from a variety 
of specialty wines from recipes 
passed down from' generation to 
generation, said manager Suzzie 
(Glunz) Holtgreivc. 

Their popular May Wine, made 
from the dried herb woodruff, is an 
old Gemian recipe "learned from 
grandpa." 

The much sought-after raspberry 
wine will hopefully be ready just in 
dine for Thanksgiving, said Holt- 
greive. 

Future plans include building a 
larger winery on die property, and a 
restaurant with an English pub. The 
project should be completed in ap- 
proximately two years, said Glunz. 




Joseph Glunz, Jr. displays one of 
the many types of fresh raspber- 
ries offered at Glunz Farms in 
Grayslake, where visitors may 
also pick their own herbs.— Pho- 
to by Sandy Bressner 

Glunz Farms encourages groups 
of at least 25 people to organize their 
own "Charity Harvest Day" between 
Monday and Thursday. The farm will 
donate between 25 and 50 percent of 
the proceeds, depending on group 
size, to their charity. 

On Oct. 2 at 1 1 a.m., the winery 
will offer a jam and jelly making class. 
The class will last about two hours 
and the cost is S3 per person. 

The winery, located at 88B E 
Belvidere Road, Ste.109, in Grayslake, 
is open Wednesday through Satur- 
day from 10 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sunday 
noon-5 p.m. They can be contacted 
at 548-9463. 

Glunz Farms is located on 19610 
Washington Street, Grayslake, next to 
the College of Lake County between 
routes 45 arid 83. They are open sev- 
en days a week from 10 a.m.-6p.m. 
for raspberry and herb picking. Pre- 
picked berries and herbs are also 
available. 

For further information, contact 
Glunz Farms at 546-6687. 



■ 

Call me irresponsible, but 
I'm not answering 



Today's column takes a clos- 
er look at today's telephone 
technology and Its affect on 
our culture by posing (he 
following deep, psychological ques- 
tion: 

"If a telephone rings in the 
woods, is it the Blair Witch calling? 
And should you answer it, or just let 
it go to voice mail?" 

The reason I am asking Uiat 
question is because, depending on 
your answer, most of us would fall 
into one of two categories: 
1 l.Atelephile 

2. A tclephobc 

By my way of thinking, (which, I 
freely admit, does not always fall un- 
der the category "normal") you are a 
"telcphilc'* if you would feel com- 
pelled to answer that telephone ring- 
ing in Uie woods. Those who would 
just let ft go to voice mail arc "tele- 
phones." So what does the Blair 
Witch have to do with It? Nothing, 
unless she calls you often, In which 
case you fall into category number 
three: A nut. 

Anyway, let's get back to our two 
main categories. First off, if you are a 
telcphilc, there's no need to worry- 
it only SOUNDS like "pedophile." 
You are not in any danger of having 
your name listed on die internet be- 
cause, frankly, there are way too 
many of you people. Also, if you are 
a telcphilc and a smoker, I do not 
want to be on the same highway 
with you, unless you have three 
hands. 

The reason a telcphilc will an- 
swer a telephone ringing in the 
woods is because they believe that 
God was actually speaking directly 



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LIFE'S 
A BEAR 

Donna Abear 



through Hugh Downs (of "20/20" 
Tame) each week when he said: 
"We're in touch, so YOU be in 
touch." Tclcphilcs live In mortal fear 
of missing a call. They have phones 
all over their home; they have 
portable phones, they have cell 
phones, they have beepers. They are 
NEVER more than a few Inches from 
a phone, as you will eventually dis- 
cover one day when you hear the 
flushing sound In the background. It 
is NOT Uie sump pump. 

A telcphobc, on the other hand, 
is not what you may think. Tele- 
phobes are not afraid of telephones. 
They are, however, afraid that the 
telephone will control their life and 
turn them into tclcphilcs. Many tcle- 
phobes have caller ID and voice mail 
so that diey can... make a note here, 
you telephlles... CHOOSE when to 
answer their phone. They often do 
not, however, have call waiting be- 
cause Utey feel it Is rude. 

You will not hear the flushing 
sound when you call a telcphobc. 
You cannot reach them at the gro- 
cery store or during a quiet walk in 
the woods. You definitely cannot 
reach them when the kids'are gone 
for the evening. 

Like a telcphobc, a telcphilc will 
also have all the add-on "conve- 
nience features" for their phone, 
such as caller ID and voice mail; 
however, It is not the "convenience" 
they are interested in. They order 
caller ID, for instance, not to screen 
calls but so that if, God forbid, you 



do not leave a message, they will still 
know you called and can call you 
back. They don't order voice mail for 
those times when they arc too busy 
to answer the phone; they are NEV- 
ER too busy to answer the phone. 
They order voice mail just in case 
you can't reach them because they 
were in die hospital under anesthe- 
sia and having surgery, Irfwhlch 
case, they might not have heard their 
cell phone ring because those dam 
hospital gowns not only are missing 
a backside, they have no pockets for 
their precious phone! 

Marriage can be frustrating if you 
fall Into opposite categories. My hus- 
band, for example, Is a telcphilc. De- 
spite the fact that wc have an answer- 
ing machine, caller ID and voice 
mail, if the phone rings my husband 
will run breathlessly through the 
house, trip over toys and slide into a 
full bowl of dog water, just In time to 
reach the phone before the third ring 
and hear someone say, "Hello? Could 
I speak to Mr, or Mrs. Uh Beer? 

My mothcr-In-law Is the same 
way. She gets Irritated If she calls and 
I don't answer, because she knows 
wc have call waiting. But there are 
times when I just don't want to an- 
swer the call waiting beep. When 
someone Is pouring out their heart 
to me on the phone — "Really, I am 
> so distraught 1 could grab a Ginsu 
knife and carve myself— I find i t 
hard to say "Hold that thought I 
have another call." 

Still, despite differing attitudes 
toward telephone technology, I be- 
lieve that telephlles and telcphobes 
can co-exist in our society if they just 
remember one important fact: 

Witches don't need phones. 

Questions or, comments for 
humorist Donna Abear can be sent to 
P.O. Box 391, Antioch, 11 60002. 



HOROSCOPE 



Arios- March 21 /April 20 
Don't let your emotions get the best . 
of you when it comes to a disagree- 
ment with a loved one early in the 
week, Aries. He or she just wants to 
help you make a difficult decision. 
Listen to what this person has to say. 
It will be worth it. A close friend 
needs your help with a personal 
problem. Be there for him or her. 
Taurus - April 21/May 21 
Bite your tongue when it comes to a 
discussion with a close friend. Even 
though you have a valid argument, 
this person doesn't want to hear it. 
He or she already has his or her 
mind made up. Your opinion only will 
create bad feelings between the two 
of you. That special someono asks 
you an Important question. Be honest 
when answering. 
Gemini - May 22/June 21 
Don't be alarmed if you are forgetting 
things this week, Gemini. You have a 
lot on your mind. Just try to slay 
calm. Things will settle down by the 
week's end. A close friend introduces 
you to an interesting person. Get to 
know him or her better. Leo plays an 
important role on Thursday. 
Cancer -June 22/July 22 
While you don't like to make the first 
move, you're going to have to when It 
comes to your career early In the 
week, Cancer. Initiate a conversation 
with the higher-ups, If you present 
your case logically, they will listen to 
your requests. An acquaintance asks 
to borrow money. Say no. 
Leo - July 23/August 23 
■Don't stay angry at a loved one who 
makes a mistake. He or she doesn't 
mean to upset you, and the entire sit- 
uation doesn't create a lot of prob- 
lems for you. So, forgive and forget. 
A close friend offers you romantic ad- 
vice. Listen to what he or she has to 
say. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 
You have an important decision to 
make on Wednesday, Virgo. Don't 
tako it lightly. Your choice will affect 
several people. Consider all of the 
pros and cons before deciding. It you 
need advice, turn to that special 
someone. He or she won't steer you 



wrong. Cancer plays a key role. 
Libra -Sept 23/Oct 23 
Don't let a bad experience eariy in 
the week ruin your mood, Libra. It's a 
minor event that doesn't have any 
consequences: lot It go.* The person' 
whom you've been seeing wants to 
Intensify Jhe relationship. Think about 
what you really want before agreeing 
to this. Consider your feelings — not 
Just the other person's. 
Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Don't get overly excited about a job 
prospect. It's not as good as it 
sounds. Consider all of the pros and 
dons before making a decision #boui 
your current position. Remember, 
what you decide to do won't just af- 
fect you. A good friend needs a 
shoulder to cry on. Be there for him 
or her, and try to be supportive. 
Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Keep your temper in check when an 
acquaintance says something that he 
or she shouldn't. This person is trying 
to get you upset; don't give htm or 
her that satisfaction. Ignore what Is 
said. A loved one needs help with a 
family problem. Do what you can. 
Aquarius plays an Important role. 
Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
You have a lot to do this week, 
Capricorn. Don't let friengs and Joved 
ones distract you from the tasks at 
hand. Stay focused, and you're sure 
to get things done. A co-worker 
wants to get to know you better. Be- 
fore you get involved with him or her, 
think about how this could affect your 
career. Is it worth it? 
Aquarius- Jan 21 /Feb 18 
Don't bite off more than you can 
chew early In the woek, There are a 
lot of things that you could get In- 
volved with, but you won't be able to 
finish them all. Only do those things 
that are most important to you. That's 
all you have time for this week.' 
Plscos - Feb 19/March 20 
Keep your sense of humor about you 
.this week, Pisces, because there is a 
lot going on. Don't let the stress get 
to you. Your jokes will keep you — 
and those around you — on an even 
keel. Sagittarius plays an important 
role on Wednesday, 



i 



- — — - ; -if m^mr—;*fr'. 



October 1, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



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Nancy Kerrigan stars in 
'Grease on Ice' at the 

Allstate Arena 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

'Grease On Ice' starring Olympic 
Medalist Nancy Kerrigan 

Tickets are now on sale for the 
Chicago-area premiere of a 
favorite '50s style musical 
with a new twist as Grease on 
Ice glides into Roscmont's Allstate 
Arena (formerly Roscmcnt Horizon) 
September 24-26 and skates over to 
Chicago's United Center, October 1-3. 
Grease on Ice stars two-time Olympic 
medalist Nancy Kerrigan as Sandy, the 
naive high school transfer student In 
love with Danny, the cool leader of the 
T-Birds. Two-time U.S. National 
Champion Scott Davis is Danny. 

The notion of taking this classic 
stage/film production to the ice rink 
has die-hard fans scratching their 
heads. Under the direction of award- 
winning choreographer Barry Lather, 
renowned for his work with rock sen- 
sations like Janet Jackson and Paula 
Abdul, as well as skating favorite Kristi 

Yamaguchl, tills American favorite rocks on the ice in ways fans never 
expect. The result is an aggressive, high energy "rock in the rink" mu- 
sical the Grease fans love. , 

Tickets for Grease on Ice ate on sale at the Allstate Arena Box Of- 
fice (formerly Hosemont Horizon), 6920 N. Mannheim Road, The 
United Center Box Office, 1901 VV. Madison St., and allTIcketmaster 
locations. To order tickets by phone, call (312) 455*7469 for United 
Center tickets. For general show information, call the Allstate Arena 
at 635-6601 or the United Center at (312) 455-4500. 

# 

Jazz Dance Chicago announces programs 

Gus Giordano Jazz Dance Chicago announces the program for its 
dance concerts Oct. 1 -3 at the Athenaeum Theater, the company's 
only 1999 Chicago performances. Featured at all three concerts Is the , 

world premiere of be Grand 
Futurls Herd, which recent- 
ly thrilled the Dance for Life 
Benefit audience. 
All three concerts begin 
with the audience favorite, 
Randy Duncan's Can't Take 
This Away. The Friday con- 
cert also Includes the be Fire* 
bird de Jazz, choreographed 
by Gus and Nan Giordano. 
Saturday's program Includes 
Unarmed, a company pre- 
miere solo choreographed 
by Randy Duncan, Be Still 
My Heart, and Qiain of Rocks, Sunday's Matinee concert also In- 
cludes he Firebird tie Jazz and Gus Giordano's "swing" piece Sing, 
Sing, Sing. 

The GGJDC concerts arc Friday and Saturday, October 1 -2 at a 
p.m., and Sunday, October 3, at 3 p.m., at the Athenaeum Theater, 
2936 N. Southport, Chicago. For tickets (S20 adults/515 seniors, chil- 
dren & students) call 312-902-1500. A benefit for GGJDC on Friday 
October Lwtll include special reserved seats for the concert and a 
post-concert party with dancers and other special guests. To make 
reservations, call 866-6779. The Chicago concerts and the October 1 
benefit are sponsored by Evanston and Lincoln Park Athletic Clubs. 





Results of all State 
LOTTERIES 

hack one full year! 

1-900-896-3332 

' Only $.99 per minute 

I HHIlt At l» 



ffpW&Jm 

\<&J/ Presents \^>]| 

^ Broadway Bound ^* 

A Comedy by Neil Simon 
Directed by Mickey Eckmann Mandel 

October 1 , 2, 8, 9 

at 8:00 p.m. 

October 3,1 

at 2:30 p.m. 

Frl. & Sat. 8 p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antloch 
Box Office Now Open 

DC Olice Hour* Mori . Uvu Thur* 5.30-7 30 pm; Sal 1 12 j^TS) 



THEATRE 



'Nunsense' runs 
through Oct. 3 

CcntcrLfght Sign & Voice Theatre 
of Northbrook presents this comedy 
through Oct. 3. The theatre is located 
3444 Dundee Rd., Northbrook. 

For more Information please call 
559-0110. 

'Broadway Bound' 
at PM&L 

There are two more weekends of 
. performances for PNLThcatre's pro- 
duction of Nell Simon's, Broadway 
Bound. Third In an autobiographical, 
trilogy, it picks up where Brighton 
Beach Memoirs and Biloxi Blues end- 
ed. Remaining show dates are Octo- 
ber 1-2, 8-9 at 8 p.m.; October 3 and 
10 fit 2:30 p.m. The PM&L Theatre is 
located at 877 N. Main Street (R t. 83), 
Antloch. 

Mickey Mandel from Antloch is 
the Director. Cast members are Linda 
Hachmeistcr, Kevin Count, and Gerry 
Mandel from Antloch; Linda Mason 
• and Steve VVJUding from U nden hurst 
and Chuck Lindas from Kenosha, WI. 

For reservations call 395-3055. 
Ticket prices are $10 for adults and $8 
for students and seniors. Season tick- 
ets are also available: $50 for adults 
and $40 for students and seniors. This 
will give you six shows for the price of 
five. 



HEALTH 






......... ...i.- - 



Infant Massage Classes 
Offered at Gorton 

"Infant Massage: Loving Touch to 
Grow On" will be held monthly at 
Gorton Community Center, 400 East 
Illinois Road, Lake Forest Sessions 
arc $35 each, and will take place from 
1 030 am- 1230 pm The next classes 
are scheduled for October 12, Novem- 
ber 9 and December 14. Parents or 
caregivers may take classes on an In- 



dividual bails or one per mo n th . 

Ellen Wlnlck, Nationally Certified 
Massage Therapist, will lead this In* 
structlonal course for parents and 
their babies, newborn through pre* 
crawling. Parents will learn basic mas- 
sage techniques and share the healing 
and bonding power of touch. 

Interested participants should 
register and pay in advance. For fur- 
ther information, or to receive a pro- 
gram brochure, contact or stop by the 
Gorton office at 234-6060 between 9 
am and 430 pm, weekdays. 

j^Trms '_ 

Apple Fest ait 
Studio of Long Grove 

In celebration of the 7th Annual 
Long Grove Apple Festival, Oct 1-3, 
the Studio of Long Grove, 360 Histori- 
cal Lane, will conduct an art auction 
of all represented artists at 7 p.m. on 
Friday, Oct 1 In the main gallery. A 
preview and reception for invited 
guests and the public will begin at 6 
p.m. 

Works by American artists Allan 
Wolton and Howard Behrens as well 
as international artists including Roy 
Fairchild, Jurgcn Gorg, and Ting Shao 
Kuang will be on display. Some 
bronze sculpture will be auctioned off 
as well. During the weekend of Apple 
Fest, die Studio will present a large se- 
lection of specially priced paintings. 
For further Information, call 634- 
4244. 

Farm Museum holds 
"Harvest Days"; 

Garfield Farm museum will hold 
its annual Fall Harvest Days on Sun- 
day, Oct. 3 and Sunday, Oct. 10. 

Harvest Days feature historic 
farm and household skill demonstra- 
tions at this 1840$ farm and teamster 
inn. Music, tall tales, food, and tours 
of the 1846 Inn are offered. 

Hours are 1 1 am to 430 p.m. 
The museum Is 5 miles west of Gene- 
va, off of Rl 38 on Garfield Rd. 



Adult donation is $5 and $2 for 
children under 13, Youth groups un- 
der 13 arc $3.50 per student Call 630- 
584-B485 for more information. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

Pet-Athlon benefit 

On Sunday, Oct 3, Save-A-Pet will 
hold its 13th Pet-Athlon at the Old 
School Forest Preserve on St. Mary's* 
Rd. In Libenyvillc. Proceeds will bene- 
fit the homeless dogs and cats at the 
shelter at 31664 N. Fairfield Rd. In 
Grayslake. Registration begins at 9 
a.m. and walk start time Is from 9 a.m. 
to noon. 

- Walkers arc allowed to bring their 
dog for the 4 -mile route around the 
beautiful lake, or they may walk 
alone. Dogs must be on a leash with a 
snug collar. Proof of rabies shot must 
be shown at registration. 

Prizes will be awarded to the top 
three money raisers, and those col- 
lecting $50 or more in pledges will re- 
ceive the special Pet-Athlon t-shirt 

Call Kathy for further information 
at 697-0574. 

Whftetails Unlimited 
holds banquet 

Whitctails Unlimited is sponsor- 
ing the Fox Valley Chapter Fun drai s- 
ing Banquet on Tuesday, Oct. 5, at 
Hob Nob, 44 19 Northwest Hwy. In 
Crystal Lake. This special event will 
feature a roast chicken and roast beef 
family style dinner, auction, door 
prizes, sporting equipment, limited 
edition wildlife/outdoor art, and WTU 
collectibles. Proceeds will go toward 
local conservation projects. 

The social hour begins at 530 
p.m. with dinner at 7: 1 5 p.m. Tickets 
are $35 each or $55 a couple, or $22 
for juniors 15 & under. There is an 
Oct. 4 deadline for tickets. Tickets will 
not be sold at die door. Price includes 
dinner and one membership. 

For reservations, call Martin or 
Karen Dzlerzbick, 815-344-4696, 

Continued on the next page 



Goddess Gourd Festival to be held Oct 9-10 

Featuring America's Jinest gourd artists 






For a unique experience, why 
not check out fills special festival 
celebrating and honoring the 
earth and all of its abundance. 

It will be held on October 9 - 
10, at Prairie Crossing in 
Grayslake, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
(rain or shine). 

Artists demonstrations will be 
conducted besides a large variety 
of activities such as hayrides, sto- 
rytelling, music and craft sales. 

Seventeen of America's 
award-winning finest will be rep- 
resented at this festival. These 
artists travel to the Goddess 
■ Gourd Festival from as far as Cali- 
fornia, Washington, North Caroli- 
na, Ohio, Kentucky and as near as Illinois and Indiana. 
Some grow their own gourds. Each brings a unique vi- 
sion, insired by a passionate involvement with the 
world's oldest cultivated plant. Through their artistry, 
they honor the earth! 

This Harvest Festival celebrates the four year 2000 




Garden Millennium Project be- 
gun In 1996, culminating next 
summer with the burying of a 
Gourd Time Capsule. Through 
conscious community effort, gar- 
deners locally and around the 
country, have cultivated their 
fields of dreams to discover the 
fragile entanglement of our com- 
mon roots. The gourd, oldest of 
plants grown and used by hu - 
manity, full of seeds of furure 
promise, becomes a symbol of 
Earth Herself, giving birth to the 



* -tin BBiui nnaciii muig uhui hi uh 

These are examples of gourd Wren possibility and urgency of gobal 
houses which may be purchased at cooperation, trust and respect 



the festival. 



We celebrate her legendary 
cross-cultural service and take 
her promise forward Into the gardens of die future. 

Prairie Crossing is on Route 45, 1/2 mile south of 
Route 12, in Grayslake. Admission is $3, children can at- 
tend free of charge. 

For further Information call 773-267-24 13 or visit 
their website: happypages.com/goddessgourdfesrival. 




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B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



October 1, 1999 



Och 



' Con tin uedfrom the previous page 

David or Lisa Dlclak, 708-658-6872, or 
call WTU National headquarters at 1- 
800-274 -5471. 

Moondance Gala 

The Auxiliary Board of North- 
western Memorial Hospital will host 
its 1 1th Annual Moondance on Fri- 
day, Oct. 1 , at Winner Garden In the 
Harold Washington Library, located 
at 400 S. State St., Chicago. The gala 
will benefit Northwestern Memori- 
al's Bone Marrow Transplant pro- 
gram. 

The evening begins at 7 p.m. an 
estimated 500 are expected to enjoy a 
sit-down dinner, silent auction and 
the music of Gentleman of Leisure. 
Tickets for Moondance are SI 00 per 
ticket for dinner and dancing and $60 
per ticket far dancing only. For more 
information, contact Meredith Mann 
of Northwestern Memorial Founda- • 
tion at (312) 926-6360. 



CLASSES 



'Junior Sew-Ciety' 
continues at Gorton 

"Junior Scw-cicty," a stitching 



and sewing continual workshop for 
girls aged 6 and older, continues at 
Gorton Community Center, 400 Hast 
Illinois Rd., Lake Forest. Meetings are 
set for October 9 and 23; November 6 
and 20; and December 1, from 1:30- 
3:30 p.m. 

Interested participants should 
register and pay In advance. For fur- 
ther information, or to receive a 
Erogram brochure, contact or stop 
y the Gorton office at 234-6060 be- 
tween 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., week- 
days. 



ART 



Terra Museum 
family fair Oct 3 

Children , ages 5-12, and their 
parents will use Samuel Morse's 
'Gallery of the Louvre,' a painting In 
the Terra Museum of American 
Art's permanent collection, as in- 
spiration for drawing their own 
works of art in the galleries at the 
monthly Family Fair to be held at 
Terra Museum, 664 N. Michigan 
Av., Chicago, on Sunday, Oct. 3, 
from I p.m. to 3 p.m. 

There is no admission charge, but 
reservations are required. Call (312) 
654-2255 Monday through Friday. 



CROSSWORD 



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ACROSS 

1 . Encase 
5. Members 

10. Pop 

14. Fencing sword 

15. Mineral 

16. Opaque gem 

17. Toiler's Utopia 

20. Organic compounds 

21. S. China seaport 

22. student, learns healing 

23. Content 
25. Crowds 
29. Ordinal 

33. About bee 

34. Cablegram, abbr. 

35. Greek letter 

36. Person who is tricked or swindled 
3B. Flowers 

41 . East northeast 

42. Recreates 

44. Corpulent 

45. Provencal verses 

48. Emergencies 

49. Paragon 

50. Macaws 

51 . Hostile person who tries to do , 
damage to you 

54. Neurological disease 
59. Berlin hit 

62. German woman's name 

63. Jim , rock singer 

64. Growl - 

65. Person with unusual powers 
of foresight 

66. Uses 

67. Giant 

DOWN 

LFlow 

2. S. American armadillo with 
three bands of bony plates 

3. Mackerel 

4. European 

5. The sum of a finite or infinite 
sequence of expressions 
'6. Better • • 

7. Canoodles 

6. Denotes three 
9. Scottish County, abbr, 

10. Cushltlc 

11. OH cartel 

1 2. Carvey, comedian 

13. Vocalist 

16. Mocha citizen . 

19, Utter sounds 



23. Bearings 

24. Crossbar 

25. Individuals 

26. Declare 

27. Cereals 

28. Audiotape 

29. Quantitative facts 

30. Sea eagles 

31. Not those 

32. Tubings 

37. Hand (Spanish) 

39. Esprit de corps 

40. Faith 

43. UC Berkeley 

46. Add trees 

47. Romantic interlude 
48.' Transgressions 

50. Keep up 

51. Armor plating 

52. Not one 

53. Meet 

54. Stock purchase plan 

55. Consequent 

56. Sharp high-pitched metallic sound 

57. Blemish 

58. Agile, lively 

60. Shock treatment 

61. No seats available 



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HOBBY 



Gem & Mineral Show 
to be held 

The Lake County Gem & Mineral 
Society Is holding Its 34th annual 
show titled "Wondcrlnnd of Gems* 
Jewelry and Minerals" Oct. 8-10 at the 
Mundelein I loliday Inn on State Rtc. 
45 & 83 In Mundelein. Tire hours are 
Fri. 2*6 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun. 
10 a.m.*5 p.m. Entry fee for adults Is 
$2; seniors 62 and over arc half price 
and children under age 12 no charge. 

For more infarmntion, call 223- 
5445 or 546-5382. 



MUSIC 



Jazz legend Ahmad 
Jamal at Fermilab 

Ahmad Jamal, a legend among 
Chicago jazz fans, opens the 1 999- 
2000 Arts Scries at Fermilab. Jamal 
last appeared at Fermilab in 1994 to 
an enthusiastic crowd where hecap- 
tivalcd the audience with his unique 
keyboard style and insightful musical 
comments. Ahmad Jamal takes the 
stage at I : ermllab's Ramsey Auditori- 
um on Saturday, October 2 at 8 p.m. 

Tickcls for Ahmad JamaPs perfor- 
mance arc S22. For further informa- 
tion or telephone reservations, call 
(630) 840-ARTS weekday from 9 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. 




Sk^ 



Fall Diddley craft show returns 
to the Boone County Fairgrounds 

The Mental Health Resource .*v\ RESq ,^ 

League for McHenry County will A ^>^"— ^S 
sponsor the 14th Annual Fall 
Diddley Craft Show at the 
Boone County Fairgrounds in 
Bclvidere. The show will be held pn 
Saturday, Oct. 9, from 10 a.m.— 5 p.m., 
and on Sunday, Oct. 10, from 9 n.m.^i 
p.m. The fairgrounds are located on 
Route 76, just North of Business Route 20 
in Belvidcre. From 1-90, take the Genoa Road 
exit and drive North for approximately five miles. 
Admission is 54 for ages 12 and over. 

Fall Diddley is a juried arts and crafts show with a reputation for 
featuring hand-crafted, original work. Over 350 booths will be shel- 
tered in fairground buildings and tents, On display will be an out- 
standing variety of folk art, wood carving, dried flo- 
^ < rals, pottery, painted and appliqued clothing, jew- 
elry and fine art and much, much more! Hungry 
fairgocrs will find a good selection of food vendors 
and the League's traditional bake sale. Visit the 
information booth to participate in a 50/50 raffle. 

The all-volunteer Menial Health Resource 
League strives to maintain high quality in its an- 
nual craft shows, Fair Diddley In May (on the Wood- 
stock, City Square since 1969) and Fall Diddley in October, All pro- 
ceeds benefit more than 20 agencies concerned with mental health 
services. In 1998, $210,000 was raised for the agencies. 

Grafters from 12 states will sell their goods at Fall Diddley. 
For information for the year 2000, Grafters may write to MHRL, 
P.O. Box 204, McHenry, 60050 or call (815)385-5745. 




Reservations open for Oct. 3 Coalition Tea Party 



The Lake County Women's Coali- 
tion will host its Fifth Annual Tea 
Party at Midlane Country Club in 
Wadsworth on Sunday, Oct. 3. This 
year's event will honor 'Women Au- 
thors,' highlighting the achieve- 
ments of local writers. Scheduled 
speakers, all .women authors from 
the Lake Count)' area, include: 
Eleanor Taylor Bland, mystery 
writer; Paulette Rocskc, poet; Chloe 
Bolan, playwright; and Nancy 
Burgess, historical writer and pho- 
tographer. 

In keeping with the dieme of diis 
year's event, the coalition will be 



accepting donations of new or gen- 
tl y- used children's books die day of 
the celebration. These books will 
then be distributed to various litera- 
cy-related programs and organiza- 
tions throughout Lake County. 

The coalition is comprised of rep- 
resentatives of women's civic, pro- 
fessional and community-oriented 
groups active in Lake County. It was 
established to provide a means of 
recognizing and spotlighting die ef- 
forts and accomplishments of 
women from a variety of back- 
grounds. In previous years, the an- 
nual event has celebrated the 75m 



anniversary of passage of the Nine- 
teenth Amendment, which granted 
women die right to vote; women of 
the Olympics, with former 
Olympians from the 1930's to the 
present in attendance; women In the 
musical arts, highlighting the 
achievements of local women active 
In television, radio and print media. 
Tickets for the Fifth Annual Tea 
Party are $ 1 5 each, and may be pur- 
chased by con tac ting Helen Scott at 
336- 1 795. A percentage of die pro- 
ceeds from the event will be used by 
die coalition for establishment of a 
scholarship fund. 



THEATRE REVIEW 



Exuberant 'Chorus Line' takes 
to Drury Lane stage 



Over the years, "Chorus 
Line" has had an enviable 
record for pleasing audi- 
ences on Broadway and in 
countless traveling and suburban 
productions. With its opening at 
Drury Lane Theater Evergreen Park, 
under the direction of Marc Robin, 
that string of success continues. 

Though some singers in the local 
production lack depth and on open- 
ing night one of the body mikes was 
acting up, the cast compensated 
with spirited, exuberant perfor- 
mances. 

Set In present-day New York, 
"Chorus Line" finds a group of eager 
young men and women competing 
in a tryout for a new musical dance 
show. Based on a book by lames 
Kirkwood and Nicholas Dante, with ■ 
music by Marvin Hamlisch and 
lyrics by Edward Kleban, the play 
cuts to the heart and soul of what it 
means to be a struggling artist hun- 
gry for a job. 

During die course of the 21/4 
hour show (played without intermis- 
sion), we come to know the Inner se- 
crets of what mokes these dancers 
tick, from unhappy childhoods to a 
burning desire to transform them- 



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A scene from "Chorus Line" at Drury Lane theater, Evergreen Park. 



selves into someone else. There's 
even the remnants of an unfinished 
love story between Zach, the chore- 
ographer/stage manager, forcefully 
played by Rudy Hogenmilier, and 
dancer Cassie (Rachel Rockwell), an 
old Ilame now trying to reignite her 
career. 

Other fine work comes from Ar- 
lanc Dolan's zesty performances as 
Sheila, the dancer with an attitude; 
Tammy Mader, whose "Dance; Ten; 
Looks: Three" is a paean to good 
looks as a necessary adjunct to tal- 



ent , and Lara Moffet, whose "What 
I Did for Love" Is stirring and up- 
beat. 

Hogenmilier also adeptly 
handled the choreography (no 
mean Teat, considering the Drury 
Lane's theatcr-ln-the-round for- 
mat), adapting it from the origi- 
nal choreography of Michael 
Bennett. 

"Chorus Line" runs through 
Oct. 16. Ticket InformaUon is avail- 
able at (708) 422-0404.— By Tom 
Witom 




TALK LIVE 
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• Only $.99 per minute 



October 1,1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers I B5 









ark. 
hat 



3 

ury 
or- 

gi- 



i 

vail- 
n 



5 



'Double Jeopardy' Ml of suspense, stupidity 



If you're looking for a suspcnsc- 
ful thriller, you've come to the 
riglit place. 
But If you're looking for a 
smart thriller, look elsewhere. 

Llbby and Nick Parsons {Ashley 
Judd and Bruce Greenwood) live 
what seems to be a perfect life; They 
have a 5-ycar-o!d son, Matty, influ- 
ential friends and impeccable taste 
in art. 

Nick takes Ubby out for a ro- 
mantic sail and is subsequently 
"murdered" while Llbby is asleep. 
When Ubby awakes, Nick's blood is 
everywhere, and she finds a knife, 
the supposed murder weapon, on 
deck. In a daze, she picks up the 



Show/Place 8 

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Rl 4:30. 7:00. 9:30 SAT & SUN 2:00. 



i:30. 



movie review 

■■■■■■■■■■■■MM 




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Korrina Grom : 



gft &\ & 




knife and Is confronted by members 
of the coast guard, 

Soon after, Libby is convicted 
of murder and is sentenced to spend 
an undisclosed amount of time in 
prison. Conveniently, we never see 
much of the (rial. I was left trying to 
figure out how Llbby was convicted 




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THRU THURSDAY, OCT. 7 

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WHERE M0V1E GOING IS FUN AND AffORDABtE 



Tommy Lee Jones and Ashley Judd star in 'Double Jeopardy.' The film features a lot of action and a 
plot that lacks imagination. 



without having any substantial 
proof. The only things the jury has 
to go on are that Libby was the only 
one on the boat with Nick, and she 
was seen holding the knife. 

Meanwhile, family friend Ang- 
le (Annabeth Gish) has agreed to 
take care of Libby' s son. Libby 
makes phone call after phone call 
and Is unable to locate Angie. 
When she finally finds Angle and 
Matty, Libby discovers that Nick is 
alive and well. 

While in prison, a fellow in- 
mate, Margaret (Roma Maffia), in- 
forms Libby that under the Fifth 
Amendment, she cannot be charged 
with the same crime twice. She 
could shoot Nick "in the middle of 
Times Square" and she would face 
no penalty. This situation, which 
lends the movie its title, gives new 
hope to Libby, whose only desires 
are to find her son and reveal her 
"dead" husband. 

Fast forward six years, when . 



Double Jeopardy 

Rated R 

Director 

Bruce Beresford 

Starring 

Tommy Lee Jones 

Ashley Judd 

Bruce Greenwood • 

Annabeth Gish 

Roma Maffia 




•HO PASSU M <*_ 
MOTS FUN , J5J A| 
TKXm 



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Libby Is released from prison to a 
halfway house as part of her parole. 
Travis Lehman (Tommy Lee Jones) 
is libby's strict, "no excuses" parole 
officer, who is prepared to send her 
back to prison after she violates pa- 
role within days of being released 
from prison. 

Jones is, of course, acting out a 
familiar role once again, chasing 
Llbby from location to location a la 
77ie Fugitive. It's a role he does well 
once again. 

The hunt for Nick leads Libby 
and Lehman to New Orleans, where 
the arrogant and intelligent Nick fi- 
nally meets up with his angry and 
vindictive wife. 

Double Jeopardy \s full of sus- 
pense and on-the-edge-of-your- 
seat thrills. But what bothers me is 
that Libby feels the need to track 



down her husband alone instead of 
seeking out assistance from the au- 
thorities. If Nick is indeed alive, - 
what good does it do to want to find 
him and kill him. Wouldn't it be bet- 
ter to expose him for the rat that he 
Is? 

Judd does a great job as the en- 
raged wife, slamming into cars and 
breaking windows with ease. She ef- 
fectively carries this movie, In spite 
of the sometimes-stupid plot. 

Greenwood plays the part of 
Nick well, looking Innocent while 
his life crumbles before his eyes. 

What Double Jeopardy lacked in 
intelligence, especially with Libby's 
prison sentence and parole viola- 
tion, it made up for in action and 
suspense. 

Tor that, I give this movie three 
out of five popcorn boxes. 

Note to readers: 1 also slopped by the 
movie theater this weekend to see 
Jakob the liar, the story of Jews liv- 
ing in a Polish ghetto during the ' 
Holocaust. Robin Williams tones 
down his usual funnyman act and 
gives a great performance as a man 
who overhears a radio broadcast re- 
garding the war and subsequently 
raises the spirits (and lowers the sui- 
cide rate) in the ghetto. I gi ve Jakob 
the Liar two- and-a- half popcorn 
boxes out of five. 



Friday 10/1 through Thursday 10/7 



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CALL FOR MOVIE PRICES 
AND SHOWTIM ES 

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B6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



KIDS KORNER 



1 1 



October 1, 1999 



Animal Match 



Match the animal with its group 
name by drawing a line from the 



^^m 


1. Monkey 




, A. Gaggle 




2. Fish 




B. Tribe 




3. Gorilla 




C. Troop 




4. Goose 




, D. Bed 


nnnW' 


5. Lion 




E. Pack 


H 


6. Goat 




F. School 




7. Wolf 




G. Pride 




8. Oyster 




H. Band 




a '8 3 % L 


Q '9 


9"S V'P H'£ d'Z 3*1 

SJ3MSUV 




THE AUSTRALIAN OPEN, 
FRENCH OPEN, WIMBLEDON 
AND U.S. OPEN ARE THE 
FOUR EVENTS THAT MAKE 
UP THE GRAND SLAM OF 
TENNIS. 



•t' \"> '1* ff 



Can you guess what the bigger 
picture is featured 






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**** 




• THE KNICKERBOCKER 
CLUB, NEW YORK, CODI- 
FIED THE RULES OF BASE- 
BALL 15-1 YEARS AGO. 

•ON JAN. 23, THE U.S. CON- 
GRESS DECREED THE 
FIRST TUESDAY AFTER THE 
FIRST MONDAY OF NO- 
VEMBER TO BE THE UNI- 
VERSAL ELECTION DAY 
FOR PRESIDENTIAL ELEC- 
TIONS. 

• STEPHEN PERRY, AN ENG- 
LISH RUBBER MANUFAC- 
TURER, PATENTED RUB- 
BER BANDS FOR STA- 
TIONERY USE ON MARCH 
17. 






IN WHAT SERIES DID 
BRAD PITT MAKE HIS 
TELEVISION ACTING 
DEBUT? 

ANSWER: "DALLAS" 



How they 
SAY it in.. 



English: 


HOME 


Spanish: 


CASA 


Italian: 


CASA 


French: 


MAISON 


German: 


HEIM 


Latin: 


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• IN THIS YEAR, THE FIRST RECORDED SIGHTING 
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October 1, 1999 



LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B7 






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B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



October 1,1999 



October 1, 1999 



HOT SPOTS 




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SPOTLIGHT: 



Jungle Gym 




Location: 

2068 C Grand Avenue, Lindenhurst, IL 

Telephone: 

(847) 2 65-5000 

Hours: 

5 a.m. - 9 p.m., Monday through Friday; 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. on 

Saturday; and 7 a.m. to noon on Sunday." 



Spirit makes The 
Jungle Gym special 

The Jungle Gym, located at 2068 E. Grand Ave. in 
Lindenhurst, like other health and fitness clubs, is there to 
help clients get and keep their bodies: in the best physical 
shape possible. 

The difference that raises' the Jungle Gym a level above the 
ordinary is our passion for helping people get the results they 
want, says owner Al Roth. 

The Jungle Gym has a staff of professionals that trains 
members on the best machines, such as the Badger Magnum 
Selectorized machines, and StarTrac cardiovascular equip- 
ment, a kick-boxing stage and 4,000 square feet Olympic 
weight room. 

Roth has 15 years of experience as a personal trainer and 
also has been involved for 1 1 years with area youth programs, 
having spearheaded the Vikings Football Program in Antioch, 
for kids from 5 to 14 years. He has used that expertise in 
designing special goal achieving programs for both adults and 
children. 

. Roth and his staff are dedicated to teaching members how 
to get and keep nutritionally healthy and physically fit on their 
own. 

Kick-boxing, aerobics, sports conditioning programs, 
. anaerobic weight training programs, personal training classes 
offering high intensity workouts for all parts of the body, and 
new precision cycling high intensity workout classes, as well 
as Rhinometric classes, are all offered, but the secret is that 
their staff has the passion to give clients the drive they need to 
succeed. 

Kids who want to improve their coordination, agility and 
speed, can join the Rhino Club. Children from 6 through high 
school age, who want a serious workout, can find that chal- 
lenge at The Jungle Gym. 

The talented aerobics instructor, Marcia Mitchell, heads 
the Jungle Room Program, a fun/fitness program for children 
from 4 to 10 years. This is high intensity playing of traditional 
games. Mitchell has the ability to light up a room with her 
glowing personality and definitely raises the energy at the 
jungle Gym, Roth said. 

As part of an anniversary celebration, a one-year member- 
ship is still on sale for $275, with mention of this article, and 
includes one free hour of personal training to learn a program. 

Another outstanding offer Roth includes are two months or 
13 weeks of personal training classes, four per week, j total of 
32 classes, for a mere $250, or $7.81 per class. 

The Jungle Gym's hours are from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., 
Monday through Friday; from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday; 
and from 7 a.m. to noon on Sunday. For more information, 
call (847) 265-5000. 



riB. 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B9 



iMtfj'^Ji'M'Jf'Mi'iK'i'Ji'^ 




77ic Best Chinese Food 

lit Tlte Area... 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 



EREE Delivery 
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Chinese Restaurant 



Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Cany Out • Cocktails 
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111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 



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Adults: $10.95, Seniors: $8.95, Kids under 12: $6.95 



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CASUAL DINING 



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Au-You-Can-Eat, 

Fresh Lake Perch ($11.95) 

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For Reservations Call 
(847) 573-4373 



^M^ fc w * 



rcrm n y in cttijTy; — 

iThe featured speaker is Au- Universities, he was a faculty, 
t Piper, Jr., M.D. He is author member at the University of 



ew ways to manage 
bur cholesterol 



As most Americans are aware, 
l cholesterol levels can led to 
rt problems and can be a signlfi- 
t risk factor for coronary heart 
case. 

What many Americans don't re- 
izes that high cholesterol affects 
00 million people and can be a risk 
en 1ft 



may help promote healthy choles- 
terol levels when used as part of a * 
diet low in saturated fat and choles- 
terol is called Take Control. Take 
Control is from the makers of 
Promise and contains a natural soy 
bean extract that was found in re- 
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ONACO' 

Fine Foods - Cocktails 

2816 Rt 120 • McHonry, II 60050 

(815) 385-5278 ' 





Saturday Night 

16 oz. Steak Dinner s 11 95 



Home of McHenry's 



Dinner 



every Sunday night 
accompanied with music by 

llim 




Join Us For Our Weekend Triple Treat 







FRIDAY 

AH-You-Cari-Eat 

S&\l=O0J)*BUFfEt 

5-IOPM' 



Snow crab • Shell-on (umbo shrimp 

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lemon buttereO sole 

Mussels casmo 

Caiun fried cattish 

Clam strips * Fried shrimp 

Crab cakes 

BBQ cheken * Pasta bar 

Carved roast beel 

Started pork lorn roast 

Ham ana turkey 

Homemade breads and soup 

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Dessert laDio ana more 




AduIU $ 16 M Childrtn"(4.i2) $ 7 
UNDER 4 FREE 




SUNDAY. r, ; > 
OKTOBERflEST BRUNCH 

1;6lAMK2PMi 
Unlimited Champagne 



ENTREES 

• Sour Cream Chicken 

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• Smoked Meals • German Wursts 

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• Potato Pancakes 

• Spaebel • Dumplings 

■ Homemade Byo & Wheat Breodi 

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DEbbERIS 

• German Cakes and lortes 

• And MUCH MUCH MORE 



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P3>161 ; W:Qind Ave,* Curnr^ W; 



viN Centre, Club • 200 W. Golf Rd., Liberitville# 

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AWUAL BCNatPIT 
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icah Pwb & gatery 
Lunches^ Dinners Banquets 
• Steaks •Pastas • Seafood • Chicken 

// oriam cfreahti Jm Jfru Goeru jfriday 



sjctn (JL*Jor^roo{tmll Oundays 

6 Different NFL Games 

Broadcasting Simultaneously 

Football Specials! 



Live bands 

on 
Saturday^ 



Karaoke 

1st & 3rd 

Thursdays, 



Bring in the whole family! 
m.176, Just East of Rt. 12, Wauconda 

(847) 526-0002 



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B 1 / Lakeldnd Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



October 1,1999 



i 









Id 
J 



Come home healthy after traveling abroad 



"Most travelers don't get suf- 
ficient information about diseases 
associated with their destina- 
tions," says Dr. David Sack, pro- 
fessor, Department of Interna- 
tional Health, School of Hygiene 
and Public Health, The Johns 
Hopkins University. "Many expect 
their travel agents to provide such 
information, but this rarely hap- 
pens. If you contact a country's 
embassy or consulate, you ore 
told the legal requirements for en- 
try, but you may not be alerted to 
a disease currently active in that 
area." 

So, what's the solution? "If 
you have a travel clinic in your 
community, call for an appoint- 
ment eight weeks before your de- 
parture. Or, call the CDC hot line 
(1-800-232-2522) for information 
related to your travel plans. Al- 
ways talk to your family physician 
about recommended vaccinations 
for diseases occurring in the 
countries you will visit," Dr. Sack 
advises. 

"Hepatitis A is widespread in 
many parts of the world. More 
% than 24 million Americans travel 
each year to these areas," he says. 
These include Mexico, most parts 
of the Caribbean, most of Asia, 
South and Central America, the 
Mediterranean basin, eastern Eu- 
rope, the Middle East, and Africa. 
"Most people believe that they 
aren't supposed to drink the water 
when traveling to these destina- 
tions to avoid getting traveler's di- 
arrhea. This Is true, but it also may 
prevent hepatitis A and other dis- 
eases transmitted by ingesting 
sewage-contaminated water," 
warns Dr. Sack. Travelers to en- 
demic areas should avoid drinking 
the water tor beverages with ice 
cubes made from local water) and 
eating foods like unpeeled fruits 
and vegetables, which may have 
been washed in contaminated wa- 
ter. Also, avoid seafood, especially 
uncooked shellfish. 

* Hepatitis A is a highly conta-. 
gious virus that infects the liver. Ft 
can survive a month or more on a 
countertop or other surfaces and 
indefinitely in frozen food and ice. 
While many travelers assume that 
the risk of contracting hepatitis A 
is associated with staying in re- 
mote areas, the World Health Or- 
ganization reports that most cases 
occur among travelers who stay in 
resorts and middle- and upper- 
class accommodations. It can be 
prevented through vaccination. 

"On average, individuals who 
contract hepatitis A arc sick for a " 
month, but some experience 
symptoms for up to six months. 
What's more, the older you are, 
the sicker you'll be," Dr. Sack says. 
Children often harbor the dis- 
"ease without overt'symptoms, but 
adults — especially those over 50 
— are at higher risk for severe 
symptoms. Up to 22 percent of 
adults who contract hepatitis A re- 
* quire hospitalization. For adults 
over 40, hospitalization rises to 30 
percent 

Hepatitis A infection in travel- 
ers is the most frequently occur- 
, ; ring vaccine-preventable disease. 
According to the American Jour- 
nal of Tropical Medicine, unpro- 
tected traveler's are 1,000 times 
more likely to get hepatitis A than 
cholera. 
* . "What's alarming is that 
symptoms of hepatitis A, especial- 
ly In children, don't emerge right 
away, so you can bring hepatitis A 
home and spread it before you 
even know you are ill," Dr. Sack 
explains. In fact, hepatitis A is the 
most frequently diagnosed form 
-* of hepatitis brought into devel- 
oped countries like the United 
States, Europe and Japan from 
other parts of the developing- 
world,. 

"In the past, we've given trav- 
elers immune globulin to provide 



short-term protection against he- 
patitis A. Now, there arc vaccines 
for longer-term protection that 
eliminate the need for repeated 
shots for frequent travelers," says 



Dr. Sack. 

"Vaccination against hepatitis 
A is a good idea,'* he recommends. 

"Consult your travel clinic or 
yoilr family physician before you 



go. That way, you have a much 
better chance of coming home 
healthy. And, even if you're not 
leaving the United States, hepati- 
tis A vaccination may he advis- 



able. There arc reports of out- 
breaks in many slates, including 
California, Iowa, Oklahoma, Ore- 
gon, Missouri, Colorado, Ten- 
ncssce*and elsewhere." '. 



t 



1999 HeA 





Mammogram: $20 

All month, by appointment 

A mammogram can help detect breast / 
anything, Our caring and conscientious 
the procedure, answer your questions, 
usually in less than 30 minutes. Results 
ciari; For an appointment, please call S 





carrt 



.outs 



Center 



Free Screening: Blood Pressure C 

All month, by appointment 
Have your blood pressure checked by a healthcare professional at one uf 
the physician offices listed below. Call llie physician closest to you to make 
an appointment. 



NEED A CHANGE OF PACE? 

Give Our Mexican Cuisine A Taste 



MAIN STREET STATIO 

Cantinay Restaurante j 

Located in tho Old CfiNW Troln Dopot 
4005 W. Main Street • McHonry, IL 
(815) 385-4110 ^jftft 

• Delicious Appotizors ■§?*5. A 

• Drink Specials All Week ^Winage ASlnma 

• Lunch & Dinner Specials Mon.-Fri. ,>„... 4:30-6:00 pan. 

ED C C HJI Z& FD? {C- AD J5 controlled and managed for most 

w/purchase of adult entree 
THURSDAY NIGHTS 

(limit 2 margaritas per table) 

Free (IfmciTniiareii > ■ • 



aV\tf> w 



Ithma triggers, why peak (low meter 
ices between your asthma medica- 
Lslhma and to children (along with 
[call to register, 847/872-6209 



Free Class: Image Enhancement Program 

Meets monthly 

Keeling comfortahle with your appearance during and following cancer 
treatment can do a lot to help you feel belter and more self-confident. 
Attend this program which teaches woman and men how to prepare for 
hair loss and other cosmetic changes related to chemotherapy and radia- 
tion. Seating is limited. To register please call 847/872-6062. 

Support Group: Breast Cancer Support Group 

Monday, October 4 7 - 8 p.m. 

A support group for women aiTected by breast cancer. Share experiences, 
explore ideas, and express your feelings among a group of women who 
know what you're going through because they've been there too. For more 
information and lo register, please call 847/872-6062. 



iion Clinic 

Saturday, October 9 9 - 11 a.m. 

Midwestern and the Lake County Health Department team up to provide 
low-cost immunizations for children during a walk-in clinic at the hospi- 
tal. For more information, please call 847/872-6062. 

SALON SPOTLIGHT 

Midwestern Regional Medical Center recognizes that salon professionals 
develop a special rapport with their clients that may be beneficial to edu- 
cating the community uboul cancer prevention. Belt month Midwestern's 
Community' Health Department will select a salon to highlight and conduct 
a presentation on cancer prevention and* detection by a professional 
expert. For more information about how your salon can participate please 
call 847/872-6062. 

Salon 475 : Orthomolecular Dietetics: A Nutritional Approach to 
Balancing Body Chemistry 

Tuesday, October 12 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. 

There are some fascinating nutritional approaches for correcting and pre- 
venting chronic'dlseasc stales! This presentation will help you to decide If 
you might fit into one of five common nutrient imbalance classifications. 
General diet and nutrient recommendations will be discussed. 



At Cancer Resource Center 



Mammogram: $20 . 

Walk-in Wednesday or by appointment 
Every Wednesday, no appointment is needed for a mammogram at the 
Cancer Resource Center. Just visit our Gurnce Mills location between the 
hours of 10:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. and have your mammogram performed 
by a caring and conscientious imaging specialist. The $20 cost includes 
interpretation of your mammogram by a Board-certified radiologist. 
Results will be sent to your physician. Other weekday and weekend 
appointments are also available. For more information, or to schedule an 
appointment, please call 847/856-1220. 

Nutritional Counseling Service 

All month, by appointment 

A registered dietitian who specializes in complementary nutritional thera- 
py is available for in-person or telephone consultation. This a personal- 
ized service for anyone who wants to learn more about the role of nutri- 
tion in disease prevention , treatment or recovery. From cancer prevention 
lo weight control, your individualized, scientifically based program will 
promote optimal health and benefit for die whole family. For details 
regarding our nutritional services, or to schedule an appointment, please 
call 847/856-1220. 

Free Assessment: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment . 

All month 

Let a staff member al Cancer Resource Center help you determine your risk of 
developing breast cancer. Just answer a few short questions and a computer 
generated assessment lool will estimate your breast cancer risk over the next 
five years and during your lifetime. Please note thai this assessment is for infor- 
mation purposes only and should not replace routine mammograms or regular 
cllnicd breast exams. For more information, please call 847/856- 1 220. 

Free Health Talk: Herbal Remedies for Every Age 

Tuesday, October 5, .'. .....7 - 8:30 p.m. 

Herbs can be a powerful ally to people of all ages. Join a healthcare pro- 



fessional who specializes in holistic nutrition for a discussion of the com- 
monly used herbs. Specific dosages and age-specific hcaldi conditions will 
be discussed. Questions from participants are welcome. To reserve a seat 
for this presentation, please call 847/856-1220. 

Free Talk: T'ai Chi Chih! Joy Thru Movement 

Thursday, October 14 i...6:30 - 7:30 p.m. 

T'ai Chi Chih is a simple, casy-to-lcarn, moving meditation form. It can be 
done by anyone regardless of age or physical condition. Widi regular Tal 
Chi Chih practice one may experience improved balance, blood pressure 
control and aid in stress. Donna McIUhosc is a certified T'ai Chi Chih 
instructor. Dress comfortably and bring socks or wear soft soled shoes. 

To register, please call 847/856-1220. 

■ 

Free Screening: Colorectal Cancer Home Test 

Tuesday, October 19 10 a.m. - 12 noon 

Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequendy diagnosed cancers affect- 
ing men and women over age 40. One of the early warning signs, hidden - 
blood in the stool, may be detected by using a simple do-at-home test. Visit 
the Cancer Resource Center during the above hours and receive ydfcr free*- 
kit widi InstrucUons for use. To reserve a colorectal home test, please call 
847/856-1220. 

Free Talk: Smart Supermarket Shopping 

Thursday, October 21 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

Smart food shopping begins before you ever push your shopping cart 
through die aisles. It begins at home, Come and learn some tips diat will 
assist you and your family in.making wise food selections for belter health. 
To reserve your seat, please register by calling 847/856- 1220. 

Free Screening: Blood Pressure 

Saturday, October 23 10 a.m. - 12 noon 

Have your blood pressure checked by a healthcare professional. To regis- 
ter, please call 847/856-1220. 



1 



_._ 



CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER 

Centre Club Pre-Post- 
Natal Exercise Program 

The Centre Club Pre/ Post- 
Natal Exercise Program meets at 
10:30 a.m., Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays at Centre Club. 
200 VV. Golf Rd., Llbertyvlllc. 
Participants may bring babies up 
to six months. For registration 
information, call Centre Club, 
affiliated with Condcll Medical • 
Center at 816-6100. 

Healthy Achievers 

Healthy Achievers is designed 
for adolescents, 13 years or old- 
er, who arc more than 20 per- 
cent over their ideal weight. Of- 
fered by Condell Medical Cen- 
ter's Health Institute and the 
Center for Behavioral Health, 
the program helps families cre- 
ate a healthy environment in 
which both children and adults 
can develop long-term exercise 
and nutrition habits. Classes, 
limited to eight pairs, are held at 
Condcll Medical Center, 801 S. 
Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvillc. An, 
adult must participate with the 
adolescent and periodic family 
*nights will be scheduled. Call 
362-2905, ext. 5770 for informa- 
tion. 

LAKE FOREST 
HOSPITAL • * 

New Orthopedic 
Treatments 

Join orthopedic surgeon, 
Roger Charns, MD, as he dis- 
cusses new treatments for shoul- 
der and knee injuries. Held at 
HFI, 837-735-1200. Date is 
Wednesday, October 13 from 7 
to 8:15 p.m. 

Cholesterol - Getting to 
the Heart of It 

A three-part cholesterol well- 
ness program presented by a 
panel of healthcare profession- 
als: Overview: Cardiologist Jay 
Alexander, MD, explains what 
cholesterol Is and risk factors for 
developing It. Nutrition: Dietit- 
ian Edye Wagner, RD, discusses 
fad diets, as well as how to in- 
clude low fat/low cholesterol 
foods into your diet. Exercise: 
Exercise physiologist Heather 
Tirzmalis, MS, discusses devel- 
oping an exercise program' that's 
right for you. Call 847-234-6112. 
Date: Wednesday, October 20; 
Time: 7 to 9 p.m. 

PR0VENA SAINT 
THERESE MEDICAL 
CENTER 

Brunch with 
Marcia Wallace 

Oct. 23 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 
p.m. at Provena Saint Thcrese 
Medical Center, 2615 Washing- 
ton St., Waukegan. During 
Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 
Provena Saint Therese is proud 
to present Marcia Wallace, a TV 
celebrity whose life was saved 
when her breast cancer was de- 
tected and treated at an early 
stage. In a moving presentation, 
Marcia stresses the importance 
of mammography while sharing 
funny, sad and intimate stories 
about her experience. Marcia is 
best known for her role as recep- 
tionist on "The Bob Newhart 
Show", and Is currently the voice 
of Barts teacher on "The Simp- 
sons." A candid speaker, she 
helps bring home the truth that 
breast cancer can touch any- 
one's life, and that a woman's 
number one weapon in the war 
against the disease is a mammo- 
gram. The program will Include 
a dedication of Provena Saint, 
There's new mammography 
equipment. Cost for the brunch 
and presentation is $50 per per- 
son. Advance reservations arc 
required. Please call Whelma 
Guimdnd at 360-2221 by Oct. 1 1. 



HEALTHWATCH 



i »-« . 



B1 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



October!, 1999 



Illinois False Memory Syndrome annual meeting 
"Reuniting Families: Success, Failure, The Future' 



This program has been orga- 
nized by the Illinois FMS Society, . 
representing over 1000 families in 
Illinois, and will Include lectures 
and pane] discussions by distin- 
guished mental health providers 
regarding reuniting families that 
have been harmed by Recovery 
Memory Therapy. 

The featured speaker is Au- 
gust Piper, Jr., M.D. He is author 



of the recent book, " Hoax and Re- 
ality: The Bizarre World of Multi- 
ple Personality Disorder," whose 
title reveals its theme. Dr. Piper fs 
a Seattle psychiatrist with a dis- 
tinguished career and a member 
of the FMS Foundation Advisory 
Board. A native of the Midwest 
educated at Yale and Howard 
Universities, he was a faculty 
member at the University of 



New ways to manage 
your cholesterol 



As most Americans are aware, 
high cholesterol levels can led to 
heart problems and can be a signifi- 
cant risk factor for coronary heart 
disease. 

What many Americans don't re- 
alizes that high cholesterol affects 
1 00 million people and can be a risk 
even if there is no family history of 
'heart disease. Knowing about cho- 
lesterol and how it can be managed 
is a key to leading a heart-healthy 
life. 

Cholesterol comes from two 
sources: the body and the foods you 
eat. It is a type of fat made mostly 
by the liver and used to manufac- 
ture cell membranes, vitamin D and 
some hormones. The body needs 
cholesterol to function properly, 
but It generally doesn't need any . 
more than the amount the liver 
produces. Dietary and lifestyle 
choices can cause cholesterol to 
rise, but can also be managed by 
making simple changes. 

Reducing your Intake of satu- 
rated fat is one of the most impor- 
tant keys to managing your choles- 
terol. The American Heart Associa- 
tion's Step I Diet, which is designed 
for the treatment of high blood cho- 
lesterol, recommends people limit 
the intake of saturated fat to 8 per- 
cent to 10 percent of total calorics. 
You can do mis by cutting back on 
such foods as red meat, whole milk 
products and butter. 

To reduce cholesterol levels fur- 
ther, new products that contain nu- 
trients such as psyllium, oat fiber 
and natural soybean extract are also 
giving consumers more options. 
For example, one new product that 



may help promote healthy choles- 
terol levels when used as part of a ' 
diet low In saturated fat and choles- 
terol is called Take Control. Take 
Control is from the makers of 
Promise and contains a natural soy- 
bean extract that was found in re- 
cent studies to help lower low-den- 
sity lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cho- 
lesterol levels by an average of 7 
percent to 10 percent, based upon 
one to two servings a day. 

One reason these new products 
are getting so much attention is that 
they allow you to make small, sim- 
ple dietary changes that will have a 
big Impact For example, you can 
simply replace your dally spread or 
margarine with a product such as 
Take Control for spreading on 
bagels and vegetables or melting on 
baked potatoes. 

In addition to modifying the 
intake of saturated fat, the 
American Heart Association rec- 
ommends the following lifestyle 
changes: 

1. Maintain a Healthy Weight. 
Excess body fat not only helps raise 
LDL cholesterol levels, but also total 
blood cholesterol. - 

2. Get Physical. Regular physical 
activity can help raise HDL choles- 
terol levels. 

3. Quit Smoking. Smoking in- 
creases LDL cholesterol levels and 
reduces HDL levels. 

4. Reduce Stress. Learn to take 
time to relax and control your 
stress. 

For more information on how 
to maintain healthy cholesterol lev- 
els, ask your doctor or visit 
www.TakeControI.com. 




Washington for quite a few years 
and has now been in private prac- 
tice for nearly 20 years. In his pri- 
vate practice, Dr. Piper has had 
returnees who have renounced 
Repressed memory Therapy and 
returned to their families. He is 
considered an expert witness in 
many famous cases where the pa- * 
tient has sued the mental health 
provider for below-standard care. 
In addition to his latest book, Dr. 
Piper is the author of more than 
two dozen peer-reviewed profes- 
sional publications, a speaker at 
many professional meetings, and 
a consultant to a number of men- 
tal health organizations. 

The panel of professionals 
who will address the theme of 
"Reuniting Families" fs also a dis- 
tinguished group. 

Dr. Saari has been a long-term 
member of the Social Work 
School of Loyola University in 
Chicago and a therapist in private 
practice for more than 20 years. 
She has contributed widely to the 
professional literature and is edi- 
tor of the "Clinical Social Work 
Journal." She is also a member of 
the FMS Foundation Advisory 
Board. 

Dr. Mary Kay Pribyl has been 
a clinical psychologist in private 
practice for more than 25 years. 
She is also an author of many 



peer-reviewed professional pa- 
pers and an influential member of 
the Illinois Psychological Associa- 
tion. 

Both Dr. Carolyn Saari and Dr. 
Mary Kay Pribyl have been coun- 
seling a number of returnees 
among their patients. 

Dr. Gary Almy is a psychiatrist 
with 26 years of clinical experi- 
ence and has been associated 
with the Illinois FMS Society for 
several years. He is a long-term 
member at Loyola University 
School . of Medicine, Associate 
Chief of Staff at Hines Veterans 
Hospital, and the author of "Ad- 
dicted to Recovery." 

Dr. Larry Kozlcwski Is a clini- 
cal psychologist from Wisconsin 
who has direct family experience 
with an accusing sibling. 
* The program will be hosted by 
Reinder Van Til, Co-President of 
the Illinois FMS Society. His latest 
book Is entitled, "Lost Daughters: 
Recovered Memory Therapy and 
the People It Hurts." 

The meeting will be from 9 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The entrance fee 
is $40 for the first person and $35, 
for each additional family mem- 
ber. Lunch is included. An option- 
al evening dinner is available for 
an additional S21 per person. 

For additional information, 
call 724-6473 or 877-985-7693. 



The American Heart Association 
releases 'Chicago Cooks! Ethnic 
Recipes from the Heart' 



Looking ahead 

On a September 9 visit to Finch University of Health Sciences/ 
The Chicago Medical School, Governor George Ryan met with 
board members and administration during an informal visit to dis- 
cuss the University's future strategic plans. 



Based on the knowledge that 
what We eat can make a differ- 
ence in our health, the American 
Heart Association has developed 
'Chicago Cooks! Ethnic Recipes 
from the Heart'. 

''Chicago Cooks!' was written 
for people who feel strongly that 
our diverse ethnic food heritage 
is a treasure — something to be 
built upon rather than discard- 
ed, iris a recipe book that re- 
tains the joyous aspects of fami- 
ly heritage cooking, while trim- 
ming the excess fat, sodium and 
calories. 

Its 300 pages of contents re- 
flect new knowledge that ex- 
plains changes to our view of 
healthy eating. Bountiful fruits 
and vegetables, whole and en- 
riched grains, herbs, spices, 
small amounts of special oils 
and sweeteners are all foods that 
add flavors; while multi-colored 
legumes and improved low- fat 
fairy and soy foods contribute to 
the variety and delight of the 
recipes. 

Recipes for more than 350 
mouth-watering dishes Include 
everything from German bacon 
onion potato salad, French 
onion soup, Norwegian apple 
pie, Chinese Kung-Pao chicken, 
Mexican tortilla soup, Middle 
Eastern tabbouli and Southern 
cornbread dressing. 

"The cookbook can help con- 
sumers take maximum advan- 
tage of the many fat-fee and low- 
fat foods that are now easy to 
find in the marketplace. This 
widespread availability means 
it's easier than ever before for 
Chicagoans to enjoy their fa- 
vorite ethnic dishes and still fol- 
low a heart-healthy diet," said 
American Heart Association eth- 
nic Cookbook Committee Mem- 
ber ludy Beto, Ph.D., R.D. 



Every recipe that appears In 
'Chicago Cooks!' has been evalu- 
ated and tested by consumers 
and dietitians. In addition, a nu- 
trient analysis is provided for 
each recipe. The cookbook also 
includes the latest information 
on shopping, cooking and stor- 
ing foods — along with a num- 
ber of timesaving tips. 

In addition to being low in 
total fat, saturated fat, choles- 
terol and sodium, most of the 
recipes in this book have been 
modified to decrease total calo- 
ries. Many of the recipes empha- 
size the fruits, vegetables and 
grains that are rich natural 
sources of folic acid and other B 
vitamins. These same foods also 
contain fiber, which may help 
lower blood cholesterol. 

'Chicago Cooks! Ethnic Recipes 
from the Mean' shows Chicagoans 
how to follow a health-building, nu- 
tritionally sound diet without sacri- 
ficing any of the enjoyment of good 
food. 

Now we can treat ourselves 
and our loved ones to delicious 
meals without worrying or feel- 
ing guilty about hidden health 
risks that might be lurking , «r- 

among the goodies," Beto said. 

'Chicago Cooks' Ethnic 
Recipes from the Heart' is $14 
and is available by calling the 
American Heart Association in 
Chicago at 312-346-4675. 

The American Heart Associa- 
tion spent more than $312 mil- 
lion during fiscal year 1997-1998 
for research support, public and 
professional education, and 
community programs. With 
more than 4 million volunteers, 
the AHA is the largest voluntary 
health organization fighting car- 
diovascular diseases and stroke, 
which annually kill more than 
960,000 Americans. 






,: 



• 



B12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



October 1,1999 



S 

; 



Does getting 'beaned' teach kids anything important? 



Dear Dr. Singer, 

Wc have been facing a 
problem that has been grow- 
ing throughout this year and 
last year and wanted to sec 
what your opinion Is on It. 

Our daughter Is In Jr. High 
and has never really been very 
athletic. Wc have found her to 
be more and more phobic 
about going to school based 
on having to attend gym class. 
She cries hysterically and has 
refused to go to school. 

She seems to have two con- 
cerns. First, she Is In a co-ed 
class and the boys tend to 
make fun of her. She has to 
wear a gym uniform and she Is 
little overweight. You can 
guess that the two of those 
things don't go well together. 

Second, she Is terrified of 
certain games they play, 
namely "dodge ball." We have 
tried to explain to her that 
gym Is Just like any other class 
and needs to be attended, but 
we also feel that these two 
things (boys and girls together 
and dodge ball) are very un- 
necessary to the present and 
future well being of the kids. 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Dr. Sherri Singer 



We always believed that Gym 
should be more about teach- 
ing fitness and learning to 
take care of your body, not 
about fear of physical harm 
and criticism. What do you 
think about this? 
Signed, Mother of Daughter 
Dodging Dodgeball. 

Dear Dodge, 

At the risk of every gym 
teacher in the world having a 
problem with my opinion, I have 
to be very honest here. Before 1 
share, I want to say two things. 
First, not all gym classes and 
schools are the same with regard 
to these issues, so don't group. 
Second, I am focusing only on 
dodge ball and the other issues 



you mentioned. There nre many 
positive things that happen In 
many gym classes. All are different. 

Por those of you who arc unfa- 
miliar with dodge hall or bom- 
bardment, I will explain It. There 
would be two teams on two sides 
of the gym spread out against the 
walls. Each team would throw balls 
at the other side to try and hit kids 
on the other team. The object 
seemed to be to dodge the ball so 
you could stay in the game. If you 
got hit, you were supposed to sit 
out. These days, I understand from 
some kids, that some schools have 
gotten a bit more compassionate 
and have started using nerf 
(spongc)-Hkc balls instead of the 
heavy, rubber, bomb-type balls. I 
applaud them, although, I still 
don't understand what significant 
thing this teaches kids. 

To understand the fear, let's 
take a close look at that time in life, 
gym class in general, and what 
many kids really go through. Dur- 
ing pre-adolcscencc, kids arc sen- 
sitive about many things. One 
thing is their bodies. Another is the 
opposite sex. Another Is how well 
they do at things. All of these 
things arc naturally on parade in 




How will your children's future be 
affected if they are not absorbing and 
processing what they should be today? 

WHAT Will THEY MIS f? 

Dr. Singer can help you improve your child's processing skills, focus, 
concentration, motivation, behavior and attitude without using drugs. 

Call today tQ havo your child screened for processing probloms (708) 962-2549 



gym class, including gym uni- 
forms, co-ed gym and competi- 
tion. Who of us can't remember 
being the Inst one picked on the 
team, because you were the only 
one left? Who of us hasn't gotten 
made fun of because something 
on our body wasn't quite in line 
with someone else's opinion. 
Don't get me wrong here, I believe 
that competition Is healthy and 
docs train us for future life experi- 
ences. It also helps us to try hard- 
er, so It's not a negative thing, 
however, if you look closely at 
what goes on in many junior high 
gym classes and talk to (he kids in 
(hose classes, you find it is rarely 
healthy competition. 

In saying these things, I am 
not telling parents or kids to not 
attend gym class, because it Is a 
requirement and like any other re- 
quirement in school, needs to be 
followed. I am writing this more 
for parents and school personnel 
to begin to rc-thlnk what really 
teaches good things in gym class 
and how to determine appropriate 
curriculum. 

If you arc concerned about 
this I would encourage you first to 
make sure that you have all the de- 
tails from your child about what is 
scary or upsetting. 

If your child is truly experienc- 
ing the phobic reaction you are 
describing and this reaction Is tru- 
ly coming from fear of dodge ball 
and other emotional issues 
around gym class, and you would 
like to try to have these things 
changed, the most appropriate 
route, would be to sit down with 
the appropriate school personnel 
(principal, gym teacher, etc.,) and 



talk about what curriculum 
changes might be able to occur. 
Try to be flexible, as flexibility 
tends to promote more positive 
changes than rigidity docs. There 
may not be any changes that can 
be made, but then again, there 
may. 

Be careful, though. If your 
child wants out of gym and sees 
this as the way to get there and 
you go to lengths to help her get 
there, you may successfully help 
her to learn to be an expert manip- 
ulator. This Is why it is so impor- 
tant for you to ask the right ques- 
tions first. You don't want to help 
her learn to get along In life by ma- 
nipulating or complaining. At the 
same time, if it is seriously, emo- 
liunally .affect ing her, you will 
want to help her get through it. 

Talk to your daughter about 
what a great kid she is and all the 
great things she has to offer that 
arc not about sports or weight. 
Help her to make some decisions 
that might make her feel like she is 
doing something to change what 
she wants to about herself. Tell 
your daughter to hang in there. . . 
it docs get belter! Good luck. 

77**5 column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information 
in this column cannot and should 
nat'replace proper Psychological 
treatment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a Li- 
censed Clinical Psychologist, child- 
hood behavior specialist and au- 
thor of the hook, "Wliy kids misbe- 
have! Wfiat every parent needs to 
know to keep their kids on the right 
track!" For an appointment, please 
call (708) 962-2549 or (847) 577- 
8832. 



We've Lowered the Cost 

of a Mammogram to $20! 

Think of What You Could Save. 




At Cancer Resource Center in Gumee Mills, und 
Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern 
Regional Medical Center in Zion, we believe that 
mammograms are so important in the early detection of 
cancer that, in recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness 
Month, wc have lowered die cost to $20 in October. 
I Our board-certified radiologists will interpret your 
mammogram und send the results to your physician. 



If you or someone you love needs a mammogram, please call to schedule an appoint- 
ment at either Midwestern Regional Medical Center or Cancer Resource Center. 
More than saving a few dollars, getting a mammogram could save your life. 



M id wester nw*Ul 

■ ioi own mcmi ct»Mt 
2520 Kllslm Avemiu, Ziuni 1L «K)99 

One of America'* finest hospital*. 
817-731-4100 



9l 

CANCER RESOURCE CENTER 







M/M 



inan 
Guwcc Mill* Malt • EiUranca H 

817-856-1220 






Affiliated icith Cancer Treatment Center* of America. 
www.eancercentor.com > 



Mjnimi.'jlf :ijit>y u.*tv1cci it Mklwetteni nmi tliu Cancer Itetoum) Center 
or* uLffL-ditfil by ihe American College of iLadluluftr. 

•SpdcUl 120.00 prii» vitUl Octohc/ I, P*9? ■ Oct oh: r J I. lt» onl/. 






Focusing on health-related Issues 



■p»— •"-WflL/l 



.Past 

....Present 



zPutute 



Sure to be an informative section. 

Look for it in your Lakeland 

Newspaper on October 22, 1999. 



To advertise in this special section, contact your display 
advertising account executive at 847-223-8161 







October 1, 1999 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers /B1 3 









An education program for care givers of persons 
with Alzheimer's Disease and related dementias 

'Understanding and caring for the person with Alzheimer's' 
Alzheimer's caregivers series-afive session course for caregivers 



All sessions will be held from 7:00 
p.m. till 0:30 p.m. at the Sheridan 
Health Care Center. 

Session 1: Tapping Community 
Resources-Wednesday, October 6. 
When caring for a loved one with 
Alzheimer's Disease or a related de- 
mentia, care givers may begin to feel 
isolated or left out a routine daily 
events. Tills session focuses on op- 
tions and resources available in the 
community and how to use them to 
benefit both die care giver afid their 
loved one. Options discussed will 
include home care, adult day care 
and other forms of respite as well as 
how to choose a nursing home. 

Session 2; Alzheimer's Disease 
and Activities of Daily Living- 
Wednesday, October 13. In this ses- 
sion you will leom how to assist your 
loved one with normal activities of 
daily living like bathing, dressing, 
eating, and toileting. Issues involv- 
ing safety, mobility and self medica- 
tion will be highlighted. Creative . 
techniques utilizing the person's re- 
maining abilities and strengths will 
be shared. These can ease the strain 
that often accompanies these issues 
and allow more effective, efliclent 
and safe care giving. 

Session 3: Taking Care of Your- 
self and Other Family Members- 
Wednesday, October 20. Caring for 
a loved one with Alzheimer's Dis- 
ease is not only.physically challeng- . 
ing, but can strain emotions within 
the family structure. In this final ses- 
sion, care givers will be given sugges. 
tions on how to set realistic goals 
and expectations for themselves, 
cope with the changes in their lives, 
' " and how to respond to the various 
reactions that are common among 
family members and friends. 

Expert Speakers 

Maria Becker, Administrator, 
Sheridan Health Care Center, started 
at Sheridan as a staff nurse 16 years 
ago and has been the Administrator 
for the past 6 years. 

Marge Burda, B.S., Gerontoto- 
gist, has coordinated social services 
at the Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Senior 
Center for 14 years. She is member- 



ship chairperson of the Senior Ser- 
vice Coalition of Lake County, a 
member of the Lake Forest Hospital 
Home-Health Advisory Board, and 
coordinates the "Relief for Care 
Givers" program, a community- 
based volunteer respite program for 
family care givers. 

Emogene Davis, a veteran care 
giver, who is sensitive to her own 
needs along with the needs of family 
members who have Alzheimer's Dis- 
ease. She is creative in finding ways 
to extend caring relationships, have 
fun, develop new relationships, and 
maximize the quality of life for her- 
self and those around her. 

George Demos, R.Ph., FASCP, 
Lawrence-Weber Medical, An Omni- 
care Company, is a consultant phar- 
macist in long term care with over 25 
years of experience. He works with ' 
special care units in geriatric facili- 
ties and serves on several psy- 
chotropic and interdisciplinary 
teams. He was an investigator in 
post-marketing surveillanceof 
tacrine (Cognex) and the first ap- 
proved drug In the treatment of 
Alzheimer's disease. 

Murray Gordon, President, 
MAGA Limited, an independent in- 
surance company specializing in in- 
dividual and group Long-Term Care 
Insurance. He founded MAGA in 
1975 recognizing the need for pro- 
tection against spiraling nursing 
home and home care costs. MAGA 
is affiliated with Life Services Net- 
work of Illinois, the Illinois Associa- 
tion of Realtors, Community 
Bankers Association of Illinois, the 
Illinois Association of School Admin- 
istrators and The Illinois Principals' 
Association. Mr. Gordon and MAGA 
have been involved with a great 
many conferences on health, aging 
and Alzheimer's Disease. 

Brenda Grant, Activity Director, 
Sheridan Health Care Center, has 
worked closely with different popu- 
lations such as the geriatric resident, 
those with MI, and the 
Alzheimer's/Dementia resident for 
the past 7 years. Previously she 
worked as a Special Care Unit Coor- 
dinator on an Alzheimer's/Demen- 



UNDERSTANDING & CARING 
FOR THE PERSON WITH ALZHEIMER'S 

Al/lu'tiiKT s ( arc divers Ncticn 
A Mx ScvaiM ( nurse tor l.umlv ( jn - divers 



SEMINAR LOCATION: Sheridan Health Care Center 
SEMINAR TIME: 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m, 

SEMINAR TOPICS: 



Session 1 Alzheimer 's Disease: Ulni Trends 
In Research and Trraunents 
PrniousJy Taken Place 

Session 2 Helping ihc Person uiih 
Alzheimer's Disease Cope 
Wednesday, September 22, 1999 

Session 3 Legal and Financial Implications 
in Alzheimer's Disease • 
Wednesday, September 29. 1999 



EXPERT SPEAKERS: ' 

•Mxti kder, .Uoiiirtntof. Smdu HnlA Cm Ceiler 
•LaeftK Ditis, i trima our ff«cr 
•Mwnj CoriM, rmlinl, M.IU Uailrd 
• U nil Crat, Arjnrj Dimta. Jkridi* Hal4 Cwt Crikr 
•Uiahrtk 1 Kailcr, M.D., .S« rolopu 
•&iru lotwrtt, IA , ISX, MIA, MX 
•Kmj Idkr, Wrrcujf U .tdalulott. Wridu Italtk On 
Colo 



Session 4 Tapping Community Resources 
VTednesdaV October 6, 1999 



Session 5 Alzheimer's Disease and Aamlies 
of Daily LMng 
Wednesday, October 13, 1999 

Session 6 Taking Care of Yourself and Other 
Family Members 
Wednesday, October 20. 1999 



•Hwf* hnU. IS, Cnwtalocbt 

•Ccortt Dcboi. «JV, r.UCr, Uwiwct-Wdw MctSiol. 

•Otj (If It™. OfU, Dimtof of AUkiacrt Care, 

TkfnlvURo(UM)Uiiiit 
• Kile 5<rift, I Pi, CoimI'uiI rVim*i>L 

Utrracr-f (W Medial. Ai OaaJort Co*p*f 



To Register, Call: 




Sheridan Health Core Center 

2534 Ellm Avenue, Won, Illinois 60099 

phone 847-746-8435 fa* 847-746-1744 




A SUlkd Ore vui RthihtliuiiiKi \ m. ilr> 



AFFORDABLE QUALITY ALZHEIMER'S CARe| 



tin Unit. 

Elizabeth S.Kesslcr, MR, Neu- 
rologist, and Medical Director for 
thcMemory Assessment Progranm 
at Highland Park Hospital, hse is As- 
sociate Professor of Clinical Neurol- 
ogy & Associate Professor of Clinical 
Psychiatry at the Chicago Medical 
School. 

Sharon Roberts, R.N., B.S.N., 
N.H A, MA, a nurse, nursing home 
administer and geronotoiogidst with 
a long standing Interest in demetia 
care, she has cared for people with 
alzheimer's disease, consulted to 
nursing homes on their bchlf, been 
invloved in research about feeding 
and bathing behaviors, taought staff 
and family care givers, and facilitat- 
ed care giver and Early Stage support 
groups. Sharon is the immediate 
Past-President of the Greater 
Chicagoland Alzheimers Associa- 
tion. 

Kate Swift. R.P.h, Consultant 
Pharmacist, Lawrence-Weber Med- 
ical, An Omnicare Company, is a 
member of the American Society of 
Consultant Pharmacists and has 
over 8 years of experience working 
with Alzheimer's patients In a spe- 
cial care unit 

Ross Zeller, Director of Admis- 
sions, Sheridan Health Care Center, 
has also served as Director, of Social 
Services in his 5 years there. He has 
served three Lutheran churches as 
pastor for 16 years. 

To register to attend this free ed- 
ucation program or for more infor- 
mation, please call Ross Zeller at 
Sheridan Haelth Care Center at 746- 
8435. 



What to do about poor 
air quality in schools 



'..sr ,- 



Most people know that out- 
door air pollution can damage 
their health, but many do not 
know that indoor air pollution 
can be just as dangerous. 

According to the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency, in- 
door levels of pollutants may be 
two to five times — and occa- 
sionally more than 100 times — 
higher than outdoor levels. 

While pool Indoor air quality 
(IAQ) Is a threat to all humans, 
school children are especially 
vulnerable. Compared to previ- '- 
ous generations, American kids 
spend a lot of their time indoors, 
especially during the school day, 
where asthma-triggering dust 
mites and allergens are most 
common. Poor IAQ may lead to 
headaches, sore throats, sleepi- 
ness, lethargy and dizziness. 

Asthma is the No. I chronic 
condition causing children to be 
absent from school, according to 
the American Lung Association. 
On average, an asthmatic child 
misses a week of school each 
year due to the illness. 

Because asthma is on the 
rise, air quality in schools is of 
particular cone? rn. Good indoor 
air quality contributes to a favor- 
able learning environment for 
students, productivity for teach- 
ers and staff, and a sense of 
comfort, health and well-being 
for al school occupants. 

Parents are not powerless in 
correcting the situation. There 
are steps they can take to ensure 
good air quality In their chil- 
dren's schools. 

If your child, or someone 



else you know, is experiencing 
symptoms that you believe may 
be related to their school envi- 
ronment, Consumer Federation 
of American Foundation recom- 
mends that you contact school 
officials immediately and en- 
courage them to obtain and use 
EPA's Indoor Air Quality Tools 
for Schools action kit. 

The kit shows schools how to 
carry out a practical plan of ac- 
tion to improve their IAQ at lit- 
tle or no cost using common ,,, 
sense activities and in-house 
staff. "Once you understand 
the basics that influence in- 
door air quality In a school, you 
will note that prevention and 
problem solving mainly involve 
two major actions — the man- 
agement of pollutant sources 
and the use of ventilation to 
control pollutants," EPA says in 
a fact sheet. 

But what can you do to im- 
prove IAQ? Here are a Tew simple 
suggestions from the CFAF: 

•Replace dirty air filters ac- 
cording to a schedule. 

•Move books and equipment 
away from ventilators. 

•Avoid the use of scented 
cleaners or air fresheners to 
mask odor. 

•Use nontoxic air supplies 
and cleaning products.. 

•To order EPA's action kit, ** ; 
call the U.S. Government Print- 
ing Office at (202) 512-1800, or 
click oh 

www.epa,gov/iaq/schools/sc- 
faqs.html. The kit is available 
free to schools by calling 1-800- 
438-4318. 



pi •»'-- 



* 



\ Flu Shot: 




ANTIOCH 

OSCO DRUG 

968 Route 59 

FRI OCT 1.2pm- 8pm 

WED OCT 6. earn, 2pm 

PfGGLY WIGGLY 

460 Orchard SL 

FBI OCT 15. 10am-2pm 

VFW 

75 North Ave. 
FRIOCTl5.4pm.7pm 

VHA 01 LAKE COUNTY 

372 E. North Ave. 

SUN OCT 17. 10am-2pm 



GURNEE 

• 
JEWEL-OSCO ~ 
6507 Grand Ave. 
WED OCT 6. 8am. 6pm 

SAMS CLUB 

6570 Grand Ave. 

SAT OCT 9. 10am-2pm 

LIBERTYVILLE 

JEWEL-OSCO 
1300S. Milwaukee 
FRI OCT 8. 2pm-8pm 
SAT OCT 23. 10am-2pm 



LINDENHURST 

EAGLE FOODS 

1500 Grand Ave. 
WED NOV 3. 9am-lpm 

MUNDELEIN 

OSCO DRUG 

1501 S.Lake St 

SAT OCT 2. 10am-2pm 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 



JEWEL-OSCO 

900 E RotlinsRd. 

SAT OCT 16. 10am-2pm 



MO 

Medicare Part B Accepted 

Don't Procrastinate, Vaccinate! 

AAA 



Visiting Nurse Community Care, Inc. 

VNA ol Lake County 
FLU HOTLINE 414-656-8412 Ext. .207 



B14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FALL HOME & GARDEN 



October 1,1999 l_ 






L< • 



■%f 




■• 



., *'.',.• — 



. . - 





4 



FALL 

99 



wwftfatf t*ar.£« 



Explore the interior design 




of a log home 



When you think of n log home, do you as- 
sume thiii means the interior walls will also 
leave the togs visible? 

It doesn't have to be that way. 

While traditional log home building 
methods stack logs one a top the other, pro- 
ducing the log look both inside and out, there 
is a way to get that look outside and a more 
traditional appearance for walls inside your 
home. 

The Thermal- lx)g Building System used 
by Wisconsin Log and Cedar Homes gives the 
homeowner great flexibility in designing the 
interior appearance. 

A Wisconsin Log and Cedar Homes 
method combines traditional 2" by 6" wood 
framing with exterior sheathing and Tyvck 
house wrap, topped with the half-log exterior 
to give the home the rustic, rugged look of a 
log home on the outside. 

Meanwhile, the inside can be finished 
with the more traditional sheet rock or dry- 
wall, with half-logs or a combination of the 
two. 

Donna Johnson, who recently built a Wis- 
consin Log Home, says she opted for the dry- 
wall interiors in much of the home because of 
the ability to have sheet rock walls which can 
be painted or wallpapered. 

"I like color so I wanted to be able to dec- 
orate the interior," she says. 
Donna chos6 a mix of warm, earth-tone 
painted walls and elegant wallcoverings to 
give the interior of the home the warm, rich 
feeling she wanted, while keeping the rustic 
exterior look of a log home. 

The Thermal Log system also allows for 
other interior finishes. For example, Donna 
opted to have beadboard paneling on (he 
.ceiling of the home's master bedroom, while 
squared-off beams criss-cross the living room 
and country kitchen. 

But from the outside, Donna says, "This is 
what a home in the mountains should look 
like; it has that rustic look that blends in with 
the mountains and the lake, hut inside I could 



do the kind of decorating I wanted to do." 

The added advantage ofWisconsin Log 
Homes' system is that the traditional framing 
permits the inclusion of in-wall insulation, 
while eliminating the problems which typi- 
cally plague log homes — the shifting and 
shrinking of the logs at varying rates, which 
leads to cracks between logs and around win- 
dows and doors. It also eliminates the need 
for frequent chinking between the logs to 
overcome the shrinkage. And, the combina- 
tion of framing, insulation and half- log exteri- 
or produces an R-36 or better insulation val- 
ue, compared to an R-15 for 10" whole log 
walls or a 2-by-'l framed house. That means 
big savings on energy costs. 

Greg Diederich, general manager of Wis- 
consin Log and Cedar Homes, notes the Ther- 
mal-Log system eliminates drafts that can 
overcome the efficiency of a modern heating 
system. 

"The higher R- value results from the 
combination of insulation and thermal mass, 
something you can't get with full log walls or 
the 2-by-4 framing," he said. 

The energy-saving features ofiheTlier- 
mal Log Building System have earned the En- 
erg)' Star Home endorsement from the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency. 

Wisconsin Log Homes' conventional 
framed construction also makes it far easier 
to run mechanicals - electrical, plumbing and 
heating - wherever you need them in the 
house. With full log non-conventional con- 
struction, standard installation methods used 
by your mechanical contractor will be far 
more costly and they may be visible on the 
surface of interior walls, neither of which is a 
very attractive alternative. 

All of that's important, of course, but 
Donna Johnson says simply, "I like what my 
house looks like, inside and out. I don't think 
I could say that with a traditional log home." 
Courtesy of Article Resource Association, 
www.aracopy.com, e-mail: 
Info@aracopy.com. 




Foot Care 
Specialist 



BOARD CERTIFIED* 



FOOT FACTS 

From The Foot Doctor 

DR. GRIFF J. WINTERS & ASSOC. 

Specializing in ReconsfrucfiVe Foot & AnWe Surgery 

INGROWN NAILS are part of a painful, often infected condition that usually 

occurs tithe big toe nail. Ingrown nails can be permanently corrected with an 

office procedure. This allows normal shoe wear and no time off work. 

If you have the above symptoms or any other foot discomfort, you may contact 

Dr. Winters for a NO COST CONSULTATION to sea if there may be an answer 

to vour foot pain. 

'By the American Board of Podlatrlc Surgery 



When you think of a log home, do you assume that means- the interior walls will 
also leave the logs visible? It doesnt have to be that way. 

Create a mood or capture a memory with candles 



770 Barron Blvd. 
(Rto. 83) 



223-4000 



Grayslake 



As warm, summer breezes turn to brisk 
winds, thoughts of warm apple pie, crisp au- 
tumn leaves, glowing pumpkins and festive hol- 
iday celebrations with family and friends come 
to mind. Candles are an easy and beautiful way 
to capture the aromas and sensations of the au- 
tumn season and bring them into your home. 

Yankee Candle Company, a leading manu- 
facturer, retailer, and wholesaler of scented can- 
dles, suggests the following list of seasonal can- 
dle scents for gift giving, home fragrancing, and 
home decorating. 

- Recreate the scents of the season without 
mixing or kneading - their Warm Apple Crisp, 
Macintosh or Spiced Pumpkin candies evoke fa- 
vorite scents of the holidays. Arrange on the 
mantle or in front of a mirror to make any room 
sparkle. 

-This Halloween, surprise your favorite 
trickster with the ultimate treat! Fill a plas- 
tic pumpkin with their favorite candies and 
fun candles with a holiday theme. For Hal- 
loween, Yankee Candle has created Witch- 
es Brew and Trick or Treat Sampler Candles. 
Leave on the doorstep with a note from 
yours ghoul-y • a devilish delight for the 



- Bring autumns colors indoors and create a 
bountiful Thanksgiving table — arrange their 
Harvest, Cranberry and Spiced Pear candles of 
differing heights along the center of your table. 
Involve the kids: have them gather colorful au- 
tumn leaves and together you can place them 
among the candles for a truly festive look! Re- 
member to use quality candleholders, keep 
leaves a safe distance from burning candles and 
never leave lit candles unattended. 

- ThisThanksgiving, bring the gracious host- 
ess the perfect gift of a special scented candle - 
Yankee Candle offers a delicious Banana Nut 
Bread candle. Pair it with a baking pan-add a col- 
orful potholder to complete this scrumptious 
ensemble! 

-Ward off the cold and create a cozy escape 
in your own home- Place Cinnamon Toast, 
Hazelnut Coffee and French Vanilla pillar can- 
dles in the fireplace for a delicious glowing effect 

• Holiday house guests will be charmed by 
the little keepsakes left on their bedside tables . . 
. Vineyard, Buttercrcam or Home Sweet Home 
candles in adorable 3.7 oz. Housewarmer jar 
sizes. Add an unusual twist by including a book 
of matches from your own favorite vacation re- 
treat 



With Our Fall Furnace Clean & Chec 
[You'll Be Prepared For The Cold Wea 

Season 

Call Today To Schedule 

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parts extra • 

larbon Monoxide Check Available At Extra Charge. 
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young-at-heart! 



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Is Your 



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Grayslake. 
223-8877 

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Grayslake 
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i— V 




Ready' T« WHHHH 

Now is the perfect time to do your "home work," j 

with the help of our handy fall home improvement 

edition. Available in next week's 

Lakeland Newspapers. 



Fantastic savings for your 
Home & Garden. Plus a chafice 
to win gift certificates from the 
following advertisers: 






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October 1,1999 



FALL HOME & GARDEN 



Lakeland Newspapers I B 1 5 



Fall fertilization: research proves the grass is greener in spring 



For decades, golf course superintendents 
in the snow belt have applied natural organic 
fertilizers in late fall or prior to a permanent 
snow cover for earlier spring green-up and 
root development. Homeowners In the north 
can apply this same practice - known as dor- . 
mant fertilization • to their yards for a vibrant 
spring lawn. 

Recent research indicates that a dormant 
application of an organic fertilizer such as 
Milorganite not only causes turfgrass to 
green-up a week or two earlier in spring, but 
also helps maintain good turf color and 
growth rales through mid-May. In fact, some 
industry experts consider fall the most impor- 
tant season for lawn fertilization. 

The research - conducted by Dr. Wayne 
Kussow, a leading turf specialist at the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin-Madison - also Indicates 
that turfgrass with dormant-applied Milor- 
ganite recovers from winter damage more 
rapidly and better handles heavy foot traffic, 
"Homeowners can benefit from the same , 
practices of turf maintenance professionals," 
said Alan Necs, director of marketing for 
Milorganite Division-M MSD in Milwaukee. 

""fiicy can use Milorganite on lawns, trees, 
shrubs, flowers and vegetables - just about 
anything that grows in soil. And dormant fer- 
tilization will give homeowners a head start 
on their spring lawns." 

In the University ofWIsconsIn-Madison 
study, test plots with dormant-applied Milor- 
ganite displayed significantly darker green 
spring color than those without dormant ap- 
plications. Research results contradict the 
commonly held belief that nitrogen can't be 
released when soil temperatures drop below 
50 degrees Fahrenheit. Nitrogen is the prima- 
ry clement responsible for early turfgrass 
green-up. 
Speaking from Experience 

No one can attest to the advantages of 
dormant-applied Milorganite more than a 
golf course superintendent. 

Mark Kuhns, superintendent for Oak- 
mont Country Club, Pittsburgh, has used 
Milorganite for dormant feeding since 1979. 
"We came out of that winter, and I was in 



awe," recalled Kuhns, "Since then, I've been a 
firm believer In Milorganite." 

A resilient turf Is probably the biggest ad- 
vantage to dormant-applied Milorganite, ac- 
cording to Kuhns. "It really gives turfgrass a vi- 
brant look In the spring," said the Pennsylva- 
nia-based superintendent. 'Milorganite is 
able to sustain the turf throughout the severe 
winter months, especially 'January and Febru- 
ary." 

Steve Bailey, superintendent for Brown 
Deer Pork Golf Course, Milwaukee, also can 
attest to the advantages of dormant-applied 
Milorganite. "It gives the grass an excellent 
start for the new golf season," he said, noting 
that he applies the fertilizer to a variety of ar- 
eas, including fairways, greens and roughs. 

Bailey has used Milorganite for nearly 30 
years. Above all, he said he prefers Its slow-re- 
lease, non -burning formula. There's a high 
bum potential for fast-release fertilizers," he 
explained. 
Getting the Most from Milorganite 

Indeed, Kussow' s research proves what 
golf course superintendents have known for 
decades - that dormant-applied Milorganite 
improves turf quality. Homeowners also can 
lake advantage of dormant-applied Milorgan- 
ite for a resilient green lawn. 

For best results, homeowners with cool- 
season, northern grasses (e.g., Kentucky blue- 
grass, fescues and ryegrass) should apply one 
40-pound bag of Milorganite per 2,500 square 
feet of lawn In fall (after the last mowing or 
prior to a permanent show cover), late spring 
(mid-to-late May) and late summer (late Au- 
gust to early September). Milorganite doesn't 
need to be watered-In, but watering will expe- 
dite its benefits. Milorganite's slow-release 
formula provides steady, uniform growth 
without scorching or striping lawns. 
Milorganite can be easily applied to lawns 
with any drop- or rotary-spreader, informa- 
tion for calibrating common spreaders Is 
available on Milorganite bags. 

For more Information about Milorganite, 
or to receive Information about its many uses, 
call 1-800-304-6204 or visit www.milorgan- 
itc.org. 



TORO 



Fall 

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GRAYSLAKE LAWN & FEED 
SALES, INC. 

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847-223-6333 








up 



For decades, golf course superintendents fn the snow belt have applied natural or- 
ganic fertilizers in late fall or prior to a permanent snow cover for earlier spring 
green-up and root development Homeowners in the north can apply this same 
practice. 

Flames without the fuss 



Are you aware that you can install a fire- 
place In your home for about the cost of a 
three-day vacation? That you can rum iron 
and off with, the flick of a switch? That there's 
no wood to lug, no mess to clean? -That it will 
heat not only the room it's In, but more? And 
that you can fuel that fireplace with gas, either 
natural or propane, which means technology 
is available to you, no matter where you live? 

Gas hearth products have taken over the 
market from other fuels, much like gas grills 
are taking over from charcoal, why? Conve- 
nience. Pure and simple, convenience. 

The squeeze of time imposed by job and 
family, home chores and recreation, has 
boosted sales of products that reduce the time 
required by their predecessors. A gas grill pro- 
duces instant flames, eliminating the time re- 
quired to light charcoal and wait until it turns 
gray. Perhaps 1 5 to 20 minutes saved? At the 
push of a button your hearth roars to life, pro- 
viding instant heat and ambiance, and elimi- 
nating the gathering of kindling, paper and 
wood, and the time required to produce a 
roaring blaze. Twenty minutes saved? 



While 20 minutes may not seem like 
much, it's enough to guarantee that owners of 
gas hearths and gas grills will use their units 
much more frequently than those with wood 
or charcoal. 

Gas stoves and fireplaces are available in 
variety of Btu ranges, with fully adjustable 
controls. Flame technology is such that it's 
becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish 
a gas from wood fire. And if you haven't ex- 
plored the possibilities, you'll find installation 
a relative snap. - 

Direct-vent technology eliminates the 
heed for a chimney or major remodeling. 
These units vent directly through the wall, 
much like your clothes dryer. In addition, di- 
rect-vent hearth products take their combus- 
tion air from outside, and vent combustion 
by-products directly outdoors, this method is 
both safer and healthier. 

For more information on gas hearth ap- 
pliances, as well as other hearth products, a 
free copy of the 86- pa ge Hearthwarming: A 
Guide to Hearth Products is available by call- 
ing 1-800-835-4323. 



Knowledgeable, Friendly Staff 



». *• / 



tfl 




Mill 

Creek 
Nursery 









re'-. 



""18 now! 



v, i A 



-•-tV.V~-V 






Jumbo Stae Mums 
SS.M/e** 






40960 Mill Creek Rd. Wadsworth 

(847) 838-0501 

FALL HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 7 am - 5 pin; Sun. 10 am - 3 pm 

Directions to Mill Creek Nursery: II North to Ute. 173 {Kosecrans) 
West to (1st intersection) Mill Creek ltd., Left on gravel roud 1/2 mile to Nursery Sign. 



_u_ Mtryv"u*~ '*» • -t ~ * — * — 



• **■ * ' 



B14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FALL HOME & GARDEN 



October 1, 1999 



' 



||; 

i 

"i 









'%/ 





FALL 

99 



4 



m&ss 



Explore the interior design possibilities of a log home 



When you think of a Jog home, do you as- 
sume that means the interior walls will also 
leave the logs visible? 

It doesn't have to be that way. 

While traditional log home building 
methods stack logs one a top the other, pro- 
ducing the log look both inside and out, there 
is a way to get that look outside and a more 
traditional appearance for walls inside your 
home. 

The Thermal-Log Building System used 
by Wisconsin Log and Cedar Homes gives the 
homeowner great flexibility in designing the 
interior appearance. 

A Wisconsin Log and Cedar Homes 
method combines traditional 2" by 6" wood 
framing with exterior sheathing and Tyvek 
house wrap, topped with the half-log exterior 
to give the home the rustic, rugged look of a 
log home on the outside. 

Meanwhile, the inside can be finished 
with the more traditional sheet rock or dry- 
wall, with half-logs or a combination of the 
two. 

Donna Johnson, who recently built a Wis- 
consin Ix>g Home, says she opted for the dry- 
wall interiors in much of the home because of 
the ability to have sheet rock walls which can 
be painted or wallpapered. 

"I like color so I wanted to be able to dec- 
orate the interior," she says. 
Donna chose a mix of warm, earth- lone 
painted walls and elegant wallcoverings to 
give the interior of the home the warm, rich 
feeling she wanted, while keeping the rustic 
exterior look of a log home. 

The Thermal Log system also allows for 
other interior finishes. For example, Donna 
opted to have headboard paneling on the 
.ceiling of the home's master bedroom, while 
squared- off beams criss-cross the living room 
and country kitchen. 

But from the outside, Donna says, "This is 
what a home in the mountains should look 
like; it has that rustic look that blends in with 
the mountains and the lake, but inside 1 could 



do the kind of decorating I wanted to do." 

The added advantage of Wisconsin Log 
Homes' system is ihm the traditional framing 
permits the Inclusion of in-wall insulation, 
while eliminating the problems which typi- 
cally plague log homes — the shifting and 
shrinking of the logs at varying rates, which 
leads to cracks between logs and around win- 
dows and doors. It also eliminates the need 
for frequent chinking between the logs to 
overcome the shrinkage. And, the combina- 
tion of framing, insulation and half-log exteri- 
or produces an R-36 or better insulation val- 
ue, compared to an R-15 for 10" whole log 
walls or a 2-by-'l framed house. That means 
big savings on energy costs. 

Greg Diederich, general manager of Wis- 
consin Log and Cedar Homes, notes the Ther- 
mal-Log system eliminates drafts that can 
overcome the efficiency of a modern heating 
system, 

"The higher R-value results from the 
combination of insulation and thermal mass, 
something you can't get with full log walls or 
the 2-by-4 framing," he said. • 

The energy-saving features of the Ther- 
mal Log Building System have earned the En- 
ergy Star Home endorsement from the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency. 

Wisconsin Log Homes' conventional 
framed construction also makes it far easier 
to run mechanicals - electrical, plumbing and 
healing - wherever you need mem in the 
house. With full log non-conventional con- 
struction, standard installation methods used 
by your mechanical contractor will be far 
more costly and they may be visible on the 
surface of interior walls, neither of which is a 
very attractive alternative. 

All of that's important, of course, but 
Donna Johnson says simply, "I like what my 
house looks like, inside and out. I don't think 
I could say that with a traditional log home." 
Courtesy of Article Resource Association, 
www.aracopy.com, e-mail: 
Info@aracopy.com. 



IfeSHS 



Foot Care 
Specialist 



BOARD CERTIFIED* 



FOOT FACTS 

From The Foot Doctor 
DR. GRIFF J. WINTERS & ASSOC. 

Specializing in Reconstructive Foot & AnhJe Surgery 

INGROWN NAILS are part of a painful, often infected condition that usually 

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Grayslake 



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When you think of a log home, do you assume that means the Interior walls will 
also leave the logs visible? It doesn't have to be that way. 

. ■•■ 

Create a mood or capture a memory with candles 



As warm, summer breezes turn to brisk 
winds, thoughts of warm apple pie, crisp au- 
tumn leaves, glowing pumpkins and festive hol- 
iday celebrations with family and friends come 
to mind. Gindles are an easy and beautiful way 
to capture the aromas and sensations of the au- 
tumn season and bring them into your home. 

Yankee Candle Company, a leading manu- 
facturer, retailer, and wholesaler of scented can- 
dles, suggests the following list of seasonal can- 
dle scents for gift giving, home fragrancing, and 
home decorating. 

• Recreate the scents of the season without 
mixing or kneading - their Warm Apple Crisp, 
Macintosh o r Spiced Pumpkin candles evoke fa- 
vorite scents of the holidays. Arrange on the 
mantle or in front of a mirror to make any room 
sparkle, 

- This Halloween, surprise your favorite 
trickster with the ultimate treat! Fill a plas- 
tic pumpkin with their favorite candies and 
fun candles with a holiday theme. For Hal- 
loween, Yankee Candle has created Witch- 
es Brew and Trick or Treat Sampler Candles. 
Leave on the doorstep with a note from 
yours ghoul-y - a devilish delight for the 
young-at-heart! 



- Bring autumns colors indoors and create a 
bountiful Thanksgiving table — arrange their 
Harvest, Cranberry and Spiced Pear candles of 
differing heights along the center of your table. 
Involve the kids: have (hem gather colorful au- 
tumn leaves and together you can place them 
among the candies for a truly festive look! Re- 
member to use quality condleholders, keep 
leaves a safe distance from burning candles and 
never leave lit candles unattended. 

-ThlsThanksgiving, bring the gracious host- 
ess the perfect gift of a special scented candle - 
Yankee Candle offers a delicious Banana Nut 
Bread candle. Pair it with a baking pan-add a col- 
orful potholdcr to complete this scrumptious 
ensemble! 

- Ward off the cold and create a cozy escape 
In your own home- Place Cinnamon Toast, 
Hazelnut Coffee and French Vanilla pillar can- 
dles In the fireplace for a delicious glowing effect 

- Holiday house guests will be charmed by 
the li tile keepsakes left on their bedside tables . . 
.Vineyard, Buttcrcrcam or Home Sweet Home 
candles in adorable 3.7 oz. Housewarmer jar 
sizes. Add an unusual twist by including a book 
of matches from your own favorite vacation re- 
treat. 




i* 1 ! 






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■£Uill£Hi!UM!;HiUi$|j 



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wm/BhKE REAbf wemam 

gy \W Now is the perfect time to do your "home work," j 

with the help of our handy fall home improvement' 

edition. Available in next week's 

Lakeland Newspapers. 




Fantastic savings for your 
Home & Garden. Plus a chance 
to win gift certificates from the 
following advertisers: 



Air Service 
Lester's Materials 
Schmidt Implement 
Mundelein Frame House 
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Leath Furniture 
Vertical Blinds 
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k- *i m i ■■H»l,|Wi l l » |l l 



October 1, 1999 



FALL HOME & GARDEN 



Lakeland Newspapers / B 1 5 






Fall fertilization: research proves the grass is greener in spring 



For decades, golf course superintendents 
in the snow belt have applied natural organic 
fertilizers in late fall or prior to a permanent 
snow cover for earlier spring green-up and 
root development. Homeowners In the north 
can apply this same practice • known as dor- . 
mant fertilization - to their yards for a vibrant 
spring lawn. 

Recent research indicates that a dormant 
application of an organic fertilizer such as 
Milorganite not only causes turfgrass to 
green-up a week or two earlier in spring, but 
also helps maintain good turf color and 
growth rates through mid-May. In fact, some 
industry experts consider fall the most Impor- 
tant season for lawn fertilization. 

The research - conducted by Dr. Wayne 
Kussow, a leading turf specialist at the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin-Madison - also indicates 
that turfgrass with dormant-applied Milor- 
ganite recovers from winter damage more 
rapidly and better handles heavy foot traffic 
"Homeowners can benefit from the same . 
practices of turf maintenance professionals," 
said Alan Nees. director of marketing Tor 
Milorganite Divisfon-MMSD in Milwaukee. 

"They can use Milorganite on lawns, trees, 
shrubs, flowers and vegetables - just about 
anything that grows In soil. And dormant fer- 
tilization will give homeowners a head start 
on ihelr spring lawns." 

In the University of Wisconsin-Madison 
study, test plots with dormant-applied Milor- 
ganite displayed significantly darkey green 
spring color than those without dormant ap- 
plications. Research results contradict the 
commonly held belief that nitrogen can't be 
released when soil temperatures drop below 
50 degrees Fahrenheit. Nitrogen is the prima- 
ry element responsible for early turfgrass 
green-up. 
Speaking from Experience 

No one can attest to the advantages of 
dormant-applied Milorganite more than a 
golf course superintendent. 

Mark Kuhns, superintendent for Oak- 
mom Country Club, Pittsburgh, has used 
Milorganite for dormant feeding since 1979. 
"We came out of that winter, and 1 was in 



awe/ recalled Kuhns. "Since then, I've been a 
firm believer In Milorganite." 

A resilient turf Is probably the biggest ad- 
vantage to dormant-applied Milorganite, ac- 
cording to Kuhns. "It really gives turfgrass a vi- 
brant look In the spring," said the Pennsylva- 
nia-based superintendent "Milorganite is 
able to sustain the turf throughout the severe 
winter months, especially'january and Febru- 
ary." 

Steve Dallcy, superintendent for Brown 
Deer Park Golf Course, Milwaukee, also can 
attest to the advantages of dormant-applied 
Milorganite. "It gives the grass an excellent 
start for the new golf season," he said, noting 
that he applies the fertilizer to a variety of ar- 
eas, Including fairways, greens and roughs. 

Bailey has used Milorganite for nearly 30 
years. Above all, he said he prefers its slow-re- 
lease, non-buming formula. "There's a high 
burn potential for fast-release fertilizers,'' he 
explained. 
'Getting the Most from Milorganite 

Indeed, Kussow's research proves what 
golf course superintendents have known for 
decades - that dormant-applied Milorganite 
Improves turf quality. Homeowners also can 
take advantage of dormant-applied Milorgan- 
ite for a resilient green lawn. 

For best results, homeowners with cool- 
season, northern grasses (eg., Kentucky blue- 
grass, fescues and ryegrass) should apply one 
40- pound bag of Milorganite per 2,500 square 
feet of lawn in fall (after the last mowing or 
prior to a permanent show cover), late spring 
{mld-to-late May) and late summer (late Au- 
gust to early September). Milorganite doesn't 
need to be watered-ln, but watering will expe- 
dite its benefits. Milorganite's slow -release 
formula provides steady, uniform growth 
without scorching or striping lawns. 
Milorganite can be easily applied to lawns 
with any drop- or rotary-spreader. Informa- 
tion for calibrating common spreaders Is 
available on Milorganite bags. 

For more information about Milorganite, 
or to receive Information about its many uses, 
call 1 - 800-30-; -620-1 or visit www.milorgan- 
ite.org. 



TORO 



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Patented Power Curve rotor system cleans 
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• GRAYSLAKE* 

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SALES, INC. 

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And Small Engino Repair 
701 Rockland Road (RL 176) 

* 847-395-3080 




For decades, golf course superintendents in the snow belt have applied natural or- 
ganic fertilizers in late fall or prior to a permanent snow cover for earlier spring 
green-up and root development. Homeowners in the north can apply this same 
practice. 

Flames without the fuss 



Arc you aware that you can Install a fire- 
place In your home for about the cost of a 
three-day vacation? That you can turn iron 
and off with, the flick of a switch? That there's 
no wood to lug, no mess to clean? -That it will 
heat not only the room it's in, but more? And 
that you can fuel that fireplace with gas, either 
natural or propane, which means technology 
is available to you, no matter where you live? 

Gas hearth products have taken over the 
market from other fuels, much like gas grills 
arc taking over from charcoal, why? Conve- 
nience. Pure and simple, convenience. 

The squeeze of time imposed by job and 
family, home chores and recreation, has 
boosted sales of products that reduce the time 
required by their predecessors. A gas grill pro- 
duces instant Dames, eliminating the time re- 
quired to light charcoal and wait until it turns 
gray. Perhaps 15 to 20 minutes saved? At the 
push of a button your hearth roars to life, pro- 
viding instant heat and ambiance, and elimi- 
nating the gathering of kindling, paper and 
wood, and the time required to produce a 
roaring blaze. Twenty minutes saved? 



While 20 minutes may not seem like 
much, it's enough to guarantee that owners of 
gas hearths and gas grills will use their units 
much more frequently than those with wood 
or charcoal 

• Gas stoves and fireplaces are available in 
variety of Btu ranges, with fully adjustable 
controls. Flame technology is such that it's 
becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish 
a gas from wood fire. And if you haven't ex- 
plored die possibilities, you'll find installation 
a relative snap. 

Direct-vent technology eliminates the 
need for a chimney or major remodeling. 
These units vent directly through the wall, 
much like your clothes dryer. In addition, di- 
rect- vent heartji products take their combus- 
tion air from outside, and vent combustion 
by-products directly outdoors, this method is 
both safer and healthier. 

. For more information on gas hearth ap- 
pliances, as well as other hearth products, a 
free copy of the 86-page Hearthwarming: A 
Guide to Hearth Products is available by call- 
ing 1-800-835-4323, 



Knowledgeable, Friendly Staff 



*&& 










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■i* *-">>. 






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Jumbo She Mom* 



.T^jr-t 






40960 Mill Creek Rd. Wadsworth 

(847) 838-0501 

FALL HOURS: Mon.-Sal. 7 am - 5 pm; Sun. It) am - It pm 

Directions to Mill Creek Nursery: 41 North to Kte. I?:i (Rosecrans) 
West to (1st Intersection) Mill Creek Rd., Left on gravel road \t'l mile to \urser> Si^n. 



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B 1 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



October 1, 1999 



CrttJt Dim Right!, 



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B5 §§& " l ii i iawiw ^*'- 

Thinking new carpet? Your timing couldn't be b etter 



i* **»'.> 



A sampling of your 
Berber options: 

♦ 26 oz. at $8.96 per yard installed 

♦ 28 oz. Commercial Berber at 
$11.96 per yard installed, with pad 

♦ Hefty 50 oz. at $14.94 per yard 
installed, with pad . 

And dozens morel 



March*/- 2000 



'1 ^ F 1 N A N C. I S G 



Septe m berw'2000 



3.5 «■ hNANCI.S G 



..•■■-•■■- 

Hundreds of rolls in stock- priced to move during our sale yyeefcS 
One of the largest most diverse carpet selections in the Mid westl 



A sampling of your 
Regular Plush options: 

♦ 26 oz. at $8.96 per yard installed, with pad 

♦ 40 oz. Trackless at $13.88 per yard 
installed, with pad 

♦ 58 oz. Wear Dated Gold Label Trackless at 
$23.49 per yard installed, with pad 

♦ 75 oz. Anti Crush Resister III at $25.72 per. 
yard installed, with pad 

And dozens more! 



Through Saturday October 16 only! 













You are only minutes ctvtmj 
i. from the Signature Experience! 

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HQUH4I 

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LIFE'S A BEAR 

Mr. & Mrs. Beatty in the 
White House? /B2 



PARENT'S PLACE 

Are the 10 Commandments 
a bad thing? /B1 2 



MOVIE REVIEW 

'Three Kings' is a 
royal movie /B7 



LakeLi 



PULL oui 

SECTION 



Section 




At ihe age of 55, Jim Brown has 
spent more than four decades 
restoring old cars. What began 
as a necessity has grown to be- 
come a life-long hobby for the 
Wildwood resident. 
Brown's addiction to car 
restoring and collecting began 
when he was 13-years-oId. His first effort was 
• In 1 958 or <59. : 1 1 wns so long ago that tlte de- 
tails are getting fuzzy. The car was a"19St Ford 
Custom that he bought for $50. 

He took that first piece of "road iron" 
apart and lowered it to 2 inches off the 
ground. The result was a "good old-fashioned 
hot rod," Brown said as he beamed with 
pride. 

"Back then you could pull things 
off one car (from different years), put it 
on another and do it all again," he said. 
Brown believes that over the years 
he has restored about 50 vehicles, each 
requiring varying degrees of attention 
and work. 

He was showing his latest recreation at 
the car rally during Gurnee Days in Au- 
gust: a 1968 Poniiac GTO that he discov- 
ered in an Island Lake cornfield. The car 
had a smashed front end and no trunk. It 
took Brown two-and-a-half years at five 
nights a week to restore the vehicle. He be- 
lieves he has spent' S 12,000 on parts and 
materials and the Volo Antique Auto Mu- 
seum has appraised the vehicle at $16,000, 
though he said he wouldn't take less than 



$23,000 for it. 

Frank Elgas of Beach Park 
Is a late-comer to collecting 
and restoring cars. In fact, he 
sold two other toys— his pick 

up truck and travel-trailer— so The Volo Antique Auto Museum meets the needs of classic car collectors. More than 250 cars 
that he could buy his first pro- are on view in 150,000-square-feet of showroom.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 
ject, a 1966 Chevrolet Impala 



Super SporL 

IMf^l've always wanted one 
and 1 never had the money," Bgas said. He 

added that he hadn't been using his travel- 
trailer much, so the decision was easier than 
he thought. 

Elgas has mainly made small updates to 
his cruiser. For example, he replaced the clock 



South DakotaJnJuly. TJiej&how is a large 
one, with six Impala clubs from around the 
country gathering. 

Though Brown and Elgas represent oppo- 
site ends of the spectrum, people collect and 
restore cars for different reasons. 

Greg Grams and his family run the Volo 



Lake County car collectors motivated 
by love of chrome, appreciative stares 



in the dashboard with a tachometer, detailed 
the engine and painted it, replaced the seat 
foam and covers, replaced the trunk and glove 
box wiring as well as the emblems on the car. 

In all, he has worked two to three nights a 
week for five years on the car, which has a 
306-cubic-inch engine and packs 325 horse- 
power. 

Elgas is proud of the car and travels 
with it to shows throughout the midwest, 
including the National Impala Associa- 
tion's 20th Anniversary rally in Spearfish 



Antique Auto Museum. He said that collecting 
classic cars has been something of a roller 
coaster ride in recent years, but that it is con- 
sidered a much more steady investment late- 
ly. 

The museum has people visiting from 
across the country each weekend to view his 
inventory of more than 250 cars, all for sale. 
To keep the inventory fresh, Grams said the 
museum buys and sells cars on a daily basis, 
with an average of 70 new cars a month be- 
coming part of the inventory. 



Grams wrote this In the Museum's 
newsletter: "During the last generation, col- 
lectible cars have increased in value some 
1,000 percent Not bad. But as always, the 
ownership of a collectible car should be a 
matter of heart and not a cold calculation of 
future growth." 

For Bob and Nancy Riley, the moti- 
vation was one thing: The need for 
speed. The Rileys bought a car that has 
parts from two cars — a 1965 Chevrolet 
Chevelle and a 1966 Nova. The pair 
drove the car back from California and 
spent 10 months restoring the vehicle 
and adding some racing touches. The Rileys 
have 40 hours in body work alone invested in 
the car. 

Bob Riley said he rebuilt the chassis, 
added rack and pinion steering and struts to 
the front end. He also replaced the glass and 
rubber stripping. 

"1 want the interior to be stock. I want the 
car to appear as it did from the factqry, but I 
want the big motor and big wheels for drag 

Please see TOYS /B2 



^ANNII^ 




1ST 




w 



LAKE 



1949-1999 «? 







Celebrating 50 years of service to the community. Our Golden Anniversary brings you Golden Opportunities. 

SEPTEMBER'S GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY 

HOME EQUITY LOAN, 8.25% APR 

5 YEAR FIXED, $5,000 MINIMUM 

Bring this coupon in with your application and 

receive a gift certificate 

for $10.00 redeemable at any participating 

Round Lake Area Chamber Of Commerce Merchant 



MAIN OFFICE: 

1777 N. Cedar Lake Road 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

(847) 546-2111 



IG 




NG 




Ah of Augu.t 30, 1909, the Annual Percentage Kale (APR) for 5 year, Axed role loan 1* 8.25%. 

The payment, on a $5,000 loan Would l»e 11.25V* AlMt. 60 payment- of SI Ol. 98. Loan to value mini he lew than 

00% No clorfmt ««mU. No annual fee. Property limuratice required. Flood hazard iimurauce may he required. 

Commit your tux udvUor regurdliiK tax deductible «ttatu» of your loan. . 



BRANCH OFFICE: 

Avilon & Goodnow Blvds. 
Round Lake, IL 

(847)546-8444 A 



UNO?* 



> l % * « - 



B2/ 'Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



October 8, 1999 



FROM PAGE Bl 



TOYS: Stares, chrome attract collectors 



'5 



The cor has a 434 cubic-inch- 
displacement engine, is powered 
partly by a nitrous fog system. Ce- 
ramic exhaust adds to the race feel. 
The car has been restored for the Ri- 
ley's pleasure, as it isn't completely 
set for competitive racing. In fact, 
one racetrack allowed him to take a 
lap or two, but he couldn't fully par- 
ticipate because the car does not 
have a roll bar. 

For Drown, there arc several 
benefits he derives from restoring 
the old cars. One is the feeling he 
gets from constantly improving 
them. "You're always finding things 
to improve," he said. He said he has 
devoted a great deal of time, effort 
and money to his GTO. He spent 
three months and $400 searching for 
a power antenna for the car. Origi- 
nally the antenna came with the 
car's stereo radio as a $160 option. 
The whole idea of investing count- 
less hours and $12,000 into a car that 
sold 31 years ago for $3,980 may 
sound like a bit too much, but 
Brown says its worth it. 

Another big reason he docs it is 



it's ail he's known. "I 
grew up with it, I love It," 
he said. The hobby was 
also bom of necessity. 
Brown said Uiat repairing 
his first few cars was the 
only way he was going to 
get transportation. "That 
was the only way I could 
get around— buy a car no 
one else wanted and fix it 
up," he said. 

He said his parents 
didn't have the money to 
buy him a car, so he 
learned to be resource- 
ful. What Brown's par- pat Levinson, of Wildwood, fine tunes the 1973 
ents couldn't give him, Z28 that he an his wife Paula showed at the 

ui!i M w °i ! uS* m S i" 9 G"™* 3 Days Car $t™ h VB*« Park. — 
the cars, his younger son 




Splendor in the 
White House? 



is, though Brown believes he still 
asks him to do too much of the 
work. 

Brown's 30-year-old daughter 
Melissa Phillips of Wisconsin is 
much more of a do-it-yourselfer. He 
is proud of the fact that she can tear 



apart an engine and put it back to- 
gether. 

One of Brown's biggest motiva- 
tions is the reaction he gets in the 
form of looks and comments from 
strangers. "This is it, people love it," 
he said. 



Sometimes -we aCCfieecfa CittCe fieCp. 



y 






*-•*■"- :.". . 



-■'' %m* : * ■ 



Lorraine Reum and her niece, 
Darlene Polsgrove, learn more- about 
assisted living at The Village from 
Assisted Living Director Georgette Miller. 



e^f you're an older adult and could use an arm to lean on every 
now and then, Assisted Living at Victory Lakes is for you. 

Find it all at the Assisted Living Suites at Victory Lakes: 

■)C Studio or alcove apartments, designed to 
meet your personal needs 

•K Suites with your own tea kitchen including 
a refrigerator, sink and microwave oven 

■K Three nutritious meals a day 
■fc Personal care supervision 
»K Housekeeping services 
4< Emergency call system 

■fc Creative recreational and social activities 
"fc Priority access to the Continuing Care Center 

Let lis show you Assisted Living at 




theWjage 



at Victory Lakes 

1065 Victory Drive 

Lindenhurst, IL 60046 

(847) 356-4800 



I COMLOFfOflltMIYtOWKl 



I am so sorry, readers. I owe you 
an apology. I suddenly realized 
that you expect the worst from 
me as a member of the "me- 
dia," and when it comes to Cam- 
paign 2000, 1 have not been giving it 
to you! 

Here it Is, more than a year away 
from the next election, and I have 
not written a single word about any 
of (he possible candidates yet. How 
can 1 do a proper job of boringyou 
to death with repetitive stories and 
endless speculation (known back In 
Shakespeare's time as "Much ado 
about nothing..."} unless I get start- 
ed now? 

So, let me begin. And what bet- 
ter candidate to begin with than a 
non-candidate from Tinseltown! 

As some of you may be aware, 
there has been a recent media fren- 
zy surrounding speculation that 
Warren Beatty may run for political 
office. Somewhere a rumor got start- 
ed — maybe by Warren, maybe his 
publicist, or maybe his maid (who 
may have overheard him say to his 
wife, "I'm going to run"— meaning 
he was going for a jog). Though no 
one knows where the rumor began, 
what keeps the buzz going is that 
while he has not said publicly that 
he IS going to run for President, he 
has yet to announce that he ISNT. 
This could just be an old actor's 
trick, as In "any publicity is good 
publicity," but let's assume, for the 
purpose of some easy column mate- 
rial, that Warren Beatty IS seriously 
considering a bid to be the Democ- 
ratic candidate for President. This is 
not that crazy of an idea, since the 
American people have already 
demonstrated that they are willing 
and able to put a movie siar. his ac- 
tress wife and her astrologer in the 
White House. 

Besides, in our current scandal- 
digging political climate, Warren 
Beatty could just be the perfect can- 
didate to replace ('resident Clinton. 
It seems reasonable to assume that 
the American people will be loathe 
to elect, in the year 2000, another 
supposedly happily- married man 
who may not have had his fill of 
groupies and designing women. 
Which is why Warren Beatty might 
be just the ticket. 

1 lore's a guy who up until a few 
years ago, managed to remain Hol- 
lywood's ultimate swinging single, 
and had so many women that his fa- 
mous sister, Shirley MacLainc, once 
quipped that maybe she should 
sleep with Warren just to sec what 
all the fuss is about. 




LIFE'S 
A BEAR 



'• &' Donna Abear 



Here's a guy who, If elected and 
approached by a thong-flashing 
bimbo in the White House, would 
probably just yawn and say, "Been 
there. Done that." 

Here's a guy whose dating histo- 
ry, and the fact that according to 
past press, he remained friends with 
many of his previous "amours," pro- 
vides him with a built-in constituen- 
cy, consisting of the roughly 9 mil- 
lion women he dated prior to his 
marriage to Annette Bening. 

Also, Beatty has an advantage 
that not even Reagan enjoyed. While 
Reagan's claim to movie fame in- 
cluded stints as a football player and 
a companion to a monkey, Mr. Beat- 
ty recently starred as "Bulworth," 
sort of an outrageous Presidential 
candidate who wins over the Ameri- 
can public by sheer damn -thc-con- 
sequenccs honesty. 

Come to think of it, the character 
of "Bulworth" doesn't seem far- 
fetched when you consider Jesse 
Ventura, the current outspoken and 
rather outrageous governor of Min- 
nesota. 

Not only that, but Warren has 
an additional advantage in the form 
of his lovely wife, Annette Bening. Is 
It sheer coincidence that she also 
starred In a movie about the presi- 
dency, where she played a woman 
who dates and then marries the 
president? 

\ Or is It perhaps parr of a well-de- 
signed plan by Mr. and Mrs. Beatty to 
cut their teeth on some REAL acting: 
politics at the White House level? 

Or maybe I'm just trying to fig- 
ure out ways to get to the end of this 
column. 

Regardless, I must admit that I 
am enjoying entertaining the possi- 
bility of a candidacy by former Hol- 
lywood stud muffin, Warren Beatty. 
It would make Campaign 2000 
much more fun when you think 
there might be a candidate from the 
Democratic party who has more 
stage presence than a turnip. 

Personally, I'm keeping my fin- 
gers crossed. 

Questions or comments for 
humorist Donna Abear can be sen t to 
P.O. Box391, Antioch, IL 60002. 



Norris Theatre announces 
21st Season performance line-up 



'Hie Norris Theatre, of St. 
Charles announces its 1999-2000 
season which is scheduled to begin 
on Saturday, October 9 with a per- 
formance by the legendary Al Jar- 
reau. 

Appropriately themed "Tran- 
scending Time Through the Arts" 
this will be the Norris Theatre's 
21st season of entertaining. The 
season opening Al jarreau perfor- 
mance will begin at 7:30 p.m. on 
Saturday, October 9. Mr. Jarreau 
will be accompanied by the Illi- 
nois chamber Symphony, tickets 
are now available. The Norris' 
season will run through late May 
with 24 scheduled shows. 

In an salute to the 20th century, 
this season the Norris Theatre will 
bring back old favorites and intro- 
duce new faces, the Illinois Cham- 
ber Symphony's electric "Music of 
the World" concert season will be 
housed at the Norris Theatre. Other 
new faces to be included tills season 



are the joffrey Ballet of Chicago, 
John Amos Starring in his one man 
show "Halley's Comet" and 
renowned jazz flutist Hcrble Mann 
performing with his group Sona 
Terra accompanied by the Illinois 
Chamber Symphony. Returning af- 
ter higlily acclaimed past perfor- 
mances will be The Nylons, The 
Four Bitchin' Babes, Terry 
Evanswood Magic, The Lettermen 
and more. 

In conjunction with the open- 
ing night Al jarreau performance, 
the Arts Society of the Norris Cultur- 
al Arts Center will sponsor a raffle, 
tickets for the prize, a raffle basket 
valued at 2,800, are currently being 
sold. 

Information on the raffle and 
the Norris Theatre's new season is 
available by calling the Norris Box 
Office at (603) 584-7200 ext. 10. The 
new season brochure, designed by 
Anne Hunt of AVH Graphix will be 
mailed the last week of August. 



October 8, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

Cornfield creatures beware! 

Scarecrow festival 

October 8-10 

Nearly 100 hand-crafted scarecrows converge In downtown 
St Charles Tor the 14th annual Scarecrow Festival. Please 
come and vote for your favorite scarecrow in each of five 
categories. The festival is held Oct. 8* 10. Hours arc Friday 
and Saturday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Anyone can enter a scarecrow In the 
competition. The whimsical, often 
wild and cleverly constructed scare- 
crows compete in a popular vote by 
festival goers In five categories: 
Traditional, Whimsical, Me- 
chanical, Children's and 
St. Charles Business. This 
event is free and open to 
individuals, families, 
clubs and businesses. 
The total prize money of 
$2000 Is provided by Old Kent and 
divided among the (op winners in 
four of the categories. Winners are an- 
nounced at 4:30 p.m. Sunday in the 
Main Tent at Lincoln Park. 

Scarecrows are just the beginning of this annual event. 
Throughout downtown St. Charles, the festival offers an Antique 
Show, Carnival, children's activities, great food, live musical enter- 
tainment and more. Don't miss The Blooze Brothers Live Rhythm & 
Blues Revue on Saturday night Visit the Pillsbury fun Tent, Satur- 
day from 12 -3 p.m. and meet the Pillsbury Doughboy. Sports Av- 
enue, located In Pottawatomie Park offers plenty of activities for the 
sports enthusiast. 

The popular Autumn on the Fox Arts & Crafts Show, held Fri- 
day thru Sunday form 9 a.m.-5 p.m., is located in Pottawatomie 
Park along the scenic Fox River, featuring over 200 artisans and 
crafters. 

For further Information please 630-377-6161 or 1-800-777- 
4373. 




THEATRE 




'Broadway Bound' 

atPM&L 

There are two more weekends of 
performances for PNL Theatre's pro- 
duction of Neil Simon's, 
Broadway Bound. Third 
In an autobiographical 
trilogy, it picks up ' 
where Brighton Beach 
Memoirs and Bitoxl 
Blues ended. Remain- 
ing show date is October 
10 at 2:30 p.m. The PM&LThcatre is 
located at 877 N. Main Street (RL 83), 
Antioch. 

Mickey Mandcl from Antioch is 
the Director. Cast members arc Linda 
Hachmeistcr, Kevin Count and Gerry 
Mandcl from Antioch; Linda Mason 
and Steve Winding from Lindcnhurst 
and Chuck Lindas from Kenosha, WI. 

For reservations call 395-3055. 
Ticket prices are S10 for adults and $8 
for students and seniors. 

Franz and Zelda's Happy 
Time Cabaret Hour 

The Tingle Tangle theater proud- 
ly presents a brand new installment of 
Franz and Zelda's Happy Time 
Cabaret Hour, written and performed 
by John Osterhagcn and Juliet Schac- 
fcr, directed by Richard Ragsdalc. 
The production will run at Breadline 
Theater, located at 1802 W. Berenice, 
Chicago. The production Is sched- 
uled through November 5. The 
phone number for reservations is 
(733)226-9947. 

Franz and Zelda's Happy Time 
Cabaret Hour is a unique cabaret 
show featuring unconventional tunes, 
zany characters, and lots of audience 
participation. Franz and Zclda, 
refugees from the miniscule, war-torn 
country of Heinzelmachia, were big 
cabaret stars in their homeland. 

All performances take place at 
Breadline Theater, 1802 W. Berenice. 

For more Information about 
Franz and Zelda's Happy Time 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 2 1 /April 20 
Try to help a co-worker who gets Into 
trouble this week. Ho or she gets 
caught In the middle of a difficult situa- 
tion arid doesn't know what to do. A 
few words from you can rectify the situ- 
ation. Donl let this person down. A 
loved one asks your advice about a ro- 
mantic problem. Be honest and sup- 
portive when talking with him or her. 

Taurus - April 2 1/May 21 
Don't give up on something that you 
truly want just because you hit a 
roadblock. You can overcome this mi- 
nor setback if you stay calm and col' 
lected. A close friend invites you out 
late In the week. Say yes, because 
it's sure to be a good time. Gemini 
plays an important rote. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
Try not to get upset with an Indecisive 
friend early in the week. He or she is 
confused and really needs your ad- 
vice. Try to help. A loved one sets 
you up on a blind date. While you're 
angry, go out with this person any- 
way, it is sure to be a lot of fun. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 
An old friend calls you out of the blue 
late in the week, Cancer. White you're 
glad to hear from this person, don't 
be too excited. He or she wants 
something from you. Try to find out 
what it is. That special someone has 
a surprise for you. Enjoy it! Virgo 
plays a key role on Friday. 

Leo - Juty 23/August 23 
Don't let your ego get the best of you 
when talking with a business associate 
this week, Leo. While you are a valued 
employee, so are a lot of people. Donl 
forget that, because your higher-ups 
sure wont An Interesting person asks 
you out late in the week. Say yes, be- 
cause it will be a good time. 

Virgo- Aug 24/Sept 22 
Don't be too critical of a loved one 
who makes an honest mistake this 
week, Virgo. This person really does 
think that he or she Is doing the right 
thing. Offer your assistance in getting 
everything straightened out. A good 
friend asks a favor of you. Do what 
you can to help — even though you 
may not want to. 

Libra - Sept 23/Oct 23 

Pay attention to what Is going on 

around you this week, Libra. Several 



acquaintances are trying to pull the 
wool over your eyes. Donl let them. 
Keep your wits about you, and you'll 
do Just fine. A friend of a friend re- 
veals his or her true feelings for you. 
While you don't want to hurt this per- 
son, you have to be honest. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
Don't keep your emotions bottled up 
when It comes to that special some- 
one this week. He or she needs to 
know how you really feel. Open up to 
this person. While it will be difficult 
for you, It definitely will be worth it. A 
business associate shares a secret 
with you. Keep it to yourself; you 
don't have the right to tell anyone 
about this. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Think before you speak when it 
comes to an Important financial 
meeting early In the week, Sagittar- 
ius. If you're not careful, you will say 
something that you regret and miss 
out on a lucrative opportunity. A 
close friend needs your advice about 
a personal problem, Do what you 



14th Annual 



can to help him or her. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
Stand your ground when it comes to 
a disagreement with a co-worker. 
You know that you are right; dont let 
this person bully you. The higher-ups 
will be on your side. That special 
someone wants to take a break. 
Don't get upset. This Is exactly what 
your relationship needs right now. 

Aquarius -Jan 21 /Feb 18 
Donl cover up for an acquaintance 
who makes a serious mistake this 
week. This person knows what he or 
she Is doing; this situation is no acci- 
dent. Make him or her own up to it. A 
loved one gets you Involved In a family 
disagreement Try to help everyone 
Involved reach a compromise. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
Try to help a friend who gets Into 
trouble early In the week, Pisces. He 
or she truly will appreciate your ef- 
forts. That special someone treats 
you to a night on the town late In the 
week. Enjoy yourself, because you 
deserve It. 



FALL DIDDLEY' 

Craft Show 

OVER 300 CRAFTERS AND ARTISTS 

Bake Sale, Food Concessions and Raffle 






Saturday, October 9 

1 AM to 5 PM 

Sunday, October 10 

9 AM to 4 PM 



| BOONE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

IL Rt. 76 & Bus. Rt. 20 • Belvidere, II 

FREE FAIRGROUND PARKING 



Admission: $4 
(Age 1 2 and over) 



± DOONE 
^COUNTY 

FAJRGROUNDS 

0«tvU«te 




@ Xnc 



Cabaret Hour, please contact Juliet 
Schacfcrat (733) 561-4207. 



AUDITIONS 



Auditions at 
CenterStage 

CcntcrStage in Lake Forest, wiU 
hold auditions for a chamber theatre 
production of A ChiUi's Christmas in 
Wales on Saturday and Sunday, Oct 
16 -17, from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.: 
With callbacks on Monday, Oct. IB, at 
7:00 p.m. Auditions will be held In the 
Gorton Community Center, 400 E. Illi- 
nois, Lake Forest. Auditions include 
cold readings from the script. Seeking 
-adults and teens over 14. Perfor- 
mances In mid December. Edward 
Kuffcrt directs. Call 835-0608 for 
more Information. 

Auditions for 
The Jungle Book' 

Highland Park Players holds open 
auditions 730-9:30 p.m. Oct 11-12 for 
Its January production of The Jungle 
Book,' at the Kargcr Center, 1850 
Green Bay Road, Highland Park. 
There arc six roles available for men 
and women, ages 16+ for this interac- 
tive children's production. 

Performances will be held on Janu- 
ary 15 -16, 2000. For more informa- 
tion, call 604-4771. 



HEALTH 



Infant Massage Classes 
Offered at Gorton 

"Infant Massage: Loving Touch to 
Crow On" will be held monthly at 
Gorton Community Center, 400 East 
Illinois Road, Lake Forest Sessions 
are S35 each, and will take place from 
1 30 am.-12:30 p.m. The next classes 
are scheduled for October 12, Novem- 
ber 9 and December 14. Parents or 
caregivers may take classes on an in- 
dividual basis or one per month. 

Ellen Winlck. Nationally Certified 
Massage Therapist, will lead this in- 
structional course for parents and 
their babies, newborn through pre- 
crawll no. Parents wiU learn basic mas- 
sage techniques and share the healing 
and bonding power of touch. 

Interested participants should 
register and pay In advance. For fur- 
ther Information, or to receive a pro- 
gram brochure, contact or stop by the 
Gorton office at 234-6060 between 9 
a.m. and 430 p.m., weekdays. 

Daytime Hatha Yoga 
continues at Gorton 

Barbara Spietz, Holistic Trainer 
and Practical Living Yoga Instructor, 
will teach classes at Gorton Commu- 
nity Center, 400 East Illinois Rd., Lake 
Forest, beginning Friday, October 8, 
from 10:30 a.m. - 12 noon. The class 
runs through December 17 (no class 
November 26), and the fee is $80. 

Barbara's extensive 30-year ca- 
reer in education emphasizes a blend 
of Eastern philosophy with Western 
"know-how" for a practical approach 
to wellness. This class provides a safe, 
proven method to achieve total 
mind/body fitness by combining the 
5.000 year-old tradition of Hatha Yoga 
with a contemporary exercise philos- 
ophy. Enjoy the rewards of increased 



strength, flexibility, balance and relax- 
ation as you perform postures, exer- 
cise, and mental imagery. Bring a mat 
and a small, firm pillow. 

Interested participants should 
register and pay in advance. For fur- 
ther Information contact the Gorton 
office at 234-6060 between 9 a.m. and 
430 p.m., weekdays. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 



,. I ..,,.,, ) ni.. 1 .n....,.Mnm'i.... 



Farm Museum holds 
"Harvest Days" 

Garfield Farm museum will hold 
Its annual Fall Harvest Days on Sun- 
day, Oct 10. 

Harvest Days feature historic 
farm and household skill demonstra- 
tions at this 1840s farm and teamster 
Inn. Music, tall tales, food, and tours 
of the 1846 inn are offered. 

Hours are 1 1 a. m. to 4:30 p.m. 
The museum is 5 miles west of Gene- 
va, off of Rt. 38 on Garfield Rd. 

Adult donation Is $5 and $2 for 
children under 13. Youth groups un- 
der 13 are $350 per student Call 630- 
584 -8485 for more information. 

TGem & Mineral 
Show Oct. 8-10 

The Lake County Gem & Mineral 
Society is holding Its 34th annual 
show tilled "Wonderland of Gems- 
Jewelry and Minerals" Oct 8-10 at the 
Mundelein Holiday Inn on State Rte. 
45 & 83 in Mundelein. The hours are 
Fri. 2-6 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun. 
10 a.nx-5 p.m. Entry fee for adults Is 
$2; seniors 62 and over are half price 
and children under age 12 no charge. 

For more information, call 223- 
5445 or 546-5382. 

Gas Engine Show at 
Illinois Railway Museum 

Rich Thomas will present a dis- 
play of antique "hit and miss" gas en- 
gines at the Illinois Railway Museum's 
Harvest Days Celebration October 9- 
10. Running Saturday and Sunday 
from 10*30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., the cele- 
bration is the museum's last special 
event of 1999. 

In addition to the engine show, 
the museum will have all o( Us exhibit 
buildings open and vriu be offering 
ride* on ll» 10 mile tang demonstra- 
tion railway and 1 mile streetcar line. 
The Illinois Railway Museum is 
located five miles northwest of the US 
20 exit on the Northwest Toll road. I- 
90, about 35 miles west of O 'Ha re Air- 
port. 

Fall Diddley Craft 
Show returns 

The Mental Health Resource 
League for McHenry County will 
sponsor the 14th Annual Fall Diddley 
Craft Show at the Boone County Fair- 
grounds in Belvidere. 
The show will be o5*£2&*^ 
held on Saturday, tir ^ 
Oct 9, from 10 gf 
a.m. — 5 p.m., and §( 
on Sunday, Oct. X-^K^^P-fy 
10, from 9 a.m. — 4 »s^^/* 
p.m. The fair- ^^TSSr^ 

grounds are located on 
Route 76, just North of Business 
Route 20 In Belvidere. From 1-90, take 
the Genoa Road exit and drive North 

Continued on the next page 



Spoftwcd by the NWunteen of 
THE MENTAL HEALTH KESOUKCE 
LEAGUE FOK MCHENKY COUNTY I 



Presents 

Broadway Bound 

A Comedy by Neil Simon 
Directed by Mickey Eckmann Mandel 

October 8, 9 

at 8:00 p.m. 

October 10 

at 2:30 p.m. 

Fri, & Sat. 8 p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antioch 

Box Office Now Open 

3cx CXKfl Koui* Uc»v thru Thur*. 6:30-7.30 p-m.; Sal. 112 ME3 
1 1/2 bn. bdw» *N»*in*. RwetvwJ Seating VISA'MC «K_3 



B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



October 8, 1999 



1 •-• ' 


j. 








fe,;, 



Continued from the previous page 

for approximately five miles. 
Admission is S4 for ages 12 and over. 
For Info'rmolion for the year 2000, 
crafters may write to MHRL, P.O. Box 
204, McHcnry, 60050 or call (015)305- 
5745. 

Goddess Gourd Festival 
to be held Oct. 9-10 

For a unique experience, why not 
check out this special festival cele- 
brating and honoring the earth and all 
ofits abundance, 

It will be held on October 9 - 10, at 
Prairie Crossing 
In Grayslakc, 
from 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m. {rain or 
shine). 

Artists 
demonstrations 
will be con-, 
ducted besides a large variety of activ- 
ities such as hayrldcs, storytelling, 
music and craft sales. 

Prairie Crossing is on Route 45, 
1/2 mile south of Route 12, in 
Grayslakc. Admission is S3, children 
can attend free of charge, 

For further information call 773* 
267-2413 or visit their website: happy- 
pages.com/goddcssgourdfestival. 

Bountiful bead bazaar 

Antique beads, lampworkcd 
beads, glass beads, imported beads: 
beads-of every imaginable material 
will be on display (and for sale) at the 
semi-annual Suburban Fine Arts Cen- 
ter Bead Sale Sunday, Oct. 17, 10:00 
a.m.-5:00p.m. 

The ancient art of bead making in 
the hands of modern artists bring 
masks and lampshades, and jewelry 
to the Highland Park Community 
House, 1991 Sheridan Road, Highland 
Park. More than 50 vendors from 
around the country will have their 
wares on display. There is a $2 admis- 
sion charge. 

The Suburban Fine Arts Center is a 
not for profit art gallery and school 
that offers more than 90 classes in dif- 
ferent media to adults and children. 
Located at 1913 Sheridan Rd., High- 
land Park. The SFAC is open 9 :00 a.m. 
to 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday. For 
more information about the Oct. 17, 
bead sale, call 432- 1 880. 



KIDS STUFF 



Houdini Anniversary 
in McHenry 

A 'Harry Houdini Tribute" mark- 
ing the 73rd anniversary of his death 
on Halloween will be held on Sunday, 
Oct. 10 at 3 p.m. at Kreuger's Veg- 
etable Farm in McHenry. Everyone 
will witness Las Vegas style magician 
Nino Cruz and his two top pupils, 
"Boomdini" (age 14) and Joe Wan- 
radc (age 1 1} as they perform fun and 
impressive mindreading, supernatur- 
al ES.P and exciting magic shows at 
this charitable event for free, 

Nino will also attempt Houdini's 
famous "Straight-Jacket Escape," 
hanging upside-down 2-3 stories up! 
No one has ever attempted this before 
In or around McHenry County! Ad- 
mission is free to this unforgettable 



event and all donations go to the 
"WGN's Neediest Kids Foundation." 
"Krucgcr's Halloween Customer 
Appreciation Days" starts Oct. 0, 
through Sunday the Oct. 10 at 20572 
W. Route 120 McHenry. 



Sand painting class 
offered for children 

A "Native American Sand Paint- 
ing" class for children will be offered 
at the Anderson Arts Center's Kid's 
Space, 124 66th St. In Kenosha on Sat., 
Oct. 30 from 9 to II a.m. 

The class will be taught by artist 
Katy Scarmardo and is designed for 
children between the ages of and 
13. Students will explore the art of 
Native American symbolism and pic- 
ture writing. Students will dye sand 
and create images on paper with 
sand that reflects this ancient art 
form. 

The fee for "Native American 
Sand Painting" is $20 pcrchild which 
includes alt supplies. Registration 
deadline is Fri., Oct. 1 5. The class size 
is limited to just 1 2 students. To regis- 
ter, call the office at Kemper Center at 
4 14-657-6005 during regular business 
hours. 



ART 



Art exhibit at 
Opera House 

During the month ofOctober, Gale 
Guntcr and Thomas Trausch will be 
exhibiting their work in the Commu- 
nity Room at the Woodstock Opera 
House. 

Earth, Water and Stone, will be a 
two-person show, consisting of oil 
paintings, water colors and acrylic 
paintings. 

Guntcr is a local art teacher in 
Woodstock, who enjoys drawing, 
painting and collage work. Trausch is 
a long time Woodstock resident and 
has been a full lime fine artist for over 
25 years. 

The Community Room Gallery is 
open during business hours, 9:00 a.m. 
to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
Saturday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
and during performances. The Com- 
munity Room exhibits arc free to the 
public. 

For more information regarding 
programming and exhibits, please call 
the Woodstock Opera House Admin- 
istrative Office at (815) 338-4212. 

Terra Museum Arts & 
Crafts exhibition 

Arthur Wesley Dow and Ameri- 
can Arts & Crafts, an exhibition of fine 
and decorative arts, will open Satur- 
day, October 9 through Sunday, Janu- 
ary 2 at Terra Museum of American 
Art, 664 N. Michigan Ave., in Chicago. 

The exhibition includes works by 
artists, author and educator, Arthur 
Wesley Dow, as well as by the many 
other artists he taught and influenced. 
In addition to paintings, photographs, 
woodblock prints and tiles, the exhi- 
bition features pottery from New- 
comb College in New Orleans and 
furniture from Byrdclific Colony in 
Woodstock, New York. 

For more information, call TerTa 
Museum of American Art at (312)664- 
3939. 




TALK LIVE 

one-on-one 

1-900-562-4488 

Only $.99 per minute 



Don't 
Forget! 



For the best selection and prices on ne^ 
and pre-driven vehicles, look in the 



Marketplace 



ejr bating gukl*! 



weekly section in your 
Lakeland Newspaper 



CLASSES 



One day Poetry 
Workshop 

A one day Poetry Workshop will 
be offered by die Racdale Foundation, 
located at 1230 North Green Bny Rd., 
Like Forest. The Workshop will be 
held on Saturday, October 9, from 930 
a. m . through 4:30 p.m. the cost per 
person is $125. Class sizes arc limited 
to 1 2 people per class. The workshop 
will be taught by Natalie Kcnvin. 

Natalie Kcnvin Is a Chicago poet 
and short-story writer. She is the au- 
thor of Bntlse theory, a book of po- 
ems and is currently working on her 
second book, Mother Peg's Light. 

For more Information call 234- 
1063. To register, send your check for 
5125 to the Ragdalc Foundation, 1260 
North Green Bay Road, Lake Forest. 

Wine Seminars set 

Internationally-acclaimed Wine 
Merchant, Johnson I to, will lead a 
pair of fine wine seminars at Gorton 
Community Center, 400 East Illinois 
Road, Lake Forest. 

"The Executive Summary of 
Fine Wines" will take place on 
Wednesday, October 6, from 7-9 

[>.m. The fee Is S75. This course is 
or those looking to learn the key 
concepts and quality landmarks of 
high-quality wines, 

"The Sybaritic Champaign Ex- 
travaganza for the Millennium" will 
be held on Wednesday, November 10. 
from 7-9 p.m. the fee is SI 10. 

For further information, or to re- 
ceive a program brochure, contact or 
stop by the Gorton ollicc at 234-6060 
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., week- 
days. 

Junior Sew-Ciety' 
continues at Gorton 

"Junior Sew-ciety," a stitching 
and sewing continual workshop for 
girls aged 6 and older, continues at 
Gorton Community Center, 400 East 
Illinois Rd., Lake Forest. Meetings arc 
set for October 9 and 23; November 6 
and 20; and December 1 , from 1 :30- 
3:30 p.m. 

Interested participants should 
register and pay in advance. For fur- 
ther information, or to receive a pro- 
gram brochure, contact or stop by the 
Gorton office at 234-6060 between D 
a.m. and 4:30 p.m., weekdays. 

LUNCHEON = 

Women's Club monthly 
luncheon 

The Christian Womcns Club pre- 
sents "Fit for Life" luncheon featuring 
fitness tips from die BuehlerYMCA in 
Palatine, will he held on Oct. 14, at the 
BuehlerYMCA, 1400 N.W. Highway, 
Palatine from 1 1:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 

The cost is S10 inclusive and 
babysitting is available at no charge. 
Please call 382- 1202 by Oct. 11 to 
make reservations. Sponsored by the 
Northwest Suburban Christian Wom- 
en's Club. 



MUSIC 



Polish heritage recital 

Tills recital will feature Lester 
Gcrmann, pianist, Polish composers; 
Dtugoroj, Michael of Krakow, Rcys, 
Cato, Bohdanowicz, Szymanowska, 
Kurplnskl, Oginski, Chopin, Mo- 
niuszko, Wicniawski, Nowowicjski, 
Padercwski, Szymanowskl, Tansman, 
Bacewicz, Gcrmann. This musical 
presentation Is Sunday October 10, at 



3 p.m., at the Chopin theatre, 1543 W, 
Division St., Chicago. For more infor- 
mation call 773-2B7-1500. 

'Swingtime at Triton' 

On Sunday, October 10, the Ital- 
ian American War Veterans of the 
United States, Inc (post 2) will present 
the musical variety show "Swingtime" 
featuring the great Bill Porter with his 
orchestra and friends at the Triton 
College Auditorium In River Grove at 
2 PM. Tickets are priced at $20 at the 
door and $1 7.50 In advance. 



'Dracula' sighting at 
Williams Bay campus 

Count Drncula Is coming to Williams Bay, Wis.The campus of 
George Williams Lake Geneva, part of Aurora University, will 
come "alive" with the mystery of mysteries "Dracula" Friday 
through Sunday, Oct. 22-24, 
The historical campus buildings and the out-of-doors lakefront 
will provide the setting for the drama. The cast is part of the Crimson 
Twilight performing arts series. 

"Dracula" has been described by critics as a play for people "who 
like their coffee strong." 

y v The campus administration building will be 

aUaaI/ fl 1 tl ' mc 'd into the home of Dr. Seward. Seward's 
Cli6CK daughter, Lucy, has taken III with a strange anc- 

i y I mia. Dr. Van I lelsing, a specialist in obscure dts- 
■i Alii I eases, comes to the aid of the Seward family and 
II UUl * \ Lucy's fiance Jonathan Marker. 

^ — s Suspecting a vampire bile, the doctor uncovers 

Count Dracula as the vampire. Audience members 
can expect to experience thrills and chills as they "creep" through the 
campus to the outdoor "graveyard" at the lakcfront for the final 
scene. Seward, Van Hclsing and I larker will search the grounds for 
the infamous vampire and his liar, making a breathtaking discovery 
at the lake. 

Cist members include: from Lake Geneva, Jim Hay as Dr. Van 
Hclsing and Glenn Norgrcn as Dr. Seward; and from Whitewater, Phil 
Williamson as the infamous Count Dracula. 

Other cast members include: Julie Beroukas of Lake Geneva as 
Lucy Seward; Dustin Williamson of Whitewater as Jonathan Marker; 
John Kelly of FJkhorn as R.M. Rcnflcld, a sanitarium patient; Shana 
Beroukas of Lake Geneva as the maid Miss Wells; 
and Dave Dietrich of 
Walworth as the at- 
tendant Buiterworth. 
The show begins 
daily at 7:30 p.m. It is 
considered suitable 

for most ages. Parents Beroukas) 
should use discretion during re- 

hersal for 
umpcoming 
Crimson Twi- 
light performing 
arts series pre- 
sentation at George 
Williams Lake Geneva 
campus in Williams Bay. Perfor- 
mances are 7:30 p.m. Friday 
through Sunday, Oct. 22-24.— 
Photo submitted by Aurora Uni- 
versity 



Dracula (Phil 
Williamson) 
finds another 
victim Lucy 
Seward (Julie 




regarding attendance 
by very young chil- 
dren. Tickets are S 12 
foradultsandSlOfor 
children or seniors. 
Due to limited seat- 
ing and the show's 
popularity, tickets of- 
ten sell out. Recom- 
mendations are rec- 
ommended. Tickets 
and reservations can 
be obtained by phon- 
ing 4 14-245-8580 ( or use the new area code 262) Monday through 
Thursdays 8 a.m.-8 p.m. and Fridays 8 a.m.-l p.m. Visa and master- 
card are excepted .—By Michael H. liabicz 



Ninth annual Halloween event opens October 9 



As autumn waves her dreary 
hand and gloomy skies darken 
the landscape, Six Flags Great 
America undergoes its annual 
transformation for its month-long 
Halloween extravaganza, Fright 
Fest. The Midwest's largest Hal- 
loween party opens October 9, 
featuring Looncy Tunes Spooky 
Town, an expanded entertain- 
ment area for children. Also new 
for the event's ninth season are 
Serpent Safari, an educational ex- 
hibit of giant snakes and reptiles; 
the return of the super-bizarre 
Horror Circus, and a new haunted 
house, Brutal Planet. 

During Fright Fest, Six Flags 
Great America takes on a new aura 
and "attitude" wrought by thou- 
sands of props, facades, decora- 
tions and special effects that 
change the 100-acre theme park 



into a spectacularly creepy autumn 
festival. Every aspect of the Park 
changes for Fright Fest, when hun- 
dreds of ghouls, monsters, street 
performers and zombies provide 
fright at every turn. Special enter- 
tainment for both children and 
adults varies from educational to 
hilarious to mysterious. The usual 
collection of thrill rides and roller 
coasters combines with these ex- 
tensive theatrical effects, special 
Halloween-related shows and at- 
tractions, haunted houses and 
characters to create an all-encom- 
passing Halloween experience for 
all ages. 

Fright Fest will be heralded by 
the late-September arrival of Tiny, a 
40-foot inflated spider that perches 
on the latticework of the American 
Eagle roller coaster along Interstate 
94. 




t 
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s 

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£ 

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The cast of characters involved 
in the Six Rags Great America 
Fright Fest. 




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October 8, 1999 



i 



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FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B5 



'Three Kings' bears the gift of a good movie 



Director/writer David 0. 
Russell takes a shot at the 
rare Gulf War genre and 
scores a direct hit with 
Three Kings. 

The movie starts off In the mid- 
dle of a celebration marking the end 
of the conflict In Iraq In 1991. Dur- 
ing a routine inspection of Iraqi 
prisoners, Sergeant Troy Barlow 
(Mark Wahlberg) and Private Con- 
rad Vig (Spike lonzc) find a map 

sticking out from a body cavity of a 
prisoner. 

Barlow and Vig then take the 
map to Chief Elgin (Ice Cube) to try 
and decipher its meaning. When 



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SHOWTIMES FOR 10/8 THRU 10/14 



BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWSBEFORE 6PM 

INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



SIXTH SENSE (po-13) 

FRI 4:30. 7:00. 9:30 SAT & SUN 2:00, 4:30, 
7:00, 9:30 MOM-THUR 4:30. 7:00 



DRIVE ME CRAZY (pg-i3| 
FRI 5:00, 7:30 10.00 SAT 4 SUN 2:30, 5:00 
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FRI 4:20. 7:10. 10:00 SAT 4 SUN 1:30. 
4:20, 7:10, 10:00 MON - THUR 4:20.7:10 



THREE KINGS m r>gitai 
FRI 4:25. 5:00. 7:00. 7:30. 9:30. 10:00 SAT & 
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10:00 MOM-THUR 4:25, 5:00, 7:00, 7:30 



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l FRI 5:10, 7:35, 10:00 SAT & SUN 2:45. 
5:10, 7:35, 10.00 MON-THUR 5:10, 7:35 



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FRI 4:25, 6:55. 9:20 SAT 4 SUN 2:00, 4:25, 
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FRI -SUN 4:35, 7:15. 9:50 
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FRI 5:10, 7:20. 9:30 SAT 4 SUN 3:00, 5:10, 

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movie review 




Rob Backus 



Vh'&h&K&H 




■ 



Major Archie Gates (George 
Clooney), just two weeks from re- 
tirement, gets wind of the map's ex- 
istence, he and the other three sol- 
diers conspire to steal the gold from 
Saddam Hussein, who stole it from 
Kuwait 



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INSPECTOR GADGET (PG) 

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THE IRON GIANT (PG-13) 

['1:40 '4:20] 7:00 9:10 

THE HAUNTING (PG-13) 
1*1:30 '4:15] 7:20 1O00 

MYSTERY MEN (PG-13) 
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SH0WTIHE5— FRIDAY, OCT. B 
THRU THURSDAY, OCT. 14 

DOUBLE JEOPARDY* m 

DIGITAL 

Fri 5:05 7:75 9:45 

Sat/Sun 12:30 2:45 5:05 7:25 9:45 

Mon/Wed 12:30 2:45 5:05 7:25 

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RANDOM HEARTS* m] 

DIGITAL 

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Sat/Sun/Mon/Wed 1:30 4:50 BOO 

SIXTH SENSE (pc.>i 

Fri 5:15 7:35 935 

Sat/Sun 12:20 2:40 5:15 7:35 9:55 

Mon/Wed 12:20 2:40 5:15 7:35 

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THREE KINGS* w 

Fri 5:10 7:40 10:05 

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"Saddam stole it from Kuwait, I 
have no problem stealing it from 
Saddam" said Gates. 

During the subsequent search of 
an Iraqi village, they see the mis- 
treatment of Iraqi rebels, who were 
left to hang by George Bush and the 
U.S. Armed Forces. 

There is then a moral conflict 
over whether the four men should 
take the gold and run, or stay back 
to help the rebels. 

This film has a very effective 
blend of action, comedy and drama. 

In a rarity, the action isn't gratu- 
itous. It actually serves a purpose. 
The action is the antagonist that 
keeps the rest of the movie going. 
Without the action, this movie 
would have been about 45 minutes 
long. 

The comedy becomes very ef- 
fective by using character humor 
and clever cut-aways to the sol- 
diers' lives back in America. The 
character humor was mostly pro- 
vided by Vig (Jones) who played an 
insecure, moronic southerner 
whose "day job" was blasting 
stuffed animals off the top of an 
old car with a shotgun. 

Although it is part action and 



part comedy, the drama is perhaps 
the strongest and most effective 
part of Three Kings. The moral 
dilemma that occurs when the four 
soldiers witness the torture and 




Ice Cube stars in 'Three Kings,' 
an action movie with a moral 
play. 

atrocities toward the rebels is both 
stimulating and shocking. 

Another dramatic scene 
comes during the interrogation of 
Barlow by an Iraqi loyalist. When 
the soldier describes the suffering 
he goes through because of the 
U.S. bombing of his home, Barlow 
appears to be horrified- Indeed so 
was I. 

The most riveting part of this 
movie had nothing to do with the 
plot— it was the cinematography, 
which deserves an Academy Award. 



Three Kings 

Rated R 

Directed by: 

David O. Russell 

Starring: 

George Clooney 

Mark Wahlberg 

Ice Cube 

Spike Jonze 

Nora Dunn 



The slow-motion camera work dur- 
ing the battle scenes was superb as 
were the scenes in which they show 
what the human midsection looks 
like while being ripped apart by a 
bullet. 

The Oscar hype for this movie is 
not unfounded. Three Kings will 
certainly get some nominations, 
most likely for cinematography and 
best picture. Then again, a lot can 
happen between now and early Feb- 
ruary, when nominations will be re- 
vealed. 

I give Three Kings four and a 
half out of five popcorn boxes. 



THEATRE REVIEW 



High-steppin' 'Fosse' a flamboyant show 



Bob Fosse died in 1987 but 
the award-winning dancer, 
director and choreographer 
left behind a brilliant legacy. 
In Fosse, choreographed by 
Chet Walker and Ann 
ReinkJng and directed by 
Richard Maltby Jr. and Reinking, 
Fosse's distinctive style is faith- 
fully re-created, The production, 
at Chicago's Ford Center for the 
Performing Art through Dec, 5, 




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stars Riva Rice and Linda Bowen 

and features Terace 

Jones, Julio Monge 

and April Nixon. 

They, and 23 cast 

members, put on a 

terrific show/ 

Dance num- 
bers — some ener- 
getic and intricately 
involving, others 
lumbering but full of 
soul — are culled form 
Broadway musicals 
such as TliePajama 
Game, Damn Yankees and How 
to Succeed in Business Without 
Really Trying to Sweet Charity, 
Chicago ana Cabaret. 

Throughout the fast-paced 
three -act show, Chicago-born 
Fosse's signature moves are very 



fcU I 



'Fosse' featuring 
Reva Rico (center) 
In 'Bye, Bye Black- 
bird/ 



and the drip to the slouch and 
tea cup hands in 
which the white- 
gloved performers 
nattily tip their hats. 

/Gofc/wi,ahot 
number form Liza 
with a Z, sizzles. 

In Mr. Bojangles 
(from Daticiri) .Monge 
puts his heart Into the 
doleful song about a 

sown-and-out-travcl- 
ing dancer, performed 
by Casse/ Miles along 
wfth /ones as a spirit dancer. 
Fosse builds to a rousing finale 
with some fine stepping to Ben- 
ny Goodman's Sing, Sing, Sing 
But there's aJso plenty ofmo- 
mentum in Rich Man's Frug for 
Sweet Charity. Ticket informa- 



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LAKELIFE 



October 8, 1999 



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Here she il a SWF, 35. 5'4\ a shapely, blue ey a ' blonde who 
enpys movies, muse, Curing out. sports and outdoor a d vtos 
Her doice will be a inm, at hW SWM. 30-40. who shares nor 
bva ol annuls and is interested in Irwrttshp Adl 7094 

ALL WE NEED 
Honest . ewgotc SWF, 37, 5 '6*. 1 1 Obs . wl h dart bbrot har, 
who Uuh boating, biking and spondWo ime with lanvty, is 
bolung lor a seare, honest SWM. 35-4$, lor a pOSSCJo long- 
term rata lonshp Adl 9779 

A MAGNETIC ATTRACTION 
Fnondsho u foremost on the rrind ol Iris warm, caring DWPF, 
57, peUo, slender, with brown ha' and blue ryes, who enjoys 
go* , rrusc. da rang, and sprfod oonvorsalcn Her doca wil 
be a good tufuved. ctopendablt SWM. 5049. with similar 
intoresis Adl 1945 

A NEW WORLD 
This physically f* SWF, 42. 5'6*. 165bs . with brown hair and 
eyes, is ISO a wen educated, aSodonate SWM. 4255. who 
shares her interests n baW, dasscal muse movies, tjnng 
out. waiting and more Could you be hm? Adl 864? 

OUTGOING 
Laugh and enjoy Mo wi h this green-eyed brunette SWF, 36, 
H'S. non-drinker Her interests include cxoking. movies. 
music, horseback noVg and dnmg out, and she socks an 
advertLrous. lunbvjng SWM. 35-50. w<h whom to share 
these ifings and more Ada 6005 

LOOKING FOR LOVE 
DWF. 45, 56*. 1B5t>s . attracWe and phvscalry H, a teacher 
w4h on* chdd and dryerso nterestl is soekjnfl a SWM, 4055. 
tot luri, passioa companon^iip. Inondsho, and a bng term 
letatonsr^ M.9EM 

GOAL ORIENTED 
Fun, humorous SWF. 25. 5'3", 130bs. wth brown hair and 
green eyes, enjoys movies, dnira out, swronng, and plapng 
voUoytMl SheaseokmflalinSWM. ?S-30, wiriMmtafrtfy- 
asts Ada 79?6 

SOMEONE UKE YOU 
Attractive, hiimyous SWPF, 47, petite, a taje-eyed bbnde 
who bves Ihe outdoors and danong, is ISO an attractive, 
humorous, adive. SWPM. 39-49. waft strong values a that's 
you. cal her Adl 7074 

FORD ' 
Tins attract™, enga^ng DWF, 45. pette. is an avid gofer, 
and a ISO a successJuC active, fun-loving SWM, 40-00. who 
Ues gotdng. travel, culttral actrrties. water sports and bicv- 
ckng Adi MS? 

RADIANT GLOW 
Fncnds say ttv\ a sweei, kjnd and honesl SWF, 45, 5T, 
I35fcs , wsh autium hair and tu/et eyes, thats a leal treat to 
spend lime with She kkas music, cocLng, roadog. and seeks 
a r.errpji'b'o SWM. 44-55, lor a possible retalionship 

PRESCRIFTtON FOR ROMANCE 
So ond a Mile l»me wdh her. ihs warm, Inenrty SWF, 75, 5'5*, 
150tjs . with blonde hair an) blue eyes She ikes rurvfcnnn 
got. lemi and hopes lo meet a similar SWM. G5-05 
M328S 

CONTACT ME 
Corrpassionale SWF, 46. 5 5*. iCfcrs , wuh it,', hair and ha HI 
eyes, who Ikes danemg. muse and long walks, rs irterestod r 
moetrg a SWM. 45-00. lor cornpanenlrc- Adl 7449 

ACCOMPUSHED 
Furvtovmrj SWF. 7 1 . 5'9", with dark bkinde ha * and blue eyes. 
who eryoys sports. Fronting lime with Inonds and more, is 
looking tor a canng sum, &30. lo go out and tiave a good 
lime with Ada 4169 

COULD LEAD INTO MORE 
Dul you wont know unless you call IUs attractive, humorous 
SWF. 65. 57", I ?»to . wth toddishWonJe har arvj blue eyes. 
WS, who crifjys oVtng out. travel, movies, aril romartc 
ovornnos. socks a simlar SWM. 00^9 Adl 7151 

SHOW ME AROUND 
Shy-at-lirst SWPF, 24. 5'4". wan dark brown hair/eyes, an 
employed student, who enjoys roadng and playing sports, is 
ISO a SM. 20-29. who Ikes leveling, lo go out with, ari] devel- 
op a iru.-'Wo and more Adl 6953 

NOT TOO LATE 
Attractive SWF, 30, 5'4*. I05bs . with blonde hatf and blue 
eyes, win enjoys £nmg out. dandnu and billiards, would tko 
to meet a lun-loving. romantc SWM 25-39. who has a good 
sense ol humor Adl 5426 

COMFORTING 
Ttis humorous SWF, 39, 57". I72bs , wth brown eyes, who 
enjoys writing, swimning and traveling, is seeking a SWM. 
who snares simitar interests Adl 5046 

CARING AND HONEST 
Easygoing SWF, 40. 5', I05«js, NTS. wtth brown hairreyes. 
who enjoys llarloys. t>ko ndna cooking, and muse ts ISO a 
SWM. 35-40, 5 7 plus, lor Inendshp first Adl 3322 

GENTLE LADY 
FuS-ligured SWF, 54. 5"2*. wuh sal and pcppc* hair and brown 
eyes, who enjoys doing, dancing, shows, fans, and flea rnar- 
Ms. seeks an outgoing, caring SV/M, to share logelt«mess 
Adl 3917 

UFE, LOVE & LAUGHTER 
This honosi. pretty SWF. 22. ST. I40fjs. a Wuo-eyaij 
brunctlo, is an oasygoing romanlc who enjoys sports, movies, 
oving out. and king walks Are you Ihe handsome, smears 
SWM. 20-29. who can make hor laugh? Ada 8620 

CLASSY LADY 
Very alvadivrj, slender and pehta SWJPF. 45. 5T, 125t»s, 
with blonde hair and brown eyes, is searching lor an educat- 
ed, randsome SWM, 40-50. IwS. who enjoys raluro, canping, 
ihe theatre and more Adl 9003 

NO FUN ALONE 
A good conmunicalor, this slim, altradNe SWPF. CO. 5'4\ who 
enoys lilo. Incnos, cuttural events, history, movies, reading, is 
ISO a SWM lor Inondship. possaVy more Adl 2714 

WORTH A TRY 
This swoot, sinceta SWF. 39. 55", 175*0*-. with red hair and 
bbo-groen eyes, a siudent, who enjoys rrusc, the outdoors, 
and animals, is looking lor an adventurous, intelligent 
SW/VVNAM, under 47, wth slmiar Iriefosls- Ada 0065 

COMFORTING 
Shy at Iks', this rwoct SHF. 35, 5'4*. 1G0*». wiih brown 
hair/oyos. who enjoys fishing, cooking and movies, is interest- 
ed In mooting a nee SHM. 28-40, to spend qualify lime wih 
Adl 2541 

NO FREE RIDES 
SW mom, 42, 5'3", Hubs , who enjoys fishing, reading and 
movies, is socking a (unloving, easygoing SWM, VyAf, who 
has a good sense ol humor. Adl 3607 

START OFF SLOW 
Fun-loving, caring SAF, 21, 5*9*, with brown hair and green 
eyes, who enjoys painting and drawing She's bokinglor a 
klvj, sincere. Konust SM Adl 7329 



A MATCH MADE IN HEAVEN 
Bubbly, lun-toving. college-going SWF, 19, 5'5*. 120bs , wUh 
curV brown hair and btuo eyes, a stutort, who enjoyi sports. 
wa!c!>ng movies, and going out. is locking tor a talkative SWM, 
19-73, who likes to go out and have a good lime AWDOat 

INSPIRED? 
This sweet, emplcryod SWF, 24, 5", 130*os , with rod hair and 
brown eyes, disabled, onjoys movies, shopping, dancing and 
museums, is looking lor a eating, honest SWM, 2425. lo spend 
qua^y time wtth Ada 3372 

GET AWAY FROM IT ALL 
Country music, animals and Ilea -markets are jus) a few mer- 
est! IUs humorous SWF, 55, 4" IT, petit, with brown hair.'eyes 
She's ISO a spontaneous SWM. 50-00 Adl 5795 

GET IN TOUCH 
She's a SWPF, 28. with brown harfeyes, who Ikes tennis, danc- 
ing, being with friends, and watching movies, and seeks a SWM. 
26-32, lo go oul and do things wth Adl 5953 

QUALITY TIME 
Blonde and green-eyed, this Mfigurod SWF, 31. S'5", who 
enjoys movies, fishing and going lor car dmes. is looking tor a 
sincere, tones SM. 78-40 Adl 8882 

MAKE A LOVE CONNECTION 
Dig hearted, affectionate SWF. 41. 235tcs. with brown 
hair.'eyes. a smoker, enpys heath dubs, sports, movies, dart- 
ing ard much more Sho wants lo buld a rotatonshci w4h an 
honest. do»-Ho-earth, opon-mnued SWM Ada i?fi? 

DYNAMIC 
Upbeat SWF, 31. ST, a fJi f^-od. blue^yod brunette, who 
enjoyi hor work, concerts, muse, movies and drag out. is 
seeking a rosponsble. lun-bving SWM. 27-45 Adl 6300 

SENSUOUS SOUL MATE 
Ths playful, pretty, provccaDva. honest, upbeat, cortsderate, 
afledcnati, rod-hoaded SWPF, 52, seeks an active, fun- loving. 
generous, romanlc welt-p^oomed. degrood DWPM. f*S. 46- 
56. lor iheator. mennes, dnirtg, laughter, ivmg and having 
Adl 8992 



SOMEONE JUST UKE YOU 
Atiractivo, young4ookrvj, oottoge -degrood SWF. 42, S'H\ wih 
bkydo hair and blue eyes, enpys working out. sports movies 
and navrjiing. seeks a dukfess, secure, rj. U'S SWTM. 34-48. 
over 6*, witn vmlar norests. lor a ITFt leading lo mamago 
Adl 4037 

LOOKING FOR ROMANCE 
Avoryadrve and energete gal, this SWF, 1B,5'8*. H5*cn. wth 
bbnde hair and brown eyes. Ikes oartong. rrusic. tearing, fish- 
ing and more tl yaCra a roma me SWM, 2 1 -28, and We what 
you see, kuve hor a messaga today Ada 5436 

PERFECT CHEMISTRY 
ft you kka leading, music, moms and sports, you have a lot m 
common with hor, this attentive, furvlowvj and sirtcora DWPF, 
44, 57". wKh brown harr/eye* Sfa's lopmg you're a dassy 
SWM, 44-55. who knows how 10 treat a lady Ml 1206 

ARE YOU LISTENING? 
SW mom, 29, 53'. modtjm buM. a gomoous green-eyed 
bkyvJe. warts to ind a man wth whom she can share a won- 
derful Irvjndsh*) wth An rfeltgert. considerate, handsome 
SWM, 30-38. stoukj cat mrwMiily Ada 6918 

HAPPY ENDINGS 
Just your type, mod this upbeat. posrtrvo-rr»rdod SWF, 39. 5'5', 
aunty curvacouus. wdh dark, drairatc good looks, wto warts 
to tn) (hat speoal guy. a lai, husay sv.xt 35-50. actrvryy 
mvxAed in sports, ptaymg pool, fishing and lh« outJiot 
AJIIB15 

BE HONEST WITH ME 
Passionate, personable SHF, 34, 57. 165lbs. with daik 
hair/eyes, is looking for a sincere, caring SWM, 40 -50. who ad I 
Uo an adu" Sh* krves the outdoors, yard work. paikS tM 
movies Adl 4189 

MUST LOVE CHILDREN 
Very pretty, lun living SB mom. 29. 57" .wth brown har and 
eyes, is socking a spontaneous, honesl SM. 30-42. Uj a LI li 
She orfiys cooW travel, sports, SpencVng «ne wth her tfrf- 
ditn and more Adi 9118 

GOD BLESS YOU 
Canng fin, pretty SWF. 59, wth brown hair and Wot tyot 
tmpt\ (Wig out concerts, and t/avcrVig. s ISO a SWM, 55- 70. 
wth simrfjr rtociKJi Ada 2975 



'--Vk 



* ,v% ' .Males 

SeeWnglremaless^; 



1-900-896-5999 



■' WIN A CRUISE TO NASSAU/BAHAMAS 




Mace your FREE ad ^ J* 00 i> 

arc auloniatkally entered! 

- Current adi also q u a 1 1 fy ! 

Postcard entries accepted. 

Sec details belovr. 

Airfare not Included. 



iditB&fc 



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Enipicrj-us of LlllMl IS, Carnival Cruisdine utaJ punJdpatinj; nevtspupen arc not dipblc. 

Wuwm will b» nolifWd la Uwir iei« nvilbai ar by nail. Vm may •!*• loir r by wodix | ■ fmtttri Ui 

Uirrtl Rnponx Marin. laf.lU.S-). Inc., US I HrhrV [Jnu.W illunai ilk, Nt» Vtri 1 4IJI , pmtimtiri t» lata r tku 

Ortabtr 21, HJ9. IhIimU iKi un aftW paprr nhtir }•« i»» aur tatumti a* ywir pattftrd. 



ALWAYS CHEERFUL 
She's an easygoing, enptoyod WWrVF. 46. 5T, merJum buid, 
wth blonda hat its green eyes, ?i"S. who eraoys walking. 
rTov%es.t<yctnp,finrigoui and addling Cal today* you're a 
tovmg. oorrnitrrienl-mndod SWM. 40-55: 6*. Ada 6705 

WORK OF ART 
Hi/norous SWF, 61. S'5', wdh brown har and haroJ ayes, wto 
enjoys ioj-iiig. spenckrvj tme with fr«rds and mora, is socking 
a fun loving, educated SWM, 54-08, f^S. to go out and have a 
gnod lime wth Adl 2520 

QUIET NATURE 
Outgoing, gorfte SWF. 46, 5'8", wto crY3ys photography, cook- 
ing and movies, is ISO a Sircere. oJjcmg SWt^. urdor 58. wth 
suntai tterests. lor a monoganrous rctatunstaj Ada 1546 

THE PRIME OF UFE 
Delightful, unoretentixis OWPF. 56, 5'6". 150bs . wth roddah- 
brown tat. wno erwys bowtng. pliymg cards, muse, dancing, 
movies, theater aru anytlw] lo do w.'.ti a* walor. a seoknn an 
oasygoaig. humorous SWM. 50-63. H'S Ad» 1/47 
AS CLOSE AS YOUR PHONE 
Get to know Itirs SW mom. 25, 5T, a slupoty. Uuo-ey od bferde 
wto oiyjy s niisc, reackngand walks onlhebeach,seeksasin- 
ccro 5M. 243'J. rterosted m stianng a rrutualY rcwardng roll- 
tenstap Adl 57G2 

CAN YOU RELATE? 
She s a Inencfy SW mom, 78, S'4*. medium buiil with dark 
bbrdc tiair and blue eyes Fsrrkry-corierod, she is ISO a simi- 
lar nmdod. H'S, SWM 25-35, wth a sense d adrenlu-» and 
lun Adi 7417 

BEST FOOT FORWARD 
Attractive, dynamic, and educated SYrT, 60. wth brown 
hair/eyes, who bvos etwarw jaw rnuse, and nati/a is seeking 
a ccrrrjanerabic. smcere SM. 55-06. lor lnerdsf«p lo*ina lo 
more Ada 4993 

MAKE THAT CALL 
Just wtat you've been looking for a sweet, smcore, tun-t/virij 
SWF, 1 8. wtc onfj y •> muse movies ard being outctors She's 
looking lor a darmng, lal handsomo SWM. 1S-73. to share 
Inendship and good limes Ada 7754 

CLASS ACT 
Lovely, fa and gracious OWPF. 44. *'e enjoys art, computer 
arunaldn. beyclng and eierose, is seeking an arrUous. suc- 
cessful SWM, 37-56. who valies irtegrly Adl 4237 

CHOOSE ME 
Sincere ard mlotin^xt, this Ui SWF. 26. wth slcrt blortoe lia'ir 
and blue e-yes. who tikes tnking. wavng. Wljids. and meottig 
new rioople. is socJung a SWM. 25-32. who is down-to earth 
Ada&iT 

MY TURN 
This affable SWP rnothor ol four, 36, 5'4', 125bs . a smoker, is 
loping to share fun. friendship and common interests wth a 
soaaWo SWPM. 28-46 Adi 2/97 

THE GENUINE ARTICLE 
Adventurous, attradrvo SWF. 29. 5'4', 105 ts . *nth curty long 
brown tat and brown eyes, who tkos sr«w boaroVig, Uking, an 
gatianes, momes and nore, is lookng lor a handsome, smcore, 
athletic SM 27-39, who enyoys lie lo the luttest Ada 9751 

SWEET & PETITE 
Employed DW mollw, 70. 4'll', is seeking a (arriry-orierted 
SV/M, 70-30, wtio erwys movies, picnics, taking walks and 
more Ada 5671 

DONT WAIT ANY LONGER 
She's an easygnirvi gal wto enjoys wa iks, t oadjvj. dancing and 
cooking This SWF, 30, S'4*. 120fbs, with brown hair/eyes, 
seem a secuo, honest SWM, 76-38, who Idujs annuls 
Adi 8390 

MAKE ME LAUGH 
Fun-bving and outgoing, this SAF, 18, 5T, ISObs, wan brown 
hair/eyes, is a sludonl who lies going out wth I nerds, movies, 
and exercising She's socking a witty SM with similar irtorasii 
Ada 5883 

HOLD ON TO YOUR HEART 
Caring, humorous SWF. 63. S'5\ 135ba . wth gray dark 
hair/eyes, who enjoys vokrteenng, long waits, bowling bat- 
room dancing, and i/avetrvj. soou an easygoing, humxous 
SWM, 60-70, wto has stntai Interests Ada 6684 

JUST SAY IT 
Attractive, SWF. 26, I'JOtjs , blonde hair, green eyes, smoker, 
likes biking, camping, fishing and roller blading, hopes to Imd a 
SWM, 25-30 with simlar Interests Adl 6403 

LOOKYHERE 
rm a lurny, employ od SWF. 20, 5'6", 1 40fbs , wtio enjoys social ■ 
inng ard going out to dubs I wouk) love to got in touch with a 
SOM, 19-25 Acll 9707 



SUMMER NIGHTS 
SWF, 51. 57. Hits , wth blonde hat and Uue eyes, enpys 
long walks, dnng out . danong, swvTtnrn aid rrteh mora, a 
tcn-g tor a pai«l, gentle andcanng SWM. under 55. to than 
Ida wth Adl 2593 

DONT HESITATE 
Attractive DW nan. 45. wth btorde har and green eyes, warts 
to find a wo SWM. over 05. ready to share conpanonsfei and 
nutual nlerests Adl 9945 

NOTHING SYvEETER 
Easygoing SWF, 46. 5*3", wthtbrde tar end green eyes, who 



enpys working out. Ovarii muse. tAmg kytg wa\s. end 
swirrmng. is triprig to moot 8 t 
spend trie wth Adl 2133 



swirTmng. is trip™ lo moot a fun-tovng. UI SWM, 40-55, to 



SICK OF BEING SINGLE 
Okie-eyed blonde DWF. 50. 54", not*. a icetag » humor- 
ous, handsome SV/M. 45-65, lo snare Iravet. crxkuvj. airjoo 
ng ard taujllcr Adl 5701 

TAKE A LOOK 
SWF, 42, 6'3*. wth brown has/eyes, who enpys horna nctova- 
mcrt. the outdoors, gardenm. taking walks, nwse ard 6ey- 
Ckng seeks a trustworthy SWM. 38-45 Ada 3425 

HAVE A HEART 
Fua s* od SWF, 28. 5'6", a green-eyed bbrvle. who enpys 
moves cirmg cut ard the ouUjvs. seeks a sonstrve gocd- 
natited SWM 75-35. who bves Ue Adi 7965 

OLD-FASHIONED 
Downlo-aarth SW mom. 44. M-tigurrjd, wth long brown 
haripyos a smcier, wto enpys long dnvos m Ihe country, cook- 
ing. cusIitm aril laaWg hind ri hard, seeks a lamrr-onontetl 
SV/M, 40 -tj. lor hwrjathja trst AJl 6744 

DINNER 8. A MOVIE? 
Smcore kvwvj CM ncm. 52. 55". 175bs. wth auburn far, 
wto crtoys bOwtng, camntfig tong wals and Ihe outdoors, ts 
nevk.T.j a tu'd cn« SVA.I. 41,-05. wth umlai irterests, tor i 
UR Ada 3023 

THE PRIME OF UFE 
Easygoing SWF, 65. *♦« enpys dancrg. rirwid out, travel, 
sports ard more, woud like to meet a compattaa SWM, 05-75 
Ada 0536 

READY FOR A DATE 

Ids bvii^ employed SWF, 78. 5"5". wth bkytJe hat and blue 
eyes, has a '•; /c- itai tiops iratte She enpys muse. cats, 
danong. mivos, srrcUvg. ard scats a lun-kjvmi SWPM. 26- 
36 Ad* 3055 

SEIZE THE DAYI 
AsUjrtryshySWF, 18. 5T. llOfcs. wthbrownharard green 
eyes. lk«s j,u ymj pool and boacti walks St-e warts to moot a 
UMOIM, enptoyod SM. 1825, tor quatry imas together 

GENTLE ON MY MIND 

Tm a warm-hearted, atiradive SAF, 40. 55", ITOtjs, f*S. who 
is bokjng lot a canm aitrxtenata SWM, 39-50. tor a mearwg- 
I J roUlMshc. Aaafibea 

ENJOY UFE 
Personable SVrF, 08, 55", 1 45bs . is searching tor a lurvbvng, 
Iriordfy SWM. r^S, wto enpys onS, dining out, movies ard 
mora Adl 6761 

HEAVEN SENT 
SW mom. 74, 5T. 1 35tis . wth blonde hair and blue eyes, who 
enpys biUurus. bowtmg horseback rvjVo and NASCAR seeks 
a respectiul SWM. 23-35 Adl 2536 

MANY OPTIONS 
Personable, outgoing SWF, 46, wto enjoys movies, board 

Smos, corcorts. (estiva Is, sporting events ard more, is bolung 
1 a SWPM. 45-55. fi'S. who is socue and good-huncired 
Adl 1689 

SHARE UFE 
SWF. 40, wto enjoys naiiie. photography. okJ novios, yoga, 
aniouos and mora, is seeking an open, Inertty SWM, wthom 
d»klon Adi 3609 

EASY TO PLEASE 
Honest, caring, passonala SWF, 45. b&. 200bs , wth brown 
tur/oyes, enpyi i/o outdoors, (wtnrrtnii outdoor corcbrts. 
movies and quml evenings She's ISO a SWM, 45-55, 1 NTS, 
casual drinker Adl 6631 

ROMANCE IS ALIVE 
Loving DW mother, 40. SX lOObs, with brown hair.'eyes, 
seeks a trustworthy SWM 38-43, who enpyi trie outdoors. 
rollcftiLjckng. readrrj. volunteer work ard more Adl 5517 

SUMMER AHARLEY3 
Attractive SWF, 44, 5?. Irom Northwest Infant, enpys outdoor 
edrvtifrs She seeks a handsome, muscular, corciactjon type 
mm, i SWM, 39-49. tor a possible tcialonsho ArJf 9736 



FAMILY-ORIENTED 
Grod bokirvg. cottege-orlraled SWPM. 46. 6T. l95ln.who 
enpys boatrvj. outdoor advtes. dning out. and »*> to U a) 
home) and waKh a nee movie, « ISO »n atvadrvi, snapey 
SWF. under 47, wth nmrtar nteresii Ada 0916 

DONT WAIT 
ThHfiurnorousSWM.20. 6", lOOtjs, wth brown ha rand green 
eyas, wto enpyt pUimg basketbal. sr^erdrvj tma wth Inerdv 
working on cars, and mora. <s boking tor a SWF, 18-72, to go 
cUandhjvaagoodlrnawth Ada 5449 

UP AMONG THE CLOUDS 
Outgoing, tireert SWM. 25. 5'T. wth dark brown hair/eyes. 
wto enpys mov«s. Ulung walks and ikydwig. is teekmg an 
fone-j. pott* SWF, 2124. wthsimUr tntertsta Ad* 3659 

YOUR HERO 
ft'i easY to look up to Inn durmng 5"iVPM, 39. 64*. 3V*s . 
wth t/uwi har and MM eyes He erpys avutorv worturrj out. 
playing guar, (h, thealre. rroines, and seeks a cheertJ. out g> 
rvj SWF; 45 or under Adl S332 

MAKE THE CONNECTION 
An errf-fciyorj stiiloft. tt»s oongemal DW dad el two. 74. 5V, 
IJOtt.t, wth brown har ard FAN eyes, erpys takrvj waSs. 
carrpng. movies, and toais a tweet, ircem SVi*F, X or urder, 
wtoktescfiidren AJl 5009 

TOTHEPOINT 
Never-mamed SWM, 43, who anpys larm cyclrvj and good 
r-ovvas. seeks a realty attraewe SWF. ?3-*3, tor fntrriinp 
and fun Ada 7144 

BEST FOOT FORWARD 

AI«Oi'cer.lt.ivirre'«DrVPM.50.6'4-.215bi,f4Ser>Y> 
til ca'wr, astroncmy. soert/c hterature. a vinery el mjuc 
convcrsatnn. ard setts t tecum, tubie arc] rutMcwrj 5F. 42- 
53. 5T. Ad* 3292 

LOVES UFE 
SWM 45. 67". IJS bt , wth brown har and b«u* ryes, erpys 
the outdoors and quef times, leeking a camg. thtnng. rxan- 
mnckid SWF. 35-50. tor I Inernthb Irst reiltcoiTip AJ* t?M 

ONE ON ONE 
Se* ernr*jyerl phy^caJy |( DViSJ. 46. 58". 13U.S . wth oown 
har and ha/el ryes, who enpys oook-ng. muse. fr« rjrang. 
campm movies and waks, 11 seatong an atodonatt SWAF. 
39-46. tor a LTR Ad* 6074 

GET TO KNOW ME 
Coficgc-degreed SAM, 26. who anpys watchrtg rtcwes. 0*4 
nrJog. and much mora. • ISO* SWF. over 16 Ad* 3347 

HERE'S AN ACH EVER 
Thra quek-wfted and goal<rientte> SWM 73. 5'11". TOObt. 
wth brown hat and huat ay es. * teeUrg 1 SF, 71 -26, to erpy 
btkards. dart*. IdJtng, rtotorcrcitng and mora Mth hm 
Ad* 9146 

THE NEXT MOVE IS YOURS 
Consdertd camg and humorous, thai SWM. 23, 56*. wth 
brown hat and btot ry*s. enpyi hrs wort, sports, rnovvas. and 
readVvj Cal today ajrWraacompatila SWF. 16-26, wth »«r> 
Ur rtaresti Adl 4J13 

YXXJ,T0O7 
Thara'a m trnpfy apaoi ri tn Ha where love and romance 
thoukjb* C*vvwTT^adSVvHW.i'in7?-i*t.wthtari 

brown hair and men (qrsst, N*i wart* to meat that r-padeJSF, 
53 V unda* Ad* 4556 

WELL-EDUCATED 
netted SWM. 60. S'10*. t"5bs. wth btcrtlrwhta hat. love* 
Col. fahria fr* aVwo and cruses r t* s ISO a slandar. pUas- 
art SWF. GO-75. to arpy and spot Adl 7S21 

ON THE SAME WAVE LENGTH 
Tins law-atrptoyid SWPM 40. 6', I96bs . wth agrt brown hair 
and t*» tyts. il taaai-rj a SF. under 45. to anpy aiards*. 
caroong. boaung. tt ort get awtys and mere wth hm Oonl 
(Ml y. cal thts graat guy today Ad* G635 

LOVC IS COLOR BUND 
Frierdty S8M. 4a 67. 220b* . neks a speoal SfOWT. 40-51 
who anpys OVirg out, qukst avanrgs. bng watts. fUl muse. 
ard honebadt nlng Ada 5616 

TOHA^FAJTH 
This runorous and advert urous SWM. 27. git*. ?10bs. wth 
brown hair and hai*t eyas. • aaaajng a SCF. 23-35. to er-py 
aports, reading the BbK. attarrjog dxrdt and mora wth hm 
Could ha ta rJaacrbang you? Ad* 6176 

ITS IN THE STARS 
Oioci J ttrs tartjsrwia SWM, 36. mocUjTi bv-U w.r, bf-.wn 
far 'eyes, wto ts lord ol oUdOOr adM-es and heprn to frd 
tfat speoal gal a sweat, sneers, ey»ttoav>j SWF. 34-39. 
rterostedoalTH A3* 2876 

JUST FOR YOU 
Ha'a a handsom*. bOetysd. btond SW dad. 32. hrv+ovmg and 
rxlgotrj. who warts to snare his rterrtsts n rrDnes. UwSm 
•'■J outdoor adJvttKts wth a sincera, trv/t. and beaiif u* SWF. 
2034, wto is tord ol chidr an Adl 6704 

IT ALL ADOS UP 
Check out Ihs adwtt, coawjadegraad SWM, 78, 58*. 105bs . 
wth red brown hat and atNotc butt Ha'i hoprrj 10 spend 
qjaity time wth a rjoalonerted SBF, 21-36. wto can start fit 
rteresis in sports, trutorcydes, movies. Ckbb-ng and dtvig 

out Ad*43fl6 

MULTI-FACETED 
Play no games win the ftasygoang. erar/ttorwanj SWPM. 31. 
61 . wah tbnd hat Ha enpys outior ecUvt**. levtrvaH, 
muse, and mora, and rs ISO a SWF. under X Ad* 6406 

CHASING SUNSETS 
Thts rotraric SWPM, 50. wto anpys travel, bng wafcs and 
good corwarsalon, rs o scant) ol a hAhgurcd SF, to spend 
quaLty time wth A3* 7794 

SPECIAL DEUVERY 
S . ulr ro ts t*g wth this easygoing, rurtf»«rimg SWM. 48. 
ST, 175fcs, wth brown tar/eyes, and rrtjstadie He also 
enpys bowtng, fishing rorscdack ndng. movies, drvrig out. 
and seeks an adtvt SWF. 43 50 Ad* 1115 
FRIENDSHIP FIRST 
Frieojy SWM. 46. 510". I75bs. wth brown hat and blut 
ayes, wto anjoyl woriung out, swrnrrang and sporting Irre 
wth fnerds, is seeking a U, attractive SWF. 39-47, tor a possi- 
ble tong-torm teuttoftJio Ad* 4419 

YOU WONT BE SORRY 
Chock oJ IM very out 30*0. vory erlhusvaste SWM 24, 6". 
medium bull, gdden brown rat. true eyes, wto is kokng tor 
uat speoal aM. a warm-hoaned SVi"n 18-33, who wants to 
share rvapprtess and tomanca Ad* 3773 

YOU CANT DO BETTER 
Porsoracle DWPM 47. 67. TOO lis . wth brown har ard green 
eyas, wto enpys dning oO. mowos. and irtamatbftal travcJ, rs 
rteroflod in rreetmg a kke mmdod SWF, 35-45 Adl 2012 

CHARISMATIC 
Easygoing, retired SWM. 78. 510*. IBObs, wth gray hat and 
brown eyes, wto enjoys iravdmo darong and soaatnTig. ts 
toobng tor an artedoraie SWF, "5-65 Ad* 2544 
SO MUCH FUN TO BE HAD 
Furvtoving and outgoing, ihs SWPM 56. 5T, I70bs. wth 
Uown har and btoe eyes, whose rteresis retude gardening. 
bovAng and anrratt is hccaig to moot an attractive, honest, 
romanlc SWF. over 42. wth stnilir irterests Ad* 5933 

PICK UP YOUR PHONE 
Known to be a congenial, waimhoanod guy mat eripys swim- 
nma garderung, the theatre, and danong. if us SWM 60, 5' 11", 
185os , wth brown tair/eyes, lepes lo rncel a urilar SAPF, 
u-derOO Ad* 7271 

LOYAL & HONEST 
Tieal yourse* lo a great tme wth hm, the ittjod yet outjprig 
SWM. 05. 6. 200bs . wth grey tar and bbe eyes, who *rpys 
iravotng. drtng out. go*, and mora He's ISO a secure SWF, 
00-65, tor a posstic reaionshp Adl 6374 

LOOK TO THE FUTURE 
Say hello to Ihis lurry, Incasing SWM. 46, 510", !90bs . wth 
brown hair and green ayeat. today lit enpys rnotorcydoa ha 
oogs, the outdoors ana seeks an honest, wca-oducaiod SWF, 
under 48, for a ITR Adl 6633 

SERIOUS ONLY 
WWHM, 45, seeks a LTR wth an honest, stxoxt SWF, under 
47, to enjoy dinng out, darting, and walks by the lake 
Adl 4772 

HOPEFUL FvOMANTIC 
TafL physeaffy ft SWM, 39. dark har and hueJ eyes, who 
enpys workpg on cars, rrotorcyoa riles, moonU waAs and « 
tockng a Inertly SWF. Adl 9652 



LEAVE YOUR NUMBER 
SAM 31. SW. I35bs. dart har am green eyes wtrj ts 
Ir^rxfy and enpyi mrnnos, readirrj. natural t**i*y, m «<k 
r*3anhrjri«si.kTvrigSF.2l-38 Ad* 3772 

BEST THERE IS 
(>// «•} SW dad 32. IT. wth btond ha* ard but r, tv 
wto anpys ihe outdoort a lookjrig lor a h/vtov/ig SWF, 76- 
36 wto Um ctrtven. tor a pcrssarAa long term reatcrtano 
Adl 4,87 

IN SEARCH OF YOU 
ItuTorous SWM. 46. ST. ISita; wih ttorrf hat and but 
eyes, wto "anjoyl gardenrvg. campirtj. canoemg and mora, is 
tookrig tor a buury. teoest SF. »*-/r and wergr I prrrartorv 
aia. a^unrtportant, wih a sarn* of hurtw Ad* 47/4 

UNTIL NOW 
Altltt c errr^red "iYrV. 46, 6', 1 75bt . Mh brown ha#. who 
orpys kog waVs. (Vang out and raadann i la i tooiro tor a 
Inendty, hurtorous SF. under 55 Adl 9060 

FEEL AT EASE 
Cugorg SWM, 31, 6, 170bt. wth brown hatfayci. who 
laan SPartVrg lrm wth Inondt, beating and ptayvrj gnl, it 
s««*jng a tun-tovng SWF, 25-35. who Uuaa to go oU and 
tavt a gnod tm* Ad* 3636 

ATTRACTIVE TEACHER 
SWM. 76. 6', 1 / 5lt , wto erpys good convenatwn, physi- 
cal faness. rtoviei oomarjy. pUyrvj pool lams, ct^asa, 
spenv me outdcorL romamc rtoortt wait, an] cp* txnti 
seeks a SWF. under 39. tor a tongierm retatonsho 
Adl 6643 \ 

MAKE IT WORK 
A^arti/out SWM. 25. 5T. I50bl. who arwyl tootUI. 
sr/Ea1an3pUy-«3pciul Ito'tlroka-igtoriSYlr^undar 30 to 
UtrtJhmewth Ad* 6013 

GIVEMEACALL 
Has i rjeparr-abk* SWM. 43, 57, rnartum tM*i wth brown 
har and hi/el tyet »*o enpys aports. dasse rock music. 
ardUlungwatu Sr>anrrgtrWtJe*icandrTUualrlanssUMh 
a curtdent. rxrrpattae SWF. 35-45, « what tas "xping tor 

SOCTTHWEST SUBURBS 
Tr«s vary eflacforv/le SWM 45. t . a a rerneownar wth ro 
ekr*rrs«rti who tj atso ir\ anraJ and nat^e bvtr Mas (SO 
a &DF, age urwnportart Al cats ral xnoj Ad* 6*61 

TOOETHERNESS 
A'adonat*, om gong SWM, 46. 166ba . wth back fair vd 
brown eye*, who arpys grjlro movas and danorq tw I h 
search of a sweat, snewt SWF. under 51 Adl 266* 

LETSBECANOID 
Gar/uty arrpfcrrad. "hra muaiadad SYtM. 45. 5T, Uflbl. 



«*) 'ar.'ayav bvM Vara!, ruidanm movat, ttxt 
rVvvpoul He 'i botdng lor ■ 5^ j5 50. bf frardahrj 

NEW HORIZONS 
E aiy to gat abng w*A thn hurroroui SWPM. 29. 6", 1 60ba . 
wth brown haw and Uua -am |«ti| a corrpattJa SPF 21- 
35. tor cenrjan o nat a j Ha U« canarig. fjmm out. nuvw*. 
and -arti to meet you Ad* 5617 

LOOQWG FOR YOU 
SWU, ,11, 5*1 1* 1 65t» wth brown haareyat. wgongwth 
agc«'*ansac'humc*,aartpe7«d*ndia«riarCTo wort- 
rg on canj ard ipardng ime wan ha "nerds HeakxJuro 
tor a lattrj. pratry SWF Ad* 2597 
^ HELLO SUNSHNE 

Shy SOU 19, 5T, wth brown eyas, wno arpyt sponi and 
^^J^ m *4^ rHT «l« SWF. to -part) guilty ttia 

SET UP A DAY TO MEET 
FimySWU. 18,6". l*Obt, wthrjkvdharand o-eonryai 
tnal : anpyt pWymg gucar ard aoarrjro im« wih irvanda. 
aa^an ougr*^ cnatismateSwF. 16-22. tor toerdtrx) 

FEELATEASE 

Hunorous. ktd and caring this SWPM, 49, 51 V. isiii , 
wth rtddah brown har anfrAa eyas, wto enpyi biro. he. • 
rrj. and waldwig movaa. s ISO an tonest, srxart, roman- 
lc, rjparwnrrJtcf pauta SWF, under 51. tor a rrurcoarroue 
reUtooshp Adl 7212 

FOCUS HERE 
Emptoyad. Nanorous SHM. 36. 57. 122bl. brown 
hatffyat, who anpyt invar, doing out. and mors, a bctung 
tor an awidrvt. patai SWF. 18<B. wth tM *yts Ad**6« 

HEAR ME OUT 
SW dad b one. 56. 57. ITObs , wtti brown hair, but ayes 
and a bean], tnprs go*, towing board/card games, 
gaum*) cookra inrj rorranca Has tocaang lor a tt, aBne> 
wa SWF, uroof 35 Ad* 6502 

BE PREPARED 
You/1 han tots ol inarasu to ahare wth tm Mrsonabw. 
^xdbcAng. SWM 44. StOT. U'Anm. back har. brown 
ryes wt« s rcprrj to get bgttntr wth ■ Wey artnusiasic 
SvvT. jt, 43 itady to share tetve/ture and ttcaarrart. 
Ad* 6428 

HEART OF GOLD 
I tanjsor-a SWPM 44. 64", wtti brown har/tyts. who arnpys 
spurts, jcoxo. n.Yvi and go*, sacks an oJcpto. baauUv* 
SVrF, M -It Adl 7355 

GREAT DISPOSITION 
1 ha ltd back SWM 44. 510*. I35M. wth brown har ard 
Wue ayes, anprs r« wort, iwiajfrttnl parts, rj*, bowing, 
bcyctng. u* ouUoin. and he I r»/o tor a petit, camg 
SWF. 3*46, tor a posstaa LTR Adl 5127 

FUN-LOVING 
ArtrtdM SWV. 76 67. 720bs . wth short red ha* and 
broarn eyes. Uas »ir>j out. mountain bturjg. turo ard 
wa«a runrwvj Ha'i kiAng tor a ocrpattia. posfve SWF, 
wto knows wtat sra waru Adl 0667 

OREAT CATCH 
Adwt. »vi and rorrartc DtnVM. 4). 5 10*. 163ba. arch 
brown harffyev wto erpys drrars out. dancro ard Ml. 
seeks a Ccrrpa'Wa SWF, 4043. lor a pontile LT l( Adl 7&W 

MUCH TO OFFER 
(tumorous SWPM. 4*. 510*. ITTtos, wth brown ha* ard 
btoe eyes, who enpvs tports. dra^j cut and al k/ils ol 
rrusc seeks an anractmt. %kn SF Adi 4t£3 

JUST AROUND THE CORNER 
New in town, tt>s SWM 33. 5 tl*. 2lQbs, wth brown tar 
ard green eyes, pia/t tt* guU' and U*s to cook tt* waru 
to meet a SF, 1S-4S. **o erpys <u,-.- ) .i-.j \> the beach 
and wninrij new ttrrgs All 9630 



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To itnew, change, cancel or ask any guasucms. cal out 
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October 8, 1999 



KIDS KORNER 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B 7 



Food Fact: 



FINLAND ISiil^XOP 
COFfflE-l 



Rids 9 Crossword 



CLUES ACROSS 

l.Fire 

5. Relating to numbers 

6. To make wet 
GLUES DOWN 

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4. Tom Cruise or Brad 
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Answers 

jojov'fr 1SUM*£ buioiv'Z puno-n jojba/v'9 ouaumN'S aurefcTt 

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How they SAY it in. . . 



English: GRASS 

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Italian: 



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French: HERBE 

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October 8, 1999 



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ADVERT ISIMENT 




Jesse Oaks 




Location: 

On two wooded acres at 18490 W. Old Gages Rd„ Cages Lake 

Telephone: 

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Hours: 

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Mondays-Kitchen open for lunch 

Monday nights-Pizza half price 

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I lomernadc pizza, prime rib, BBQ ribs, hamburgers, fresh fish, 

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AtDesse Oaks, 

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For comfortable and casual family dining at its best, and 
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NTNQB1 Monday Football league. 

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B10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



FALL HOME & GARDEN 



Octobers, 1999 






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FALL 

99 



Shopping for windows? Here's what to look for and what to watch 

w 



indows play air integral role in 
home construction and remod- 
eling projects. They can im- 
prove a home's energy efficien- 
cy, enhance a home's architectural design and 
provide essential dnylighting. . 

Window-shopping, however, can be a try- 
ing time for some consumers, especially con- 
sidering the maze of choices, widely varying 
price ranges and conflicting sales pitches. Ex- 
perts at Andersen Windows, Inc., America's 
leading brand of windows and patio doors, of- 
fer consumers these window-shopping tips to 
simplify the process: 

• Work with trained window experts. 
Trained window experts will help you under- 
stand a window's performance, answer ques- 
tions about energy efficiency, and provide 
sound advice about remodeling projects. 

• Choose high-quality windows with a re- 
liable warranty. 

What a customer sales representative 
promises and what a warranty's fine print 
promises may be two different things. Win- 
dows are only as good as the warranty that 
comes with them. Andersen Windows pro- 
vides a 20-year warranty on glass and a 10- 
year warranty on parts that is non-prorated 
and fully transferable should you sell your 
home giving homeowners ah additional bar- 
gaining tool. 

• Buy only energy-efficient windows car- 
rying the National Fenestration Rating Coun- 
cil INFUQ \abe\. 



The NFRCJabcl rates a window's energy 
performance and allows consumers to make 
apples-to-apples comparisons regarding U- 
Factor and Solar Heal Gain Coefficient 
(SHGC).Thc lower the U-Fnctor, the better 
the window prevents interior heat from es- 
caping; the lower the SHGC, the better the 
window prevents unwanted solar heat from 
entering. 

Many slates are now requiring all window 
products to carry the NFHC label. Check your 
local building codes for proper compliance. 

• Choose windows with low-emissiviiy 
(Low-Fi) glass for maximum energy efficiency. 
Low-E glass features transparent metallic 
coatings that significantly reduce heating and 
cooling costs year-round. Low-E glass is a 
standard component of most Andersen 
wood-clad products. In fact, Andersen High- 
performance glass is, on average, <1 1 percent 
more energy efficient in summer and 35 per- 
cent more energy efficient in winter than 
standard dual-pane glass. 

•Select energy-efficient windows that re- 
quire minimal maintenance. 

A clad wood window in either an alu- 
minum or vinyl-coated exterior provides 
maximum energy efficiency, low mainte- 
nance and the beauty of a natural-wood inte- 
rior finish, if desired. If homeowners prefer a 
painted interior, wood windows are easily 
painted to change the look of a home's interi- 
or. 

•Maximize the light in your home with 



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Windows play an integral role in home construction and remodeling projects. They 
can improve a home's energy efficiency, enhance a home's architectural design 
and provide essential daylighUng. Window shopping, however, can be a trying time. 



window combinations, skylights, high ceilings 
and tight interiors. 

Studies show (hat exposure to natural 
light has a positive effect on our emotional 
and physical health. But most people spend a 
majority of their time in artificially lit environ- 
ments, receiving less than an hour of nalural 
light a day. Not surprising, homeowners crave ■ 
light-filled rooms, and adding windows is one 
of the most popular remodeling projects in 
the nation today. 

Windows and skylights brighten and en- 
hance living spaces, especially in homes with 
high ceilings and light-colored interiors. Us- 
ing windows in interesting shapes such as 
arches, triangles and ovals is popular, or you 
may opt for a dramatic combination of stan- 
dard-sized windows to bring in light. 

"It is cost effective to take several stan- 
dard windows and design a creative combina- 
tion," said Stacy Brick, manager of brand 
public relations at Andersen Windows. "Com- 
bining stock windows in this way creates a 
custom look but eliminates costly special or- 
ders." 

• Increase your home's curb appeal by de- 
signing special window combinations. 
A cluster of windows not only floods a room 
with natural light, but adds a unique design 



element that enn pay off should you decide to 
sett. Windows also have become critical dc- . 
sign elements to beautify a home's living eh- ' 
vironment. 

• Consider window accessories to im- 
prove a home's style. 

One of the most popular window acces- 
sories is grilles or (millions that give the look 
of dividing the window into many separate . ! 
panes. A number of styles and designs are 
available, including exterior, interior and 
grilles-between-the-glass where the accessory 
is actually between the panes of insulated 
glass. Andersen offers a unique option in the 
Andersen Art Glass Collection, which features 
1 1 original stained glass designs. This option 
is popular because you can use a window as a 
decorating tool without covering the window 
or blocking nalural light. Andersen Art Glass 
panels fit most new or existing Andersen win- 
dows. 

For a copy of (he Andersen 207 10 limited 
warranty and moie information about Ander- 
sen products, contact your local Andersen 
dealer listed under "windows" in the Yellow 
Pages, or call l-8O0-426-42Gi,ext. 1232. for 
the dealer near you. 

Courtesy ofArlick Resource Association, 
www.arucopy.com. e-mail: ■info@wacopy.cam. 



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VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Parenting Class 

At 10 a.m. on Saturday, Octo- 
ber 9. "Parenting Class" will be 
held for expectant parents at 
Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 
North Sheridan Road, 
Waukegan. This informative 
class will explain the skills es- 
sential to caring for a new baby, 
areas covered include bathing, 
feeding, safety, infant behavior 
and family concerns. There is a 
SKI class fee. To register, call 
Victory's New Family Center at 
3fifM297, extension 5218. 

Closed Cocaine 
Anonymous 

At 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oc- 
tober 9, a "Closed Cocaine 
Anonymous" support group will 
meet at Victory Memorial Hospi- 
tal. 132-1 North Sheridan Road. 
Waukegan, Call 360-4090 for in- 
formation. 

LAKE FOREST 
HOSPITAL 

Diabetes N.E.W.S. Group 
Program 

Lifestyle change program for 
individuals diagnosed with type 
II diabetes. Fee for members is 
SI 10. non-members S220 and in- 
cludes a pass to workout at the 
HFI during the program. Call 
735-1200, ext. 7056. It will be 
[held Wednesdays, October 20 
[through December 8 from 6 to 
8:30 p.m. 

What's New in Breast 
[Cancer Care? 

As part of the Welles Memorial 
[Cancer Series, in memory of Bet- 
ty and Ed Welles, a panel of 
>rcast cancer specialists discuss 
lew trends in breast cancer di- 
ignoses and treatments, includ- 
ing risk factors and trends in 
>rcast cancer prevention. Regis- 
ter In advance to receive a per- 
sonalized print out of your indi- 
fitiunUzctrriik' orucvetoptriB 
breast cancer. Call 234-61 12. 

Held Thursday. October 2 1 from 
7 to 8:30 p.m. 

PR0VENA SAINT 
THERESE MEDICAL 
CENTER 

Mammograms Offered at 
Reduced Cost of $55 

In October, Provena Saint 
Therese Center is offering mam- 
mogram screenings at a reduced 
cosi of S55. Most insurance com- 
panies in Illinois reimburse 
women older than 35 for mam- 
mograms, and a mammogram 
screening is approved by - 
Medicare. Payment is required 
at the time of the screening. Call 
today to schedule an appoint- 
ment: 360-2020 for Provena 
Saint Therese Medical Center. 
2615 Washington St., Waukegan; 
or 356-4428 for Provena Area 
Treatment Satellite. 37809 N. 
Route 59. Lake Villa. 

Dinner with a Doctor 

"Kids. Colds and Concerns" 
(children's illnesses). Oct. 13 
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Salutos 
Italian restaurant, 7680 Grand 
Ave., Gurncc. Presented by Sara 
Parvinian, MD, board-certified 
pediatrician on staff at Provena 
Saint Therese Medical Center. 
Cost is S10 and includes a buffet 
dinner, beverage and dessert.. 
For reservations, call 360-2181. 

Free Hip and Joint 
Screening 

Oct. 20 from noon to 3 p.m. 
in Room 1 10 at Provena Saint 
Therese Medical Center, 2615 
Washington St., Waukegan. Or- 
thopedic doctors will offer free 
consultations and examinations 
for those with hip, knee or other 
joint problems. To register, call 
1-088-869-1118. 




HEALTHWATCH 



B1 1/ Lakeland Newspapers 



October 8, 1999 



Spread the word and not the germs: A back to school 
lesson in handwashing for the whole family 



As fall approaches and children 
arc back to school, they can look 
forward to many great things: New 
classrooms and desks, playing on 
the monkey bars at recess, shooting 
basketball hoops in gym class, see- 
ing their friends who have been 
away all summer . . . and picking up 
germs from all of them! Back-to- 
school lime is the perfect time to 
encourage proper handwashing 
habits for the whole family. 

Keeping hands clean is the 
most important means for prevent- 
ing infectious diseases. According 
to the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention (CDC), these can in- 
clude respiratory infections and 
gastrointestinal disorders. Teaching 
kids at home about proper hand- 
washing helps them to maintain 
good habits and keeps them health- 
ier as they return to school in the 
fall. Adults, too, could use a re- 
minder so they can provide a good 
example for their children. 

The first step is finding a hand 
soap that cleans properly and is ef- 
fective for the whole family. "Liquid 
hand soap in a dispenser is a more 
sanitary and convenient way to 
wash up," says home-care expert 
Gerry Luepke. She suggests Clean & 
Smooth as an ideal hand soap for 
combating germs and dirt that chil- 
dren are picking up from school. 



Since kids arc busy with all 
kinds of activities at this time of 
year, they can easily forget about 
proper washing habits or about 
handwashing altogether. According 
to. Luepke, "Simply stressing the im- 
portance of not spreading genns to 
their friends and family and making 
handwashing a fun activity will help 
to keep kids clean." 

The best suggestion is to start 
early. A good system for pre-kinder- 
ga iten or younger children is to 
wash hands for two verses of "Row, 
Row, Row Your Boat." With older 
children and teenagers, being up 
front about germs and the spread of 
disease should help them remem- 
ber to keep their hands clean. 

It is important for both kids and 
adults to know how and when to 
wash their hands, and to spread this 
knowledge to friends and family 
(instead of spreading germs!) Here 
are some helpful tips to ensure 
proper technique and timing. 

How to Wash Hands Property 

1 ) Roll up long sleeves and re- 
move any rings from fingers. 

2) Using warm water, wet hands 
thoroughly. 

3) Apply soap and wash com- 
pletely, rubbing palms together, 
getting the tops of hands, in be- 
tween fingers, and the wrists. After 



People on the move 



Tlie staff of The New Family Cen- 
ter, Victory Memorial Hospital 
(Waukegan) is constantly improving 
its skills through advanced educa- 
tion. 

Recently completing certification 
requirements in Inpatient Obstet- 
rics were Dcnise Fredricks. R.N., 
Spring Grove; Pal Guy, R.N., 
Waukegan; Maggie McDermott, 
R.N.. Kenosha; Cindy Rindahl. R.N., 
Wadsworth; and Maggie Robinson, 
R.N., Spring Grove. 

Receiving Low-Risk Neonatal cer- 
tification were Gerry Desblens, R.N.. 
Antioch; Lynne Helmkamp, R.N., 
Zion; Mary Jo Hernandez, R.N., 
Zion; and marje Larson, R.N.. Zion. 

In addition to advanced certifica- 
tion, New Family Center nurses 
have also completed the two-day 
educational course. "Fetal Heart 
Monitoring— Principle and Prac- 



tice" which was sponsored by The 
Association of Women's Health, ob- 
stetric and neonatal Nurses. Com- 
pleting dm class were Gloria Bran- 
ded. R.N., Wildwood; Denise 
Fredricks, R.N.. Spring Grove; Pat 
Guy, R.N., Waukegan; Karen KHIen, 
R.N., Zion: Noreen McCarthy. R.N., 
Wildwood; Maggie McDermott, 
R.N., Kenosha; Doris Presliek, R.N., 
Green Oaks; Cindy Rindahl, R.N., 
Wadsworth; Maggie Robinson, R.N., 
Spring Grove; and Ann Shastal, 
R.N., Antioch. 

The New Family Center at Victory 
Memorial Hospital, Waukegan, pro- 
vides mother/child care for nearly 
1 , 1 00 births each year in both tradi- 
tional delivery rooms and birthing 
rooms. For information on parent- 
ing and birthing classes, as well as a 
tour of The New Family Center, call 
360-4121. 




(Left to right) Maggie Robinson, R.N., Spring Grove; Cindy Rindahl, 
R.N., Zion; and Mary Jo Hernandez, R.N., Zion; are nurses at Vic- 
tory Memorial Hospital's New Family Center who have increased 
their level through advanced certifications. Robinson and Rindahl 
completed certification requirements in Inpatient Obstetrics as 
well as completing The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric 
and Neonatal Nurses' "Fetal Heart Monitoring-Principle and Prac- 
tice" course. Hernandez completed Low- Risk Neonatal certifica- 
tion. 




Germs are passed back and forth by contact between younsters. 
Frequent hand washing can help. 



kids have been playing outside, in a 
sandbox or on a playground, for ex- 
ample, have them wash their fore- 
arms as well. 

4) Rinse hands well. 

5) Dry hands with a disposable 
paper towel. 

6) Using the paper towel, turn 
off (he faucet and dispose of the 
towel. 

(Courtesy of the Texas Department 
ofHealth) 

When to Wash Your Hands 

Before 

• Preparing food. 

• Eating. 

• Changing a diaper. 

• Fixing a wound or injury 
(yours or someone else's). 

•Handling an infant. 

• Inserting or removing contact 
lenses. 

THis is becoming increasingly 
important as more and more young 
children are wearing them. Accord- 
ing to the American Optometric As- 
sociation, about 25 Million Ameri- 



cans wear contact lenses. Of this 
grouping, ten percent are 16 or 
younger. 
After 

• Using the bathroom. 
•Changing a diaper. 

• Handling uncooked foods, es- 
pecially meat, poultry, or fish. 

• Playing with a pet. 

• visiting someone who is ill 

• Sneezing or blowing your 
nose. 

• Whenever your hands do not 
feel clean! 

As the Centers for Disease Con- 
trol have noted, dirty hands are a 
key source in the spread of disease. 
Using an antibacterial soap, such as 
one made by Clean & Smooth, will 
further help to do away with these 
illness-causing germs. By using the 
simple tips mentioned above and 
maintaininggood habits outside of 
the home, everyone should have a 
healthier and cleaner fall season. 

For more tips and information 
contact Cerry Luepke at (800) 284- 
2023. 



YMCA to celebrate Breast 
Cancer Awareness Month 



Information is available about 
free mammograms and infonna- 
tional seminars. 

The YMCA of Lake County EN- 
COREplus Program will be recog- 
nizing Breast Cancer Awareness 
Month in October by setting up ed- 
ucational sites across the county. 
ENCORE plus, a breast cancer and 
reproductive health program aimed 
at education and early detection of 
breast cancer, will be available to 
sign women up for free mammo- 
grams and educational seminars 
about woman's health. 

"Early detection is the key to 
beating breast cancer," said Carol 
Carr, Program Manager of EN- 
COREplus. "Women who detect 
their cancer early have a 97 per- 
cent survival rate. Mammography 
and Breast Self Exam arc absolute- 
ly vital for early detection and sur- 
vival." 

Breast Cancer is the most com- 



mon form of cancer among women 
in the United States affecting one in 
eight American women. Women 
should receive their first mammo- 
gram between the ages of 35 and 40 
and should receive an annual 
mammogram after 40. Breast Self 
Exam should be done each month 
and a Clinical Exam should be re- 
ceived each year. 

The ENCOREplus Program pro- 
vides free educational seminars to 
the community. The free seminars 
are available to community groups, 
churches, employees or any other 
group interested in how to effec- 
tively catch breast cancer at its ear- 
liest stages and saving women's 
lives. 

For questions, to sign up for a 
free services or to schedule a free 
seminar, contact the YMCA EN- 
COREplus Program at 782-3 1 42 or 
stop by the YMCA at 2133 Belvidere 
Rd., Waukegan. 



_mj|UW«JWililMHllH llMMllliMiiiWHwrrr 



rwroTinrnni r* ii 



B1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



October 8, 1999 



u 



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4 



Are the 10 Commandments really dangerous? 



Ill Dr. Singer, 

I know you don't usually 
handle questions on religion, 
but some thing happened that I 
was so angry about and I 
thought it would lie interest- 
ing to get your take on it. 

My 12-ycnr-old daughter Is 
lit public school. Last week, 
she had a laminated copy of 
the 10 Commandments that 
we had gotten her. We had not 
instructed her to bring it to 
school specifically, but she 
'-' ?• felt like bringing it one day. 
Her teacher saw her talking 
about It with another child 
and confiscated it. The 
teacher told my daughter that 
she could pick it up at the end 
of the day at the office. My 
daughter was very upset be- 
cause she felt like she bad 
been scolded and when she 
told mc, I had to keep calm 
outside for her sake, but was 
very upset Inside. My daughter 
has learned about everything 
in school from gangs, to sex to 
Satanism. I am sickened by 
the fact that the 10 command- 
ments arc treated like illegal 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Dr. Sherri Singer 



contraband. Do you think this 
is right? 

Old Fashioned Mom 

Dear Old Fashioned Mom, 

First, I don't think you should 
call yourself that because it certain- 
ly shouldn't he old-fashioned lo 
wain your child lobe exposal to 
goodness. I am saddened and also 
upset by what you described in 
your call. While I understand the 
whole, "separation of church and 
state" thing, I also don't understand 
why every form of dreck is OK lo 
teach our kids in school, but teach- 
ing anything having to do with be- 
ing a good human being, following 
rules of decency and believing in a 
higher power is all but illegal. After 
all, the 10 Commandments, while 
they do have their roots in religion 



and Cod, really are about rules of 
decent living. We could all learn 
more about decent living. Having 
kids in school learn to follow decent 
rules would also not be a bad thing. 

I think the main problem here is 
that anything related to religion in a 
school usually starts a firestorm of 
controversy for the school. There 
;ire groups of people who don't be- 
lieve in Cod and also groups of peo- 
ple who feel that minority religious 
status would start terrible problems 
for their kid:» if religion was allowed 
into the schools. I can understand 
their position, but again, will say 
thai I believe the 10 Command- 
ments are about rules of decent liv- 
ing more than they are about reli- 
gion or prayer. If your daughter 
were demanding time for organized 
class prayer, then I might under- 
stand the teacher's reaction a little 
better. Not I hat prayer is bad or 
wrong, but the debate over prayer in 
school has two sides and is heated. 
It is not something that public 
schools want to eagerly approach. 

Although I really have no power 
here, I think that your daughter 
should be allowed to carry her lami- 
nated 10 Commandments in her 
folder or wallet. If the school has a 




How will your children's future be 
affected if they are not absorbing and 
processing what they should be today? 

WHAT WILL THE? MISS? 

Dr. Singer can help you improve your child's processing skills, focus, 
concentration, motivation, behavior and attitude without using drugs. 

Call today to havo your child screened for processing problems (708) 962-2549 




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problem wilh her making that pub- 
lic, it does seem to lly in I he face of 
freedom of speech and religion, but 
if you fighi Tor her rights to discuss 
those commandments on school 
grounds, you may be looking at a 
huge controversy rind a huge fight. 
It might he more worth your while 
to look into enrolling your daughter 
in private, religious school. In that 
kind of selling, she could openly 
carry her 10 Commandments and 
probably have class discussion 
about them without controversy. 
This society seems to be be- 
coming more and more anti-faith, 
anti-religion anil anti-God. As I 
said, il saddens me because there is 
certainly a plethora of information 
about evil everyday, Faith, God and 
religion, in their true form, are all 
about living a decent life and treat- 



ing others as you would like lo be 
i rented. I frankly see nothing wrong 
with this and believe our world 
could use fl little bit more of il. Pub- 
lic school may not be the place for it 
though. Tell your daughter for me 
that I am very pleased (hat she is in- 
terested in Ihe 10 commandments 
enough to discuss them. 

litis column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information in 
this column cannot and should not 
replace proper Psychological treat- 
ment. Dr. Sherri Singer is a Ucensed 
Clinical Psychologist, childhood k»- 
hai'ior specialist and author of the 
Imok, "Why kids mislk'hutv! What 
every parent needs to know to keep 
their kids on the right track!" For tin 
appointment, please call t7t)lt) 962' 
2549or,W7)5(7.'8a32. 



CondelPs Auxiliary's 
1999 benefit gala to 
Ride Into Millennium 



Guests will "Ride Into (he Mil- 
lennium" in style at Condell Med- 
ical Center's Eighth annual Benefit 
Gala. Set for Saturday, November 6, 
at Twin Orchard Country Club in 
Long Grove, this fantastic evening 
will feature an outsiandingSilent 
Auction highlighting wonderful 
methods of travel and vacation des- 
tinations. The new band, Indigo, 
will provide entertainment and mu- 
sic for dancing. 

Sponsored by The Auxiliary of 
Condell Medical Center, the benefit 
Gala grows more successful, contin- 
uing to benefit the hospital in its 
ongoing commitment to deliver 
quality medical service to the resi- 
dents of Lake County, 

This year, The auxiliary is focus- 
ing on the transport needs of senior 
citizens and physically challenged 
children. Funds raised by the 1909 
Gala have been dedicated to the 
purchase of a specially equipped, 
handicapped-accessible van for 
people heeding outpatient services 
and for the Condell Day Center for 
Intergeneralional Care. Piuuls will 
also be donated to Eric's Place, an 
accessible playground recently con- 
structed on Condell's Libcrtyville 
campus lo serve children with spe- 
cial needs. 

According to Gala chairpersons, 
Dr. Sieve and Sandra Marquardl, 
the list of exciting Silent Auction 
items just keeps growing. Kerry 



Luilgaarden, Silent Auction chair- 
person, said thai a lop auction item 
is a four-seater Paddle Wheeler 1 1 1 
from Ahlstrand Marine, Muridejein, 
which carries out ihe Gala's travel 
theme. 

The growing Silent Auction list 
also Includes: 

• Windstar seven-nights Caribbean 
Cruise for two 

• Two round-trip tickets lo any- 
where in the contiguous United 
states from American Aii lines 

■ Seven nights in two-bedroom 
condo in Silver Thorn (Keystone 
area), Colorado 

• Tropical vacation fomwu In 
Montego Bay. laniacii with air- 
fare and accommodations from 
Classic Travel of Vernon Hills, 
Apple Vacations and Comfort 
[tin St Suites, 

• Deluxe Sky Box for a Chicago 
Bulls game from AT&T, Broadband 
& Internet Services ■ 

• Pour Days and nights in Deer 
Valley, Utah from Dr. and Mrs. 
\ Valid Ghanious 

Two unique auction items fea- 
ture a "Day in Springfield" with 
State Senator Adeline Geo-Karis 
and a "Page for a Day" in Ihe I louse 
of Representatives, a gift from State 
Representative Andrea Moore. 

Por more information and 
reservations, call The Auxiliary of 
Condell Medical Center at :t(>2- 
2905, cxi. 5540. 



Asthma and dorm living: A 
14-point survival guide 



Poorly managed asthma during 
college can interfere with career 
choices and claim lives. Kaclt year, 
students with asthma die; most of- 
ten, the deaths were preventable. 
The athlete who forgot lo carry his 
inhaler while jogging; Ihe 19-year- 
old who collapsed and died in the 
front yard of a party she left because 
people were smoking; the honors 
student who became Intoxicated, 
had an attack, passed out and died 
alone in his room while searching 
for his inhaler— these tragedies can 
be avoided. 

As students with asthma are off 
to college, the Allergy and Asthma 
Network • Mothers of Asthmatics, 
Inc. (AAN'MA), offers the following 
survival guide to prevent asthma 
symptoms from interfering in col- 
lege life. Allergens, irritants and res- 
piratory illness associated with 
campus living can be kept to a min- 
imum with careful planning. 

1. Obtain an updated, written 



asthma management plan from 
your allergist before leaving for col- 
lege. New medical ions, such as in- 
haled corticosteroid and nonsedat- 
ing antihistamines, fight symptoms 
without unwanted side effects, in 
particular the drowsiness associat- 
ed with over-the-counter antihista- 
mines. 

2. Keep dorm room duller to a 
minimum; no upholstered furni- 
ture or secondhand rugs as these 
are filled with allergens. 

3. Ifthere are bunk beds, take 
the lop level lo avoid inhaling bed- 
ding dttsi from your roommate 
each night. 

4. Use a MI-PA room air filter, 
encase bedding with dust mite- 
proof covers, and wash sheets and 
blankets weekly to keep your room 
as free of dust mites and other air- 
borne panicles as possible. 

5. Avoid social situations where 
you know you will be exposed lo 
cigarette or oilier types of smoke. 



] 






ktober8, 1999 



HEALTHWATCH 



lutting Out' Breast Cancer 

tiitirtc- ifnr Cil/m K 1 i llnnnti ■ *+-* i. .Ill fhil mm l,,.l- «._1 _._!._..?- ^..L..;.. 



Lakeland Newspapers /B13 



Stylists for Salon Millennium will 

cutting, styling and primping Tor 

[cure on the weekend of Saturday, 

|c(obcr 8 and Sunday, October 9 — 

help find a cure for breast cancer 

iat is. Salon Millennium, 727 Elm 

trcct, Winnctka, wilt take part In 

Hopecuts '99," a beauty celebration 

int benefits City of Hope's Walk for 

|opc Against Breast Cancer. Tvvcn- 

■ five percent of the proceeds raised 

ill support breast cancer research 

City of Hope National Medical 

inter and Beckman Research Instl- 

itc. 

Stylists, technicians and aes- 
teticians from Salon Millennium 
.ill offer customers the chance to re- 
ceive top-rate salon services while 
)encfitlng breast cancer research, 
bese services include haircuts, hair 



styling, hair coloring, manicures, 
pedicures, massages and facials. To 
make an appointment, please call 
441-0057. 

City of Hope Is conducting a 
number of promising clinical tri- 
als that are helping to redefine 
the standards of care for breast 
cancer patients at medical cen- 
ters nationwide. This research 
Involves establishing innovative 
breast cancer research protocols 
Including bone marrow trans- 
plantation, new anti-cancer 
drugs, radiotherapy, breast con- 
serving surgery, gene therapy, 
immunologic treatments and 
quallty-of-life studies that ad- 
dress the mental and emotional 
trauma experienced by many 
women and their families. 



ncMLinwMiun ^^ . Lakeland Newspapers /PI 

Education program for care givers scheduled 



'Understanding and caring for the 
person with Alzheimer's' series held 



All sessions will be held from 7.-00 
p.m. till 8:30 p.m. at the Sheridan 
Health Care Center. 

Session 1: Alzheimer's Disease 
and Activities of Daily Living- 
Wednesday, October 13. In this ses- 
sion you will learn how to assist your 
loved one with normal activities of 
daily living like bathing, dressing, 
eating, and toileting. Issues involv- 
ing safety, mobility and self medica- 
tion will be highlighted. Creative 
techniques utilizing the person's re- 
maining abilities and strengths will 
be shared. These can ease the strain 
that often accompanies these issues 







Lesson Program 

'Horsemanship is more than just riding a horse. 

We specialize in building confidence and self-esteem in 
the rider, while educating our students about the 
entire horse, including anatomy and psychology. 
(Written material included.) 



V 



**\ 



>> 



We believe that the more you know, the more confident 
a rider and horseperson you will become. 

All Disciplines Welcome: 

Western • English • Dressage • Natural Horsemanship 

Group or private. 
Bring your horses or lesson horses provided 

Miller's Farm (just 10 min. from Antloch) Is located 

in Bong State Park with 13 miles of groomed riding trails 

Full Service Barn • Boarding • Sales • Lessons 

2903 2641h Ave., Salem, WI 414/537-2827^ 



JOIN US 

SUN., OCT. 10, 1999 

"Ride For 

The Cure 

Of 
Breast Cancer" 

Arrive: 
8:30 a.m.- 11:30 a.m. 

(Refreshments Served Till 10 a.m.) 

FREE T-SHIRTS 
to First 50 Riders! 

Minimum Pledge - $20.00 

To Ride. Sponsor Sheets Available 

At Bong & Miller's. 

For more information. 

Call Chrys at (414) 537-4956 



■ ■•» - 
AMBttCAN 



I 



fir>* • 7>*vY*}i • /Ww**-7. 



■» 



before 

after 



Come See Us Today For Clear Answers About Clear Vision 
The Eye Care Center of Lake County 

can show you how 

Laser Vision Correction 

may reduce or eliminate your dependence on glasses or contacts. 



Call Today for a Complimentary Consultation 

S47.516.1699 



>*», 




Vernon Hills • Waukegan • Fox Lake 



Now $99/rnonth* payment plan available 



*witn crsctt approvsl 



visit us at 
www.LASIK.nu 



and allow more effective, efficient 
and safe care giving. 

Session 2: Taking Care of Your- 
self and Other Family Members- 
Wednesday, October 20. Caring for 
a loved one with Alzheimer's Dis- 
ease is not only physically challeng- 
ing, but can strain emotions within 
the family structure. In this final ses- 
sion, care givers will be given sugges- 
tions on how to set realistic goals 
and expectations for themselves, 
cope with the changes in their lives, 
and how to respond to the various 
reactions that are common among 
family members and friends. 

Expert Speakers 

Maria Becker, Administrator, 
Sheridan Health Care Center, started 
at Sheridan as a staff nurse 16 years 
ago and has been the Administrator 
for the past 6 years. 

Marge Durda, U.S.. Gerontolo- 
gist, has coordinated social services 
at the Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Senior 
Center for 14 years. She is member- 
ship chairperson of the Senior Ser- 
vice Coalition of Lake County, a 
member of the Lake Forest Hospital 
Home-Health Advisory Board, and 
coordinates the "Relief for Care 
Givers'* program, a community- 
based volunteer respite program for 
family care givers. 

Emogene Davis, a veteran care 
giver, who Is sensitive to her own 
needs along with the needs of family 
members who have Alzheimer's Dis- 
ease. She is creative in finding ways 
to extend caring relationships, have 
fun, develop new relationships, and 
maximize trie quality of life for her- 
self and those around her. 

George Demos, RPh., FASCP, 
Lawrence-Weber Medical, An Omni- 
"carc Company; Is a consultant phar- 
macist in long term care with 'over -25 
years of experience. He works with 
special care units in geriatric facili- 
ties and serves on several psy- 
chotropic and interdisciplinary 
teams. He was an investigator in 
post-marketing surveillance of 
tacrine (Cognex) and the first ap- 
proved drug in the treatment of 
Alzheimer's disease. '• 

Murray Gordon, President, 



MAGA Limited, an independent in- 
surance company specializing in In- 
dividual and group Long-Term Care 
Insurance. He founded MAGA in 
1975 recognizing the need for pro- 
tection against spiral ing nursing 
home and home care costs. MAGA 
is affiliated with Life Services Net- 
work of Illinois, the Illinois Associa- 
tion of Realtors, Community 
Bankers Association of Illinois, the 
Illinois Association of School Admin- 
istrators and The Illinois Principals' 
Association. Gordon and MAGA 
have been involved with a great 
many conferences on health, aging 
and Alzheimer's Disease. 

Brenda Grant, Activity Director, 
Sheridan Health Care Center, has 
worked closely with different popula- 
tions such as (he geriatric resident, 
those with MI, and the Alzheimer's/ 
Dementia resident for 7 years. 

Elizabeth S. Kessler, M.D., Neu- 
rologist, and Medical Director for the- 
Memory Assessment Program at 
Highland Park Hospital. Kessler is As- 
sociate Professor of Clinical Neurolo- 
gy & Associate Professor of Clinical 
Psychiatry at the Chicago Medical 
School. 

Sharon Roberts, R.N., B.S.N., 
N.HA, MA, a nurse, nursing home 
ad mi nisi or and geronotologidst with 
a longstanding interest in demetia 
care. She has cared for people with 
alzheimer's disease, consulted to 
nursing homes on their behalf, been 
involved in research about feeding 
and bathing behaviors, taught staff 
and family care givers, and facilitated 
care giver and Early Stage support 
groups. Roberts is the immediate 
Past-President of the Greater 
Chicagoland Alzheimers Association. 

Kate Swift, R.P.h, Consultant 
Pharmacist, Lawrence-Weber Med- 
ical, An Omnicare Company, is a 
member of the American Society of 
Consultant Pharmacists and has 
more than eight years of experience 
working with AblVeimci's patients In 
a special care unit 

Ross Zeller, Director of Admis- 
sions, Sheridan Health Care Center, 
has also served as Director, of Social 
Services in his 5 years there. He has 
served three Lutheran churches as 
pastor for 16 years. 

To register to attend this free edu- 
cation program or for more informa- 
tion, please call Ross Zeller at Sheridan 
Health Care Center at 745-W35. 



UNDERSTANDING & CARING 
FOR THE PERSON WITH ALZHEIMERS 

Al/hciiiKT s (arc divers Series 
A six V'vsion (.nurse tor Kimilv (are divers 



SEMINAR LOCATION: Sheridan Health Care Center 
SEMINAR TIME: 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. 

SEMINAR TOPICS: 



Session 1 Alzheimer's Disease: latest Trends 
in Research and Treatments 
Previously Taken Place 

Session 2 Helping the Person «iih 
Alzheimer's Disease Cope 
Wednesday, September 22. 1999 

Session 3 Legal and Financial Implications 
In Alzheimer's Disease 
Wednesday, September 29. 1999 



EXPERT SPEAKERS: 

•Mjrfj Irder, Adaiabtntor, Ocridu llealA Care Crater 
i/Iaogtac Davii, ■ wimi art p»n 

• Himj Conk*. rmUni. MICA li-iieJ 

•Irtadi Cmt JWiay Dimtoe, Steridai MA On Crater 

• Uiubcik 1 Kn. ike, M. , Vindojbl 

• SIua* lot*m, IX, ISA, \JU. MA 

•Roa letter, Director of Adathtioa*, Acrtdaa tlnlia Car* 
Ceater 



Session 4 Tapping Community Resources 
Wednesday, October 6, 1999 



Session j Alzheimer's Disease and Acti 
of Daily thing 
Wednesday, October I 



id Activities I 
3. 1999 



Scssl on 6 Taking Car e of Yourself and Other 
Family Members 
Wednesday, October 20, 1999 



•Mutt larda. Ii., CeroaleiopK 

t'Cwr Down. Ul, f ASCF, Uarearr-TeWr Medical, 

U Omaia/r Co«pj») 
•Carl) HrDea, OTfct Director of Altktwi'i Care, 

TV teibklrr of LiataU&rc 
•Kale Siih, 111, CotMltatl Pkaraucui, 

Li»TT«r * cW Medical, .la Oaakart Coatuti 



To Register, Call: 




Sheridan Health Care Center 

2534 Elim Avenue, Zion, Illinois 60099 

phone 847-746-8435 to 847-746-1744 

A Skilled Cut jud RehibiliUlJon Facility 




AFFORDABLE QUALITY ALZHEIMER'S CARE 












I 



n 




MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



Equal pay for 
equal work? 
Really? 



I like to read, and one of my fa- 
vorite recreational reads is 
Marilyn vos Savant's column in 
the newspaper's Sunday Pa- 
rade magazine. It's called, "Ask 
Marilyn" and features her answers^ 
to reader's provocative questions. 

The columns vos Savant writes 
are witty, insightful and entertain- 
ing, I enjoy them though they sel- 
dom contain anything about small 
business. 

This may come as a shock to 
Hillary Clinton fans, but vos Savant 
is listed in the "Guinness Book of 
World Records" Hall of Fame as the 
female with die "Highest IQ." 
There really is a world's smartest 
woman. Maybe, Hillary grew up in 
the wrong village. Sony, I digress. 

Recently, a reader wrote to "Ask 
Marilyn" with a question about 
why women are paid less than men 
for equal work. Here is an excerpt 
from vos Savant's reply: "Consider 
this: If their work is equal, why 
-■ aren't employers slashing their 
payroll costs by hiring women in- 
stead of men? In a free market, 
businesses are highly competitive, 
and if they are paying men more 
than they pay women - by any per- 
centage - there must be a reason." 

Think about this 

1 found the above statement 
very thought provoVlnR. 1 tnvor 
equal pay Tor «*qunl wo iK. It's fair, 

honest and It's common sense. 

However, it doesn't always 
work that way. Gender gaps still ex- 
ist. The latest figures I recall hear- 
ing Is that women are averaging be- 
tween 75 and BO percent of what 
men arc earning in the same jobs. 

There are several possible ex- 
planations. One reason may be a 
woman's willingness to accept less. 
Some may feel that a job with only 
average pay is better than no job at 
all. 

Another reason may be that 
some women have less experience 
than their associates. For example, 
women who stay home to raise 
children, may And that their male 
counterparts kept current with 
technology, industry developments 
and relationships. 

A third explanation maybe that 
management is still a male domi- 
nated arena. Some managers may 
just feel more comfortable with 
*> other men in leadership roles. I 
think this is particularly true with 
managers who are less confident 
and competent. They may feel in- 
timidated by bright, able and ag- 
gressive women. 

Another possibility may be the 
law of supply and demand. As 
more and more women poured 
Into the workforce in the 7Q's, 80's 
and 90's, the increasing supply may 
have contributed to lower wages. 

What is equal work? 

While most of us support equal 
pay for equal work, the tough ques* 
* • tion is, "What is equal work?" Con- 
sider these examples. First, two 
fourth-grade schoolteachers. Equal 
work justifying equal pay? In reality 
one teacher loves the students, 
spends untold hours preparing 
special projects and challenges the 
students daily. The other is just 
*•• marking time until retirement. 

Another example. Two truck 
drivers, same number of years of 
service and miles driven. Equal 



Please TAYLOR/BJ5 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



B 1 4 /Lakeland Newspapers 



October 8, 1999 



Businesses told to 
check insurance 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Insurance is surrounding every- 
one in one form or another— from 
obvious coverage for your family, to 
sporting events. 

That's the word from Phil Delany 
of Delany Insurance in addressing 
the Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry's monthly morning 
meeting at the Maplethorpe Com- 
munity Room within the Communi- 
ty Building in the Community Build- 
ing. 

"You find insurance anywhere 
you go," Delany, a veteran of 14 
years in the insurance business, 
explained. "From a hole in one on 
a golf course to a $1 million shot at 
a basketball game. It's all covered 
by insurance." 

In a homeowners policy, a 
$200,000 valued home, for example, 
will be insured in several parts. One 
would be the contents, which is gen- 
erally insured for 70 percent of the 
home value, or 5140,000. Detached 
structures usually comprise 10 per- 
cent of value, or $20,000 and loss of 
use would make up 20 percent, or 
$40,000. Add it all up, and there is 
$400,000 worth of value, which may 
cost anywhere from $350-$500 to 
cover, according to Delany. 

There is a liability section within 
most policies that help cover the 
homeowner in the event of a law suit 

from a IhtnX party. Ccntjrutty, vl iU In- 
cludes coverage from $300,000 to 

$500,000, depending upon the poli- 
cy and die premiums. 

"The insurance company is able 
to take the small dollars and pool 
them which enables diem to pay out 
large amounts of money in die event 
of a claim," Delany said. 

In the case of business owners, 
there are two ways to go, according 
to Delany. Either a tailored protec- 
tion plan (TPP), or a general business 
owners policy. 

The TPP is used more with large 
business owners and manufacturers 
where different facets of the insurance 
can be combined Into one policy. 

For small businesses, the con- 
tents are considered when coming 
up with a rating, The amount of ex- 
posure to liability a business could 
have is also taken into account. 

The two areas arc looked at for 
the smaller business, and the in- 
surance agent then makes recom- 
mendations based upon the fig- 



ures, liability and other consider- 
ations. 

"We'll make sure to cover the 
contents of the business in the event 
of a loss, plus we'll look at the liabili- 
ty risk in case someone slips and falls 
In the business, or in the case of a 
plumbing or carpentry business, 
when you're out in the community 
doing a lot of your jobs," Delany ex- 
plained. "We look at the contents 
and die exposure, then come up with 
a rating." 

"There's a larger risk for a restau- 
rant which has property, gross sales 
and theft of money," Delany said, 
noting this business would be better 
off using the TPP. "There's greater 
risk involved, which may result in 
higher premiums." 

"You can put smaller business 
options under one dollar amount, 
such as glass fixtures and software, 
which would be available under cer- 
tain endorsements on the policy," 
Delany said. 

Most businesses — and home- 
owners—may want to make sure 
their policy includes coverage for 
"replacement cost" rather than a 
cash value. 

An example is a restaurant own- 
er who may have a lot of equipment 
that has depreciated. The cash value 
may be considerably less than if the 
owner had a complete loss of the 
business and wished to rebuild. Tak- 
ing the cash value might end up sev- 

arat hundroil ihauanrul Uotjars lu*» 

than what Is needed to get bock Into ' 
business. 

"Losses often times occur at 
peak seasons," Delany revealed. 
"That's when your taxing your facili- 
ties, your workers are die busiest and 
things might slip by. This should be 
taken into account when coming up 
with a policy in case you suffer a 
loss." 

Delany recommends checking 
with one's agent if there are any 
questions. 

"If you don't have coverage for 
something and you're concerned 
about it, you can usually get the cov- 
erage for a nominal cost," Delany 
added. "Make sure to check your 
limits of liability. 

Delany is a lifelong Antioch resi- 
dent, having graduated from St. Pe- 
ter's Grade School, AnUoch Commu- 
nityHigh School andNorthem Illinois 
University in DcKalb. Delany is active 
on the ACHS board and in various 
civic and community organizations. 




* * - it • • •— 


L-hf 

H 1 


v. 

\ 

' X. 
i 


I 


► : 



State helps builders 

Lt. Gov. Corrine wood said Illinois policy is to promote develop- 
ment and business success while protecting wildfire and natural 
resources, preserving open space, supporting infrastruxture and 
creating high-quality lifestyle. Wood spoke at a meeting of Home 
Builders Association of Lake and McHenry counties headed by 
Mark Buschman, left, of Lake County, and Tom Stephanl, right, 
of McHenry County. 



Delicious grand opening 

Kali Cowart, 3 of Zion enjoys food by a DaeWoo car during the 
Grand Opening of the new DaeWoo dealership on Milwaukee Av- 
enue In Llbertyville Sept. 25.— Photo by Lynn Gunnarson 
Dahlstrom 



Lake County Partners 
picks Creative Technical 
Services as agency 



. - Crrntivo Technical Survices. a. 

full service marketing and commu- 
nication agency, owned and operat- 
ed by Deborah Fliehman, has been 
selected by Lake County Partners as 
its agency of record. 

Since 1987, Creative Technical 
Services has serviced the corporate 
environment with business-to-busi- 
ness services. Clients include Alle- 
giance, Baxter, Tenneco Automotive, 
Arthur Andersen, and MacLcan- 
Fogg Company. Creative Technical 
Services provides marketing and 
communication consulting and 
planning, marketing and advertising 
material development and produc- 
tion, corporate identity, journal ad 
placement, direct mail, training and 
education, and web site design and 
Implementation. 

Creative Technical Services Is 
also a distributorof promoUonal and 



ndvarUsinfi spoctalito*..^ . * 

David Young, president or Lake 
County Partners announced, "We 
have charged CrcaUve Technical Ser- 
vices with several key marketing ini- 
tiatives that will enhance and 
strengthen our presence in Lake 
County, expand our current mem- 
bership, and broaden our ability to 
service groups interested or involved 
in business development, market! ng, 
and economic growth." 

Included in the first order of 
business is the development of a 
three to live-year marketing plan, as 
well as a new corporate Identity for 
Lake County Partners which will be 
unveiled at the First Annual Meeting 
for Members, Nov. 1 6 at the Marriott 
Lincolnshire. An extensive recruit- 
ment for new members is underway 
which will expand the current mem- 
bership roster. 



Navy project to create efficiency, 
jobs during 10-year construction 



Hundreds of new jobs will be 
created with work being spread over 
1 years in a massive works project to 
kick off next spring at Great Lakes 
Naval Training Center. 

All told, $700 million is ticketed 
to improve recruit training facilities. 

Ground will be broken this 
spring for the first of two new drill 
halls to replace current drill facilities 
erected in 1942. At that time, a five- 
year life span was envisioned for die 
wartime structures. 

Cost of each drill hall, big 
enough to house 1,000 recruits for 
training and Indoor graduation plus 
their attending families, will be $1 1 
million each. 

Planned for 2001 will be the first 
of 1 5 new barracks to total $600 mil- 
lion during the next decade. 

The barracks will be designed 
along a "total living-training" con- 
cept where both female and male re- 
cruits will sleep, eat, train and study, 
traditional mess halls are being elim- 
inated in the development plan. 



Each barracks will contain a galley 
where food prepared in a central 
kitchen will be served. 

Recruits will leave their barracks 
only for specialized training. 

Capt. Craig Hanson , commend- 
ing officer of recruit training, said 
everything is being designed to make 
the 9 1/2 week training cycle more 
efficient 

Other highlights of the construc- 
tion program Include a physical fit- 
ness facility, $11 million; support 
center and Battle Stations facility, 
$45-$50 million, where recruits un- 
dergo an intensive 12 hour involve- 
ment in simulated shipboard emer- 
gency experiences, prior to gradua- 
tion. 

Bulk of the upgrading will be 
at Camp Porter on the south side 
of Buckley Rd. Already under con- 
struction at Camp Moffetl is a $20 
million center for induction pro- 
cedures and the swimming pool. 
Moffett Is on the north side of 
Buckley Rd. 



October 8, 1999 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Lakeland Newspapers / B 1 S 



( 




Coming soon 

Breaking ground for the new Saunders Woods Corporate Center 
at 300 Saunders Road in Riverwoods, (from left): Bill Lederer, Ko- 
rman-Lederer; Los Korman, Korman-Lederer; Harlan S. Korman- 
Lederer; Jacob Kfferbaum, president, Kiferbaum Construction Cor- 
poration; Jill Cameron, attorney, Patzik, Frank & Samotny Ltd.; 
and Pat Lederer, Korman-Lederer. Saunders Woods Corporate 
Center is an 8-acre parcel of land to be developed into a busi- 
ness complex consisting of one 21,000 sq.-ft. speculative office 
building, a 7,454 sq.-ft. underground parking garage and two 
bulld-to-suit office buildings (each approximately 15,000 sq.-ft). 



FROM PAGE B14 



TAYLOR: Equal pay examined 



work justifying equal pay? One dri- 
ver has a spotless safety record, 
spends hours maintaining the 
employer's truck and has driving 
habits that save the owner nearly 
10 percent in fuel cost each year. 
The other has had two accidents 
in the past two years and drives 
the dickens out of the truck. Are 
both worth the same money? 

One more scenario. Two retail 
clerks with the same experience and 
education: One is customer service 
focused, the other is looking for a 
real job. Are both worth the same 
pay? 



Equal pay for equal work is a 
good concept mat Is very difficult to 
administer fairly. Not all employees 
are created equal, and not all equal 
work Is equal. Therefore, I think 
our free-market system has done 
pretty well. Yes, there Is still room 
for improvement, and we all should 
work for that 



Don Taylor is the co-author of 
Up Against the Wal-Marts. You may 
write to him in care of Minding Your 
Own Business, PO Box 67, Amarillo, 
TX 79105. 



NEW BUSINESS 



R&S Sports Cards, 1228 Cedar 
Lake Rd., Ste. C, Round Lake 
60073. 546-2273. Leroy Blum. 

Accounting On It, 340 Quist 

Court, Grayslake, 60030. 223- 
7427. Sharlene J. Kranz. 

Branch and Associates -dba- 
Village Green Townhomes, 28955 
Niblick Knoll Ct, Ivanhoe, 60060. 



(Street) P.O. Box 750, Mundelein, 
60060. (mailing) Kenneth Branch, Sr. 
and Dana L Branch. 

First Step Foot Core, 385 West 
Liberty Street, Wauconda 
(60084. 487-2827. James P. Flood 

Personal Touch Residential 
Cleaning Service, 676 

Cheyenne St., Round Lake 



Heights, 60073. 

Cohen Financial, 15714 

Sprucewoad, Libertyvilie, 60048. 
816-1798. Michael Cohen. 

Mama Levas' Home Town 
Dell, 389 Lake St., Antloch 
60002. (physical) 1036 Bishop St., 
Antloch, 60002. (mailing) 395- 
2450. Annamarle Houghton. 



Think overseas at CLC Seminar 



Are you thinking about doing 
business overseas? The small Busi- 
ness Development Center at the 
college of Lake County can help 
you get started. A basic seminar 
on "Starting an Export/Import 
Company" will be offered from 6 
to 9 p.m. Oct 26 In Room C002 at 
CLC's Grayslake Campus, the cost 
is $35. 

Topics covered will include in- 
ternational market research and as- 
sessment; contact development — 



sources and customers; pricing and 
commissions; legal considerations; 
logistics; and methods of payment. 
The program Is offered In coop- 
eration with the College of DuPage's 
International Trade Center, the U.S. 
Small Business Administration and 
the Illinois Department of Com- 
merce and Community Affairs. To 
register, call 543-2003 or fax to 223- 
9371. Visa, MasterCard, American 
Express and Discover will be ac- 
cepted. 



Additional I-PASS only lanes 
planned for Cermak, Irving Park 



Road warriors beware: the Illi- 
nois Toll way Board of Directors has 
taken additional steps to signifi- 
cantly reduce traffic congestion and 
speed motorist movement through 
two heavily utilized toll plazas on 
the central Tri-State. This will be ac- 
complished with a doubling of ex- 
isting I-PASS Only Lane capacity at 
the Cermak Road and Irving Park 
Road Toll Plazas. I-PASS only lanes 
enable I-PASS motorists to pass 
through mainline toll plazas with- 



out stopping to pay tolls. The 
$617,000 contract to construct the 
lanes was awarded to Di vane 
Brothers Electric Company out of 
Franklin Park. 

I -PASS only lanes are capable of 
processing 1,850 cars per hour dur- 
ing peak travel times. Standard au- 
tomatic lanes can process about 80 
cars per hour with the gates in the 
gates in the upright position. Manu- 
al collection lanes can process 
about 300 cars per hours. 



CPA Society pro 
bono division 
helps nonprofits 

Finding funding sources has al- 
ways been a challenge for not-for- 
profit organizations. The number of 
not-for-profit organizations Is on 
the rise, while funding sources and 
contributions are on the decline, 
which results in a larger number of 
nonprofits vying for a cut of a small- 
er financial pie. As a way to assist 
not-for-profit organizations, the Illi- 
nois CPA Society's pro bono division 
— CPAs for the Public Interest (CPA 
sPI) — recently introduced its new, 
comprehensive series of financial 
management seminars. 

On October 14, CPAsPI will host 
its "QuickBooks for Nonprofits" 
workshop. The class, which falls un- 
der the "Beyond Basic Recordkeep- 
ing" category of the CPAsPI Finan- 
cial Management Workshops series, 
will cover QuickBooks" most attrac- 
tive features. 

All CPAsPI Financial Workshops 
will be held at the Illinois CPA Soci - 
ety/Foundauon/CPAsPI office. For 
more information call 312993-0393 
or 800/998-0393 with Illinois. 



"For Intcrnet'Ser^e ThaTs^F-ast & 

Reliable, |&i.th nl^Dli|CT" 



&#*% 



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* 



^ W 



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J" 



BUSINESS BR I EFS 

Robin Coseo joins board of 
Riverside Foundation 

Robin Coseo has been named to the board of di- 
rectors of Riverside Foundation. Coseo Is Presi- 
dent of the Riverside Foundation Auxiliary and 
has chaired its successful annual luncheon. 

Coseo is a graduate of the University of Missouri 
and a resident of Lincolnshire. Headquartered in 
Licolnshire, Riverside Foundation is a not-for- 
profit social service agency, which provides resi- 
dential and development training programs to 
adults with developmental disabilities. 




Coseo 



®/4*~ 



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New design showroom 

Jo Vin Interiors has opened a new showroom on Stonington Road just 

east of Banington Road off of the Hassel Road. 
The store features state-of-the-art facility features window coverings 
and treatments, floor coverings (include wood, marble, granite, slate, 
and carpeting], art work, accessories, and even kitchen and bath 
suites. 

Free interviewing workshop 

People looking for a job won't want to miss a free workshop about in- 
terviewing skills from 9 to 1 1 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19 at the Illinois Em- 
ployment and Training Center, 4 15 Washington St., Waukegan. " 
isap 
whil 
Center. 



This 



i great opportunity for someone who has not been job seeking for a 
lie," said Eva Oberdier of the Illinois Employment and Training 



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New on Woodlands staff 

Ellen Hines of Libertyvilie is the new assistant librarian at Woodlands 

Academy of the Sacred Heart, Lake Forest. Her background includes 
library services at Carmel High School, Mundelein. Among other new 
Woodlands faculty are Amy Isaac of Libertyvilie, Spanish teacher; Su- 
san McCormick of Grayslake, mathematics teacher, and Becky Am- 
bacher of Antioch, houseparent. Ambacher is a 1996 graduate of the 
school. 

Regulation Department actions 

Jerry I. Sarcia of Libertyvilie, a public accountant, was fined $30,000 
and had his license Indefinitely suspended by the Illinois Dept. of Pro- 
fessional Regulation after being criminally convicted for interfering 
with the International Revenue Service. Jamie Demoleczny of Round 
Lake Beach was denied permanent registration and no longer can 
practice under provisions of the Private Detective, Private Alarm, Pri- 
vate Security and Locksmith Act. 



to give us HOT NEWS TIPS 
call Lakeland Newspapers at 223-8073 

You can leave your name and number or remain anonymous. 
Leave a message and we'll check it outl 





i!£*jiI»Mol!IS* 



B 1 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



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October 8, 1999 



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Newspapers 



Section 



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COUNTY DIGEST 



tf ******* *t**+*++*+***im+t*#*ti*i» 4 *t 



Adams seeks senate 

Tom Adams announced he is 
nmriinf; in the March 21 Republican 
Primary for Illinois Senate In the 30th 
District for t,hc opportunity to chal- 
lenge State Sen. Terry Unk (D-Vemon 
Hills). 

Adams, 61, Is mayor of Green 
Oaks, a member of the Lake County 
Republican Central Committee and a 
senior executive atTrustmarfc Insur- 
ance Company in Lake Forest 

Walk for literacy set 

Literacy Volunteers of Lake 
County's third walk for literacy will be 
4iHd on Saturday, Oct 2 at the Van 
Patten Woods, just west of ZIon on 
Howies 11 and 173. 

Registration for the event begins 
at 8 a.m. Each participant who gener- 
ates S25 In pledges receives a Walk for 
ljteracy t-shirt. Additionally, with 
each $10 pledged, participants get a 
raffle ticket good for various prizes. 

Crane wants 
wetlands funding 

U.S. Rep. Phil Crane (R-Palaiine) 
was instrumental in obtaining House 
approval for on aditionai S1.075 mil- 
lion necessary to complete the Dcs 
Plaincs River Wetlands Demonstra- 
tion project. 

"Not only has the Des Plaines 
Wetlands project already given us sub- 
stantial dividends, but by giving us the 
tools (a protect valuable wetlands and 
prevent future flooding, well be saving 
the taxpayers much more money In 
the future," Crane said. 




m&$ 




Governor's anti-tollway remarks 
embolden critics of Lake County project 



The Veteran's Administration Medical Center in North Chicago is 
currently being threatened by proposed cuts in medical services 
to local veterans. It promises to be a much lonelier building If all 
inpatient services are moved to other facilities in the Chicagoland 
area.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

Veterans planning rally 
at North Chicago VA 



By JOHN R0SZK0WSK1 
Regional Editor 



THIS WEEK 



CHEERING SECTION 

Celebrating the 
high school 
cheerleaders 
of Lake 
County 

SEE 
PAGES 
C14& 

C15 



GRIDIRON REVIEW 

How the teams are 
doing midseason 

SEE PAGE 
C13 & C16 




Lake County veterans arc plan- 
ning a rally at the North Chicago 
Medical Center Oct. 16 to protest 
proposed drastic cuts In medical ser- 
vices. 

"Our effort is to try to get the 
word out to everyone to try to save 
our facility, " said Johnnie Alien, su- 
perintendent of the Veterans Assis- 
tance Commission of Lake County. 

"The" commission Is working in 
conjunction with local veterans 
groups to coordinate the rally. Letters 
have been sent out to veterans about 



the rally and fliers arc being posted in 
prominent locations. 

The rally will be held at 1 p.m. 
Oct. 16 on the grounds of the North 
Chicago VA campus. 

Several local, state and national 
dignitaries have been invited 'to at- 
tend, Allen said, but he has not con- 
firmed as of yet who will be on hand. 

Allen hopes for a large turnout at 
the rally, perhaps in die thousands of 
people: 

"Based upon the communica- 
tions we've already made and plan to 
make, I'm expecting a big turnout. 

Please seeVA/ CIO 



Route 55 study 
moving forward 




e concerns 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 
Regional Editor 



A study of die proposed Route 53 
highway and other transportation al- 
ternatives continues to move for- 
ward as planned, although the direc- 
tion might not be as dear as original- 
ly thought 

. Critics of die Route 53 extension 
were delighted over Gov. George 
Ryan's recent comments expressing 
concern oyer the possible negative 
environmental impacts of a new 
highway. 

However; a top official for the 
Lake County Transportation Im- 
provement Project said their study 
continues to review all of die pro- 
posed highway options— and they 



have received no instructions from 
the state Department of Transporta- 
tion to the contrary. 

"We have not been directly con- 
tacted about any change in plans," 
said Dave Lutyens, director of the 
Lake County Transportation. Im- 
provement Project "Our study is re- 
ally about (reducing} traffic conges- 
tion in Lake County and we're pro- 
ceeding with our study. 

"We work for die governor and 
we will do what we're instructed to do 
by his office, but right now, we're pro- 
ceeding with the study," he added, 

Lutyens noted Route 53 is among 
tile alternatives being studied but 
many other options are also being 

. Please see ROUTE 53 /CIO 



Balanced budget provides 
good news for millennium 

Budget includes additional money 
to expand sheriff's patrols, security 

million budget outlay for fiscal 2000 
will be balanced, with projected rev- 
enues in line with expenditures. 

"The county is in very strong fi- 
nancial condition," said Nollenberg- 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKI 

Regional Editor 



Fox Waterway Agency 
approves hike in user fees 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKJ 
Regional Editor 



Lake County is moving forward 
into the new millennium with some 
good financial news: It appears the 
county will not be facing a budget 
deficit in die coming year. 

Lake County Administrator Karl 
Nollenberger said die county's $316 



er. 



Nollenberger presented a first 
look at the new budget during the 

Please see BUDGET iCIQ 



. Boaters will have to pay a little 
more to use die Fox Chain O* Lakes 
next year, and not everyone is happy 
about it 

By a 4-1 vote, the Fox Waterway 
Agency Board of Directors approved 
fee increases for boats and other wa- 
tercraft that use the Chain and me 
Fox River. 

The waterway agency approved 
die fee increases after a public hear- 
ing at the Fox Waterway offices in Fox 
Lake. About 40 people attended the 
hearing to express opinions or con- 
cerns about the fee increases. 

Linda Ryckman, a spokesman 
for the FoxWaterway Agency, said the 
fee increases are me first the agency 
has sought since 1996.She noted that 
boater license fees provide for about 
90 percent of die agency's revenue, 
with only 10 percent coming from 



state sources. 

Theagencyhasa 51 .2 million an- 
nual budget, with about 90 percent 
of the agency's revenue coming from 
boater fees and only aliout 10 per- 
cent from die state. The fee in creases 
are expected to raise about $450,000 
in additional revenue, according to 
Ryckman. The agency board is ex- 
pected to finalize some minor details 
of the fee schedule when it meets 
Oct 28. 

Ryckman said the fee increases 
will allow the agency to hire addi- 
tional staff for the agency's dredging 
projects, as well as debris removal, 
buoy replacements and routine 
maintenance of die waterway. It will 
also provide the agency with some 
addiUonal funds for me "purchase of 
disposal sites for our dredging mate- 
rials," she said. Currendy, dredged 
materials have to be hauled away at 



Please see 



I CIO 



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C2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



October 1 , 1999 



County^T^^oad program set 

RecQght£es co0!Mirig^e$d for land additions 

Despite an increase by Sfftnillipn 



from last year, Lake Cc-urityVjQst up 
dated five-year highway Improvement 
program totaling $109 million due to 
increased state and federal aid will not 
allow the county enough money for 
needed lane additions. 

"The increase from the Gover- 
nor's Illinois FIRST package will have 
to be used to provide die county's 
share of (he Increased JDOTroad pro- 
gram involvingstate and county inter- 
sections. Unless more is done, this will 
still leave motorists on county roads 
experiencing continued increasing 
levels of congestion," Board Chair Jim 
LaBelle said. 

LaBelle explained that the County 
Board presented its Action Plan for 
Congestion Mitigation to the Illinois 
General Assembly. The action plan 
identified an additional 46 projects at 
a cost of $128 million that are needed 
to address the congestion issue. The 
Illinois House passed a fundingmech- 
anism to present to the voters but the 
legislation still needs approval by the 
Illinois Senate. More specifically, the 
idea of Lake County having a one- 
quarter cent sales tax has been dis- 
cussed. 

Lake County Division of Trans- 
• portation director Martin Buehler stat- 
ed that travel on county roads has in- 
creased 56 percent while road widen- 
ingsareuponly 15 percent since 1990. 
"The result is an astonishing increase 
in congested road mileage of 237 per- 
cent," Buehler said. 

While the congestion issue of the 
1999-2003 program looks bleak, mo- 
torists will notice work being done in 
other transportation categories, noted 
Lake County Public Works and Trans- 
portation Committee Chair bonnie 
Thomson Carter, who explained the 



' county's philosophy is that funding 
must first go toward keeping roads in 
good condition, addressing safety 
concerns and removing traffic bottle- 
necks throughout the county: 

Carter said that about 21 percent 
of the county's funding $22 million- 
arc allocated toward eradicating traf- 
fic bottlenecks. "Two good examples 
of traffic bottlenecks that will be re- 
duced in the next five years arc the in- 
tersection of Wilson Road and Route 
134 in Inglesidc and Gilmer Road and 
Route 176 in Hawthorn Woods," she 
explained. 

Public Works and Transportation 
Vice Chair Pamela Newton, who also 
is the Northeastern Illinois Planning 
commission representative, said, "The 
program we have developed has 117 
projects totaling $46 million toward 
keeping roads In good condition. An 
example is the repaying on the first 



four-lane roadway the county built In 
1978 on Rpllins Road in Round Lake 
Beach. While we need more four-lane 
roads, we will not let the existing roads 
fall apart." 

The program docs provide for 4. 6 
miles of county highways to be 
widened to four lanes including por- 
tions of Buttcriicld Road In Mundelein 
and Washington Street in Third Lake. 

Division ofTransportation Director 
Buehler said that the county will start 
the time-consuming advance engi- 
neering work on nearly six miles of oth- 
er add -lane projects on the following; 
Rollins Road between Route 83 to Route 
45; Sunset Avenue between Delancy 
Road to Route 131; and Washington 
StrectbetweenRoute83toRoule45. . 

"If additional funding should 
come our way in the next five years, wc 
want to be ready to start construc- 
tion," Buehler concluded. 



The highway improvement program includes: 



• The program covers the 270 miles 
of roads under Lake County jurisdic- 
tion. 

• It takes several years to advance a 
highway project through die stages in 
which roadway design, drainage, en- 
vironmental and public coordination 
issues are addressed. 

• The level of infrastructure invest- 
ment supports 2,600 jobs. 

• Expenditures are listed for plan- 
ning, engineering, right of \vay and 
construction activities. 

• The program is divided into four 
main areas: 

• Rehabilitation to keep county 
highways in good condition ($46.2 
million - 42 percent of program 
funds) 

• Capacity to meet travel demands 



($35 million— 32 percent) 

• Operational to reduce traffic bot- 
tlenecks ($22.5 million —21 percent) 

• Safety to address safety concerns 
($5.4 million— 5 percent) 

• There arc 214 individual projects 
in die program. 

• The average county highway 
pavement ride quality is expected to 
maintain its current good condition. 

•The program includes the re- 
placement of the MHlburn Road 
bridge over Mill Creek built in 1943. 

• The County Board sets project 
priorities and funding in the annual 
budget and appropriation approval 
process. 

For more information, contact the 
Lake County Division of Transporta- 
tion at 362-3950. 




THE YWCA OF LAKE COUNTY 



YWCA 



77 Years ofSewicc to the 
Lake County Community 



Last Year 1,500 Parents Called the YWCA for Child Care! 
Were YOU Listed on the YWCA Data Base for Referrals? 

S If you are currently a Child Care Provider 

S If you would like to become a Child Care Provider 

CALL the YWCA for Information on: 

•FREE Listing on the DataBase For Parent Referrals 
•Spring Training Class Schedules 
•How to Start a Child Care Business Class 
•Access to Toy and Equipment Lending Library 
•Access to Video and Resourse Library 
•Technical Assistance - Phone and On-Site 
•Networking with other Child Care Specialists 

We are the source of your child care needs! 

YWCA OF LAKE COUNTY 

Child Care Resource & Referral Program 

2133 Belvidere Road, Waukegan, IL 60085 

(847) 662-4247 Fax: (847) 662-4752 



March 2000 election 
petitions circulating 

Clerk urges candidates: Know the rules 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
Regional Editor 



The campaign season has offi- 
cially begun In Lake County, and 
County Clerk Wlllard Hclander ad- 
vises candidates to carefully follow 
the election rules when circulating 
their petitions. 

Sept. 21 was the first day for Lake 
County candidates from established 
political parties and Independent 
candidates to circulate petitions for 
the March 2000 primary elections. 

Helandersaid the County Clerk's 
office offers a complimentary sum- 
mary candidates guide, detailing the 
necessary information for prospec- 
tive candidates. The guide Is a syn- 
posis of the candidates guide provid- 
ed by the Illinois State Board of Elec- 
tions and includes the legal calendar, 
petitions requirements and general 
filing information. 

Sometimes candidates aren't 
aware of all the election rules. Failure 
to follow the rules can result in a le- 
gal challenge and a candidate getting 
thrown off the ballot, so It's impor- 
tant for candidates to be aware of all 
the rules, Hclander said. 

"We want to wam people these 
are common mistakes and we don't 
want them to makd them," said He- 
lander. 



Some of the common mistakes 
candidates make in circulating their 
petitions include improper number- 
ing of petition pages, pages that 
aren't properly attached or of the 
same size, and circulating petitions 
without a witness present 

Hclander said all the petition 
sheets should be of the some size (i.e., 
8 1/2 by 1 1 Inches), sheets should be 
stapled together and numbered in the 
proper sequence. There should also be 
a notarized signature at the bottom of 
all page of the individual who circulat- 
ed the petition, she said. 

Petition packets can be picked 
up at the customer service counter at 
the County Clerk's Office until the 
last day of filing on Dec 20. They ore 
also available at the county clerk's 
websidc at 

h Up./ / www.co.lakc.fl.us/cntycUc 

Filing of petitions starts on Dec 
14 and runs through Dec. 20. 

The. county offices to be nomi- 
nated in the March 21, 2000 primary 
election include: Circuit County 
Clerk, Coroner, Recorder, State's At- 
torney, County Board members from 
Districts 3, 4, 5, 6, 13, 17, 19, 22, and 
North Shore Sanitary District 
Trustees from Districts 1 and 4. All 
precinct commitmen offices will also 
be elected during the general prima- 
ry election. 



Revisions to water well 
ordinance now in effect 



Revisions to the Lake County 
Board of Health Ordinance Article 
XV, which regulates water wells, be- 
came effective Sept -1. The Lake 
County Board approved the revisions 
earlier this year, capping off two- plus 
years of work on the ordinance. 

Most of the changes in the ordi- 
nance arc procedural, and primarily 
concern the permitting, construction 
and operation of water wells. The sig- 
nificant changes in Article XV In- 
clude: 

Well repair permits are no longer 
required. However, when a water 
well contractor repairs a water well, 
he is required to submit a water sam- 
ple result. The sample does not need 
to be satisfactory. The Lake County 
Health Department/ Community 
Health Center will follow up on all 
unsatisfactory results. A non-com- 
plying form will be available for con- 
tractors to submit when homeown- 
ers refuse to have a sample collected 
or choose to collect it themselves. 



. Shared water well systems arc al- 
lowed provided the legalities (such as 
easements, continued use agree- 
ments, maintenance, etc) are all 
worked out, 'documented and 
recorded with the property deeds. A 
variance is still required. 

When a water well is constructed 
to withdraw water from a deeper for- 
mation, the upper water bearing for- 
mations must be excluded by grout- 
ing casing or a liner in place. 

All water samples must be col- 
lected from either a permanently 
mounted sink, or from a smooth, 
non-threaded spigot located adja- 
cent to the pressure tank, at least IB 
Inches off the floor. 

The requirement to obtain a vari- 
ance to construct a non-potable wa- 
ter well where community water is 
available was removed. 

Alterations to properties arc pro- 
hibited where the project violates re- 
quired setback distances to existing 
water wells. 



PMNIUm 




FIRST STATE BANK OF ROUND LAKE 



**ANH<^ 




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receive a gift certificate 

for $10.00 redeemai3le at any participating 

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MAIN OFFICE: 

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Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

(847) 540-2111 





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BRANCH OFFICE: 

Avilon & Goodnow Blvds. 
Round Lake, IL 



(847) 540-8444 



UNDER 






■ \ 



\ 



. 






October 1, 1999 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers I C3 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



■ 






■ 






Washington road nearing completion 

Gurnee— The back-ups on Washington Street will soon 
come to an end. 

According to officials from the Lake County Division of 
Transportation, the patching repairs on Washington Street 
arc ahead of schedule. The project Is likely to be completed by 
Oct. 9 rather than the original projected dale of Oct. 15. 

The outside lanes of Washington Street have been closed 
since Sept. 15fromGrecnlcafAvcnuetoRoutc21 as part of 
stage one of the project. Stage two of the project, which in- 
cludes the moving of traffic from the inside to the outside 
lanes, was to begin on Sept. 29 or 30. 

The speed limit of 50 miles per hour has been temporari- 
ly reduced to 45 miles per hour during the construction peri- 
od. 

Village to celebrate anniversary 

Mundelein— The village of Mundeleln has reached a 
milestone. 

On Oct. 2, the village will celebrate Its 90th anniversary 
during a special ceremony at the Fort Hill Heritage Museum, 
GO IE. Noel Drive. 

The ceremony, which begins at 1 1 a.m., will feature ap- 
pearances by Mayor Marilyn Sindles, Mundelein Girl Scouts 
and the Brass Symposium of the North Shore. 

Another highlight of the ceremony will be the unveiling 
of the community portrait, which was taken on Sept. 19. It is a 
unique item which Mundelein MainStrect Executive Director 
John Maguire said will serve as a tribute to the village's 90th 
anniversary. 

Fire station to be dedicated 

Antioch— Dedication ceremonies for the second Antioch 
Fire Department District 1 station are scheduled for Sunday 
afternoon. Oct. 3. 

The new station, to be named after Tod Maplethorpe, re- 
tired chief, is located on Deep Like Road Just north of Depot 
Street on the village's cast side. 

Among those planning to attend are Congressman Phillip 
Crane, Antioch Mayor Marilyn Shineflug along with 
Maplethorpe, his wife, Carol, and many of their family mem- 
bers. 

Other local village, township and fire district officials have 
been invited, along with various state legislative representa- 
tives. An open house will be held at the station 1230-4 p.m. 

The actual dedication ceremony will be at 130 p.m. 

« 

Six arrested for bomb threats 

Round Lake— Five individuals were arrested for making 
a bomb threat to Round Lake High School Sept. 21. All are 16, 
except for 17-year-old Arturo Mcrcado, of Round Lake Beach, 
who was held for $25,000 bond after being charged with disor- 
derly conduct, a Class 4 felony that could carry jail time. 

A IG-year-old male was arrested Sept. 22 after police 
questioning. He confessed to calling in the threat on Sept. 22 
from a pay phone as part of a group initiation. The juvenile, 
who had been out of school for a year, has been charged with 
disorderly conduct. 

New Kohl's to open 

Round Lake Beach— The new Kohl's department store 
in Round Like Reach will have its grand opening on Oct. 8 at 8 
a.m. The store Is located at 2330 Rollins Road. 

Community dignitaries will be in attendance for a ribbon 
cutting ceremony scheduled for 7:45 a.m. 

Grand opening festivities include a $500 shopping spree 
sweepstakes on Oct. 8 and 9. 

Angelica from Nickelodeon's "Rugrats" will meet and 
greet customers on Oct. 9 from noon until 2 p.m. 

Power Breakfast to be held 

Wadsworth— The topic of criminal liability for business 
owners will be explored at the Oct. 6 Lake County Power 
Breakfast at Midlane Golf Resort at 7:30 a.m. 

Panelists include Lake County Slate's Attorney Mike 
Waller, former U.S. Attorney Fred Foreman and Vernon Hills 
Village President Roger Byrne, who is an authority on the in- 
surance industry. 

. The Lake County Power Breakfast is open to the public 
the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30 a.m. at Midlane 
Golf Resort at 4555 West Yorkhouse Road in Wadsworth. For 




Five-year-old Nick Pilcher, whose mom Is a District 41 
teacher in Lake Villa, helps support the teachers In 
getting a new and fair contract during a rally outside 
district offices Tuesday.— Photo by Lynn Gunnarson 
Dahtstrom 



reservations, contact Midlane Golf Resort at 360-0550. 

Boating accident fatal for woman 

Fox Lake— A 34 year-old from Antioch, Sharryl (Howard) 
Peterson, died from injuries sustained in a late-night crash on 
Sept. 24 on Fox Lake. 

The boats were comparable in size, according to Lake 
County Coroner's office. Head injuries was listed as cause of 

death. 

One boat, driven by Thomas Beran, of Chicago, allegedly 
struck the boat Peterson was a passenger in. The accident took 
place at 10:35 p.m. near Indian Point. 

Township board opposes plant 

Libertyville— After many months of debate, the Libertyville 
Township Board issued a unanimous resolution slating its op- 
position to the proposed Indeck power plant at its Sept, 23 
meeting. Trustees received applause from audience members 
and tried to hide the smiles that leapt to their faces. 

"Let's tell Indeck to build the plant in their own backyard in 
Buffalo Grove and see how that works." said Trustee Thomas 
Lynch. 



The sentiment was echoed by everyone at the meeting, 
Including Libertyville resident Mike Bennigan, who works in 
the power industry. 

"Make them take a rural site where there's a buffer, not 
right near a community. That's insane," said Bennigan. 

Property values have risen again 

Libertyville— According to Libertyville Township Asses- 
sor Peggy Freese, Libertyville property values have risen once 
again. 

"Sales show that Libertyville Is still a hot market area," said 
Freese. 

The downtown area saw one of the largest increases In 
property values. People moving to Libertyville are willing to 
buy older homes and spend a great deal of money fixing them 
up in order to live near downtown. 

"Properties are selling at higher prices than they were as- 
sessed at," said Freese. 

Lake Villa teachers rally 

Lake Villa— District 41 teachers have agreed to make one 
last attempt to avert a strike. Teachers will meet with the 
school board and a mediator on Oct 1 3. • 

Teachers had assured die school board that they will not 
strike before their next meeting. 

Teachers held their first mass rally on Sept. 29 in front of 
the District 41 central administrative building. Following the 
rally teachers, a mediator and the school board met to negoti- 
ate an agreement. Dan Venturi, school board spokesman said 
that the board has made a proposal to offer a retirement in- 
centive plan but the two panics are still far apart on the issue 
of salary. 

On Sept. 29, after rallying at the William L Thompson 
School die teachers met to vote on a strike to see what action 
will be taken if Oct. 13 negotiations arc unsuccessful. 

Westlake reunites campuses 

Gurnee — Westlake Christian Academy (WCA) has re- 
united both of its Lake County campuses to one location in 
Gurnee. 

The sixth through 12th grade students, who attended 
classes at 1630 23rd Sl in Son, have been moved to the el- 
ementary building, located at 940 N. Kilbourne Road in 
Gurnee; 

"There was plenty of room (in Ziortl . but we wanted 
both schools together," said Cheryl Clark, business manag- 
er for die academy, "We wanted lo. reunite everybody." 
Now, the school's 204'siudents'are all wuhln one 

building. 

"It makes things a lot easier," said Clark. 

The WCA, which has just begun its 28th year, opened 
in Gurnee last year. It was founded In 1 973 by a group of 
parents under the name of Waukegan Christian School. 
The school became WCA five years ago. 

WCA is a non-denominational Christian school which 
serves more than 13 communities. It has been experienc- 
ing growth in Gurnee, Wadsworth and Grayslake in recent 
years. 

For information on enrollment, call 244-7815. 

Board approves development 

Mundelein— The Ashbrook Senior Housing Commu- 
nity will now be part of Mundelein, thanks to a favorable 
vote by the village board. 

At its latest meeting, the village board voted unani- 
mously to grant a zoning change for the Ashbrook develop- 
ment, to be located on Midlothian Road near Cambridge 
Country Homes. The zoning of the land will change from 
R-l and R-4 to multi-family R-8. 

The community, which was proposed by Peter Feurich 
of 2000 Millennium Corporation, vvould consist of 60 con- 
dominium units and 90 assisted-Iiving units. 

The approval of the development, however, did not 
come without some discussion amongst village trustees. 

Board members were worried that the project would 
not reach completion. 

Feurich said he has worked on "half a dozen" other 
projects, which he has completed 100 percent. 

"Feurich and his corporation have relaxed my con- 
cerns about that," said Trustee Kenneth Kessler. 




Ti 



" *~^n 



• 



■ 





Pick up any of Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 editions in coming weeks for: 



CLOSE TO HOME 

VA cuts would affect 25.000 vets. 
— County 



FOOD FOR THOUGHT 

Lake County Health Department's new food 
inspection program gets high maiks 



* 




NIGHTLIFE 

A look at Lake 

County's booming 

nightlife. 

— Lakellfe 



■■ '- 



- 




C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



October 1,1999 



Lakeland Newspapers 



William H. Schroeder 

Publlihor 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/ 
Operation! Manager 



Robert Warde 

News Editor 



5 



30 South Whitney St., Graysloke, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (047) 223-0161. E-mail: cdlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 

■ 

It's our season 
whether or not 

Now that the summer of '99 is history— the miilcnium sum- 
mer, no less— let's face it. Summer was pretty ordinary by 
plain old northeastern Illinois standards. July heat. Burned 
out lawns by August. Droopy blooms. Thank-God- for-air 
conditioning nights so we could sleep. 

We can't brag about winter, certainly. Our Januarys can stack up 
with any blizzards bruising across the Dakotas or northern Minneso- 
ta. As we found out again this year, July here can hold its own with any 
temperatures the weatherman can toss at Phoenix (or Fort Laud- 
erdale, depending on the dew point). And, spring. Picture a "delight- 
fully misty" day in Seattle when rain gear and umbrellas are a must. 
That's us in March, April and May. Ugh! 

But, fall. Ahh. That's where we shine. Fall is distinctively ours. Fall 
in Lake County. A unique experience. Delightfully sunny days, crisp, 
clear nights. Northern Illinois can be positively enchanting from mid- 
September until late October. A poet wrote about "October's bright 
blue weather." Was the writer referring to our town? 

Try and top a weekend hike through Van Patten Woods or Ryerson. 
Sweater weather for Friday night football or a 9 a.m. pee wee gridiron 
"classic." We especially like Sunday drives on Fairfield , Gilmer, St 
Marys, Sheridan or Wadsworth Roads, to check out the fall foliage. 
What's even more fun is the discovery of a still rural byway somewhere 
in the county where you can savor a warm Sunday afternoon and the 
colors. Shhh. Don't tell. Stop at a roadside stand or an orchard to buy 
some pumpkins, a jug of fresh cider or an armful of gladiolas. 

You can probably tell we've got a crush on October in Lake Coun- 
ty. It's grand and glorious. Enjoy. 

Gun show exit 
more than adieux 

Given the anti-gun mentality in U.S. today, chances arc there 
won't be little more than a murmur, if that, with a well-re- 
ceived, popular gun show at the Like County Fairgrounds 
being phased out. 

This is a classic case of not so much what is happening, but how it 
is happening and why it is happening. Call the forced exiting of the 
gun show a version of book burning. Is that too strong a metaphor? 
Excuse our indelicate choice. Book burning gets the stomachs churn- 
ing of Americans who believe in the Constitution, freedom of choice, 
free enterprise, due process and the other bedrock principals of our 
nation. . 

As we understand the situation, members of the Grayslake Village 
Board are invoking their municipal powers to rid the community of an 
enterprise considered dangerous and unsafe. There is no record to 
show that the gun show sponsors, who rent space from the Lake 
County Fair Assn., have broken any laws. There have been no "inci- 
dents" at the show conducted periodically at the fairgrounds for a 
number of years. In fact, the show complies with federal and state reg- 
ulations. 

This is no shoot-out in the OK corral.The gun show operators will 
be able to complete the terms of their current rental with the fair asso- 
cation before leaving virtually unnoticed. Underlying the gun show 
departure is an agreement between the Grayslake board and fair- 
grounds managers that the fair association will receive zoning author- 
ity from the village board to expand much needed parking in return 
for getting rid of the gun show. This sccnerio might be an over-simpli- 
fication, but that's how the tit or tat arrangement works out. 

There's an uncomfortable chill in the air about the whole deal. The 
ingredients include a law abiding enterprise, die fair association's 
need to be a good neighbor and the desire of local officials to be 
proactive In the face of a frightened society over a gun culture under 
assault. 

What's so disquieting is the script has been written for economic 
"cleansing." lust fill in the blanks for the next business enterprise to be. 
handed a ticket to leave town. That's what's so disquieting. 

Care for animals 

It seems to be that time of year, with autumn here and shorter 
daylight hours, more and more "road kill" is seen along the roads. 
In a short span of less than a mile on Rte 45, a deer, raccoon, 
skunk, fox and squirrel were all seen either in the road or on the 
shoulder. 

First off, if you hit an animal, and with a deer one would certainly 
think you would notice, stop and check die animal out, at least from 
within your vehicte. In the case of smaller animals, they may become 
aggressive if injured, so the safest place may be within your vehicle. 
- Then, either from a cell phone or the nearest telephone, notify the 




VIEWPOINT 



Greats aplenty; 
Cubs still mine-run 



■ 



Please sec ANIMALS /C5 



Don't laugh. The all-century 
Cubs team, introduced 
last weekend as die millc- 
nium closed out at 
Wrigley Field, contains truly great 
players. 

The Cubs would have won a 
flock of pennants and their share of 
World Series if only some of those 
guys could have played together. If 
there is a consistent problem for the 
Chicago Nationals It's that they can't 
seem to get enough good players in 
quantity to provide a workmanlike 
support cast for their stars. That, 
and an uncanny propensity for trad- 
ing away future stars. 

But that's a management— and 
ownership — problem. More about 
that in a bit. 

Cub greats of the 1900's will 
match up with those of any other 
team except, of course, the hallowed 
Yankees who are in a class by them- 
selves. 

- Can't argue with the century's 
top Cubs, many of whom were on 
hand for ceremonies closing out the 
1999 season. Cub faithful (your 
writer included) can rapture for 
hours over Andre Dawson, Ernie 
Banks, Sammy Sosa, Billy Williams, 
Ron Santo, Fergic Jenkins, Mark 
Grace, Ryne Sandberg, Andy Pafko, 
Lee Smith and Bruce Sutter, all con- 
tinuing to enjoy life and attendees. 
Also included on die team were 
Grover Alexander, Mordecai Brown, 
Joe Tinker, Hack Wilson, manager 
Frank Chance, and Cubs this gray- 
beard followed over die years, Gab- 
by Hartnett, Phil Cavanetta, Charlie 
Grimm and Billy Herman. 

Sour grapes time. The list should 
have included Lou Brock and Greg 
Maddux. Maybe Rafael Palmeiro. 
They're Cooperstown players the 
Cubs let slip away because of, well, 
"Cubness," the uncanny, unexplain- 
able inability to recognize and retain 
great talent. Obviously, the club has 
conslstenUy erred over the years in 
evaluating personnel able to attain 
"good player" status, the hallmark of 
consistent winners. 

A closing word about my choice 
for probably the best Cub team, 
man for man, of the century, the 
193B National League champs. Cen- 
tury greats from that team were 
Gabby Hartnett, Phil Cavarretta, Bil- 
ly Herman and Stan Hack. They I 
were supported by crafty Charlie 
Root, Big Bill Lee, Dizzy Dean and 
lefty Larry French, all pitchers. Other 
fine players included Billy Jurges 
and rraiikic Demcree. 

The outstanding 1938 Cub 
squad had the misfortune of run- 
ning into a Yankee team loaded with 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



stars, missing only Babe Ruth. I'd be 
delighted to hear from true blue Cub 
faithful who would like to give their 
choice for Cub team, man for man, 
of the century. 

So it's on to 2000. "Wait until 
next year." Isn't that the way it al- 
ways is? 

Happy birthday 

Sunday, Sept 26, was a mile- 
stone birthday for our favorite Lake 
County historian, Virginia Park, who 
marked 90 years. Virginia, a newspa- 
per columnist whose history of Long 
Grove, Lake Zurich and southwest 
Lake County is a definitive work, cel- 
ebrated with a heavy heart. She still 
is adjusting to the loss of her life's 
partner, BUI, who passed away at 92 
in June. They setded in Long Grave 
60 years ago as newlywcds and nev- 
er had another home. The Parks 
were Lake County's original "power 
couple," combining writing, politics 
and community service wiUi style, 
fairness and grace. 

Squirrel food 

Here's a hint for householders 
plagued by "tree rats," the pesky 
squirrels that seem peskier dian ever 



this year with their incessant storage 
work that litters yards and decks. 
The young man at the pet food store 
mentioned, somewhat sheepishly, 
poison peanuts. 
"We don't advertise it, but they 
work," he averred. "And we sell'em." 

Tolhvay 'madness' 

More than a few readers called to 
say this column's support of Gov. 
Ryan's "woodshed" plans for the Illi- 
nois Toll way Authority was off the 
mark. Oh? More facts about the Inef- 
ficient and frequency corrupt agency: 
The tollway spends two and a half 
times more for building a mile of 
highway than docs the Illinois Dept 
ofTransportation (IDOT). Also, the 
tollway agency spends $85 million 
per year to collect and count tolls. 

Bang, bang! 

More than 50 top female 
markswo men will be competing In 
the Sixth Annua] Ladies Shotgun 
Classic Oct. 9 and couples competi- 
tion Oct. 10 at Northbrook Sports 
Club outside of Grayslake. They'll be 
competing for trophies and prizes 
valued in excess of $3,500. Some of 
diem are future Olympians. 

Where's Merit? 

Sportswriters are having a rough 
time situadng the Merit Club on 
Route 21, location of the U.S. 
Women's Open next July 20-23. Late- 
ly they've been placing the luxurious 
private layout in Gurncc. The phone 
directory lists Merit at 17135 W. 
Highway 120, Ubertyville, Technical- 
ly, the club lies within the corporate 
boundaries of Gurnee. Take your 
pick, I guess. No doubt the more 
than 125,000 fans expected will find 
the Merit Club next year, whether it's 
in Gurnee or Ubertyville. 






i 



A 










\** wm ttmrn * 



' ;*1 * ± -++r<-1 »***r -■* 



October 1, 1999 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspu^ers I C5 



PARTY LINES 

* 
PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 

Wood-Garrett tiff could spark feud 



With Republican over* 
tures to get State Rep. 
Susan Garrett (D- 
Lake Forest) to switch 
parties, there arc the makings of a 
feud between the freshman legisla- 
tor and Lt. Gov. Corinnc Wood, 
also a resident of Lake Forest and 
former representative of Garrett's 
district 

Wood says Garrett seriously 
considered changing parties earlier 
this summer. Garrett whose politi- 
cal stock has risen with her aggres- 
sive pursuit of issues, says no way. 

Garrett officially announced for 
re-election last week at a gathering 
of Democrat supporters in a 
Waukcgan restaurant 

When she came on the Lake 
County political scene two years ago 
as an unknown, Garrett presented a 
demure manner. Now she's a whirl- 
wind of activity In the 59th District 
and is easy to spot with a glittering 
red, white and blue blouse sported 
at parades. 

• 

Mayoral candidate 

lira Kelsey, former president 
of the Lake Zurich Chamber of 
Commerce and a well-known 
restaurant operator, is making signs 
and sounds indicating he is interest- 
ed in challenging Mayor Jim 
Krlschlce in 2001. That's a long time 
off, but in Lake Zurich the time be- 
tween campaigns usually is short 

Possible retirement 

Court watchers sec the pro- 
posed three-month suspension 
without pay of Circuit Judge John 
Goshgartan as a prelude to ulti- 
mate retirement after 16 years on 
the bench. 

The 53-year-old jurist has been 
embroiled In a lengthy disciplinary 
action with the Illinois Judicial In- 
quiry Board over an outburst of pro- 




Gairettt Seeing 
things from bom 
sides? 




Krlschke; Faces early 
challenger for 2001 
election 



fanity in open court Goshgarian ad- 
mitted to the charges to spare his 
family from a hearing. 

Sinking trail 

iibertyviile Township trustees 
blew the wiustle on shoddy co n - 
struction of a township bike trail 
through Cuneo property. Engineer 
Lane Kendig found die trail sink- 
ing In wetlands areas. The developer 
left debris scattered along the trail. 

Silent treatment 

When Gumee's Mayor Richard 



Wei ton and village trustees met with 
Lake County's Deputy State's Attor- 
ney Mitchell Hoffman to discuss the 
Illinois Open Meetings Act, they 
were advised to discipline them- 
selves when speaking publicly with 
others. 

"1 cant talk to anybody then," 
quipped Wei ton. 

Off tune 

Illinois Attorney General Jim 
Ryan advised Lake County Coroner 
Barbara Richardson and Circuit 
Court Clerk Salty Coffelt not to quit 
their "day jobs" after they sang a 
tribute to Republican State Senator 
Adeline Geo-Karis at a recent fund- 
raiser In Gumee, 

At the same event, Geo-Karis 
snagged Ryan for the first dance of 
the evening claiming that he Is "one 
of the few state representatives that 
knows how to dance." 

Pack rat 

The Antioch Rotary Gub was 
not a good place to be if one Is a 
member of the Osmond family. 

First, Colleen (Osmond) 
Conarchy was accused of having a 
"dry sense of humor" which she 
quickly retorted she got from her 
father. 

Dad, State Rep. Tim Osmond, 
happened to be in the audience. 
When he Jabbed at Larry Bersie (Ro- 
tary dinner /auction chairman), ' . 
"who's In charge of die auction," 
Bersie quickly responded, "who's our 
state representative." 

Later in the meeting, Bersie 
needed a pen, to which Osmond 
helped him out Bersie noted Os- 
mond must keep things for a long 
dme f because die pen was from 
State Bank of Antioch (now State 
Bank of the Lakes) "with a 708 area 
code" To Osmond's credit at least 
the pen still worked. 



Round Lake city, 
what a concept! 



Imagine a new dry being creat- 
ed right here in our lovely Lake- 
land area, In northwestern Lake 
County— a dry of 38,000 peo- 
ple. Wow! 

Movers and shakers of four vil- 
lages, Round Lake, Round Lake 
Beach, Round Lake Heights and 
Round Lake Park, once again are 
talking about consolidating into one 
municipality. 

It makes a lot of sense to some 
people; after all, the four villages al- 
ready share the same school district, 
the same fine fire department excel- 
lent public library and other munici- 
pal services. Their separate police 
departments work together and 
have the same telephone number. 

The villages have countless 
common interests, including the 
weekly paper, the Round Lake News, 
The area has the same post office, 
zip code, chamber of commerce and 
park district 

Sports fans in the separate com- 
munities cheer fanatically for the 
same high school teams, the Round 
Lake Panthers. They also live and die 
together with the Chicago Cubs, 
Bulls, Blackhawks and Bears (al- 
though a few Green Bay Packer fans 
have infiltrated the area.) 

The villages arc casually known 
as the Heights, the Beach, the Park 
and the Town. Their boundaries are 
vague to many motorists who may 
drive through without knowing 
which village they are in at a given 
moment And they grumble in uni- 
son about the same gridlock. 

The Round Lake area became a 
lure after World War 1, when Chicago 
residents began building summer 
homes around the lake, like at our 
other Lakeland lakes, many summer 
cottages have been renovated Into 
year-around homes. 

The Round Lake area is one of 
the fastest-growing in Lake County, 
from 24,000 population 20 years ago 
to about 38,000 now. It also has be- 
come a marvelous shopping mecca 



M*f*tw»H^*«W*i ii » w»mt wM>ww*»m w<»«iin* *Ow 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



for its own villages and numerous 
nearby communities. 

Developers are barely able to 
meet the demand for hew housing 
In the once-sleepy towns, and the 
housing stock is becoming pricier, 
in 1990 the average home in the 
area sold for about $90,000, but 
new subdivisions are sprouting 
homes starting at $150,000 and 
much more. 

The consolidation concept was 
offered to voters 12 years ago but 
was rejected In a referendum. Fifty- 
six percent of the voters favored the 
idea but it needed a majority in each 
of the villages. Only Round Lake 
Beach, the largest of the four, pro- 
duced a majority. 

A meeting on the resurrected 
plan, open to the public, will be held 
at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct 2, in the 
Round Lake Beach Village Hail. 

There will be opposition. A year 
ago, when Round Lake Beach was 
pondering changing its name, a vil- 
lage trustee said, "We want our own 
identity and need to separate our- 
selves from the other Round Lake 
communities." 

As Rosannc, Rosanna-Dana 
would soy, It's always something." 

If the four villages do manage to 
consolidate, what should it be 
called* Bade In 1989, another time 
when Round Lake Beach was con- 
sidering a name change; one person 
suggested Sleepy Hallow. Another 
suggested Reagan. 

Reagan, Illinois. Has a nice ring 
to it don't you think? It could attract 
national attention as the first town 
named after our 40th president 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



* 

Reply to Mayor Amrich's letter: Village of only people 



I am not surprised about the de- 
velopment along Route 176 to 
Darrcll Road. This County has 
grown very quickly. Route 176 is 
the main road to other exploding 
towns, lt almost makes sense to 
commercialize for the public mass- 
es. 

Do you truly feel this Is what 
your residents need? There are still 
empty storefronts. Even if they were 
filled may I use Gumee as a compar- 
ison? Whenever I drive through 
Gumee mere is more concrete , 



homes and stoplights. How are their 
taxes? Can you assure us that if we 
continue to develop our Village that 
we won't need to pay for yet another 
school, more road repair, and other 
"costs" of getting more humanity 
with our taxes? 

Mayor Amrich, I see your side. 
You have been Mayor for a long time 
and Island Lake, the Village of 
"friendly" people, is finally on the 
map. Granted I am not a politician 
and do not pretend to understand 
the complete picture; but perhaps 



FROM PAGE C4 



ANIMALS: Take care of 
animals along the road side 



local police or sheriffs department, 
or on the Interstates, the state po-. 
lice. They will check on the animals 
condition or make arrangements 
for it to be removed. 

School buses use most of the 
roadways In the area. Children 
should not have to see dead ani- 
mals along the roadside as they are 
on their way to or from schooL 

Another thing to remember, the 
animals are starting to move slower 
because some of them are getting 
heavier so they can survive the win- 
ter months. Please watch out for 
them. Their habitat is getting small- 
er and smaller due to man's inter- 



vention and expansion. 

The animals were h,ere long be- 
fore the homo sapiens arrived. 
Show them the respect they de- 
serve. 

If you spot someone purposely 
running over an animal, get a li- 
cense number and notify the au- 
thorities. Unfortunately, there are 
some people who choose not to 
care for living creatures. 

The same goes on city streets. 
Be careful for cats and dogs who 
sometimes get loose from their 
owners. Remember, they may be a 
little childs pet, which to some peo- 
ple is just like losing a child. 



now is the time to let the soil settle. 
Many people enjoy driving along 
Route 176 and find it relaxing to see 
mature trees and hear the birds. In 
fact, less man a mile away from die 
development I have photographed 
Sandhill Cranes that are endangered 
to this County. Island Lake is a rare 
gem to nature and people. 

My point is this: If land contin- 
ues to be developed in any name, 
we may end up with a Village of 
"only" people and nothing else. 

Dawn Szweda 
Island Lake 



Reform in Congress 

The health of America has never 
been a greater focus in Congress 
than it is today, and for good reason. 
The vast majority of Americans 
agree that significant reforms need 
to be made to the way health insur- 
ers do business today, and Speaker 
Dennis Hastert (R-IU deserves cred- 
it for promising to bring patients' 
rights legislation to the House Door 
this fall. 

However, the House must pass 
"comprehensive patients' rights leg- 
islation and not make the same mis- 
takes as the Senate, which passed a 
weak and unacceptable version of 
patient protection legislation earlier 
this summer. . 

The quality of healthcare Is a 
non-partisan issue. Representative 
* Charles Norwood (R-Ga) and Repre- 
sentative John Dingell (D-MR Is 



introduced HR 2723 which has been 
cosponsored by both Republicans 
and Democrats. HR 2723 delivers 
the strong protections that patients 
need and voters want Doctors will 
be allowed to make medical deci- 
sions. Health plans will be account- 
able for their actions. Patients can 
appeal if their care is delayed or de- 
nied. And, the bill's protections will 
apply to everyone with private 
health insurance. This bipartisan ef- 
fort is dearly a wake-up call to Con- 
gress mat Americans want truly , 
meaningful enactments, not an 
empty "HMO Bill of Rights," 

Needless to say, insurers view 
this legislation as a bitter pill to 
swallow. They are spending over 
$100 million to defeat patients' 



rights legislation because they are 
afraid of letting actual physicians 
make medical decisions. They are 
afraid of giving patients the right to 
appeal, of patients choosing their 
own doctors, and most Importantly, 
of being held accountable for their 
decisions denying patients the care 
they need. 

For the insurers, it's a case of 
dollars first and patients last It's 
time to end the politics of greed, and 
start taking care of Americans again. 
After all, if we don't have our health, 
what else do we have? Urge Con- 
gress to pass this important legisla- 
tion, 

Clair M. Callan, MD, President 
ill Suite Medical Society 



Where to call or write 



President 
William Clinton 

The White House 
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.. 
Washington, DC. 20500 

Vice President 
AlGom 

Old Executive Office Building, 
17th Street and Pennsylvania 
Avenue, NW, 
Washington, D.C. 20501 



United States Senators 

Peter Fitzgerald 
B-40 Dirksen Senate Office Build- 
ing, Washington, DC, 20510; 
(202) 224-2854; tax, (202) 228-1372 
or 230 S. Dearborn St, Room 3900, 
Chicago, IL, 60604; 
(312)886-3506 

Richard Durbin 

■364 Russell Senate Office Building, 
Washington, DC, 20510; 
(202) 224-2152; or 230 S. Dearborn 
St.Room 3392. Chicago, IL, 60604; 
(312)353-4952; 
e-mail: dick@durtAn.8enate.gov: 
Web site: vrvm.senate.gov/durtAh. 










MINDING 
YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



My Dream: To be at 
the front of the room 

I was just 19 when I heard my 
first dynamic professional 
speaker. He spoke to our in- 
surance selling class, and he 
was Inspiring. I can't recall his 
name or what he said, but I do re- 
member wishing that I had his tal- 
ent or gift. 

As I watched and listened to his 
presentation, his commanding 
presence and his rapport with the 
audience, I wanted to be like him. I 
wanted to motivate and inspire. I 
wanted to be a dynamic, highly- 
skilled and polished speaker. I 
wanted to be at the front of the 
room. 

There was only one problem: I 
didn't know how. I didn't even 
know where to start. 

As an inexperienced, 19-year- 
old farm boy there were three barri- 
ers to me accomplishing my dream. 
First, I had nothing to say. Second, 
I had no knowledge of how to cre- 
ate, organize or deliver a speech. 
And, third, I was frightened by the 
thought of speaking to a large group 
of people. So, the dream faded. 

Nearly 20 years later, the dream 
resurfaced. I was working in eco- 
nomic development and was at- 
tending an annual educational con- 
ference. Dr. Arthur L Maltory, then 
head of the Missouri Department of 
Education, was the keynote speaker 
at the conference. 

For 4 5 minutes, Mallory capti- 
vated that room full of professionals 
with a masterful presentation. He 
encouraged. He motivated. He In- 
spired. And most importantly, he 
delivered practical, useful informa- 
tion. When MaJJory finished the au- 
dience rose to its feet and gave him 
a thundering, roof-raising, standing 
ovation. 

I know many members of that 
audience went back to their com- 
munities with a renewed spirit. We 
couldn't do everything, but we 
could do something. We might not 
attain instant economic success, 
but we could begin the process. 

The Dream Returned 

That night I lay awake in my ho- 
tel room. 1 re-ran Mallory's speech 
in my mind. I replayed his opening 
remarks, remembered how he had 
organized his speech into key 
points and recalled how he had 
summarized so effectively. That 
night I decided to become the guy 
at the front of the room. 

For the past 14 years I've fol- 
lowed Uiat dream. 1 accepted every 
opportunity to speak. I joined 
Toastmasters. 1 worked on my con- 
tent and delivery. I tried various 
types of humor and style. I present- 
ed more than 500 talks, speeches 
and seminars before getting paid 
for one. 

Now, as a professional member 
of the National Speaker's Associa- 
tion, I present nearly 100 times each 
year. People pay to hear me, and 1 
love being the guy at the front of the 
room. I am living my dream and 
being paid well to do what 1 want to 
do. 

What's your dream? 

Do you have a dream? Have 
you always wanted to play the pi- 
ano, own your own business or 
write a book? Have you wanted to 
be a nurse, finish your degree or 
travel to all 50 states? If you have an 
unfilled dream that keeps you 
awake at night or haunts you during 
the day, I want to share a simple 
plan of action you can use. 
• Write It down. Write your dream 
as a goal. Make it specific, achiev- 

Please TAYLOR/ C7 




CS/Lakeland Newspapers 



October J, 1999 



Airline industry in flux; U.S. ready for Y2R 



Midwest Express rep optimistic, tells 
Rotary audience of change • 



By MICHAEL H.BABICZ 
Community Editor 



The state of the airline industry at 
the moment Is one of flux. Wait a little 
while and It will probably change. 

That is the word from Dan Con- 
rad, senior account representative for 
Midwest Express Airlines based in 
Milwaukee at Mitchell International 
Airport. Conrad was spoke to the An- 
tioch Rotary Club, sharing his overall 
views on the industry as well as with 
his airline in particular. 

"There are areas of change," Con- 
rad, whose father, Eugene, is a retired 
United Airlines pilot who was based 
at O'Hare International Airport In 
Chicago. 

There's a shifting to smaller 
planes and jets, with 100-150 scats, 
witli more frequency in flights which 
gives travelers more options," Conrad 
said. The move has the airline with 
the smaller planes going on the hour 
to some cities, instead of a larger 350 
seat airplane and only offering the 
service once every three hours. 

An indiciation of the industry's 
movement is a backlog of orders for 
450 jets that have been placed with re- 
gional jet manufacturers that arc due 
to be delivered over the next three 
years. 

A further example is American 
Eagle, American Airline's commuter 
branch, changing over from propeller 
planes to regional jets. 

"For the traveler, increased ser- 
vice is the focus of our airline (Mid- 
west) and the industry," Conrad said. 
"More service with frequent fliers and 
an increase in die level of service to all 
fliers is going to be seen, even with the 
major airlines." 

The result Conrad expects is "bet- 
ter meals on any two-hour or longer 
flights" among other things. 

Midwest is celebrating its 15th 
anniversary as a commercial airliner. 
1 1 was spun off from Kimberly Clark's 
corporate shuttle service, originally 
based in Appleton, Wis. 

"We're adding a couple of air- 
planes and a couple new destina- 
tions," Conrad said, admitting the 
Midwest approach is to take tilings at 
a slow pace. "We want to provide a 
better class of service with more fre- 
quency." 

Despite having purchased eight 
new MD-80 jet airplanes, Midwest is 
electing to put one or two into service 
per quarter. "This is driving the ac- 



'Tltere should not be a problem with 

any of the airports in tlte United 

States. Ifyou'reflying overseas, you 

may make plans to stay a little longer, 

because I'm not sure about how well 

they're prepared.' 

Dan Conrad 
Midwest Express Airlines 



countants crazy because we've got 
this major Investment sitting there, 
but we don't want to expand too 
quickly and end up being out of busi- 
ness." 

An example of Midwest's idea is 
to offer 20 flights to New York from 
the Chicago area on a daily basis. 
Overall, Midwest flies to 35 cities with 
its jet service. The commuter side, 
Skyway, has 
19 passen- 
g e r 
Bcachcraft 
airplanes 
that are 
used on 
shuttle runs 
to cities sur- 
rounding 
the Great 
Lakes. 

"- W e 
want to keep fares relatively the 
same," Conrad added. "We want to 
stay focused on the customer." 

As he glanced at the "four-way" 
Ilotary test, Conrad said his airline 
uses a very similar philosophy. "Is it 
die truth and fair to all concerned, will 
it build good will between the airline 
and its customers and staff, is it ben- 
eficial to the company, stockholders 
and customers," Conrad said. 

Eventually, persons choosing to 
fly will have an opportunity to go into 
more airports, some even in the 
smaller cities. "There's going to be 
more destinations, with some cities 
maybe ending up widi propeller ser- 
vice instead of people having to drive 
100 miles to an airport with a con- 
necting flight," Conrad said. 

"People in this area are kind of 
spoiled with O'Hare, arguably the 
largest or second largest airport, de- 
pending upon the time of year and 
who docs the calculating, splitting the 
tide with Atlanta," Conrad said. "For 
people in the Milwaukee area, if 
there's not a service or a connection, 
it means you have to drive to Chica- 
go." 

"That will change as regional jets 
become more prominent," Conrad 
added. 

Regarding the future of pilots, 
Midwest has added five regional jets 
this year and intends to add more. 
This will result in fewer pilots possibly 
needed for the longer lights with the 
three day layovers. On the other hand, 
it will give pilots an opportunity to be 
back the same day or possibly one day 



later, allowing more Ume at home. 

Midwest just began Its first nego- 
tiation session with its pilots, accord- 
ing to Conrad, who Is optimistic an 
agreement will be reached by die Dec, 
17 deadline. 

Based In Milwaukee, Midwest is 
looking to create a second major 
"hub." Originally, Kansas City, Mo. or 
Omaha, Neb., now smaller Midwest 
hubs, were being considered. 

Further considerations regarding 
the competition of airlines already 
based in (hose locations has resulted 

In Mid- 
west look- 
ing at oth- 
er alterna- 
tives. A 
second 
hub is ex- 
pected to 
be in place 
by 2002, 
according 
to Conrad. 
"That 
will allow 
die company to grow and give its em- 
ployees another option of where they 
would like to live and be based," Con- 
rad points out. 

The industry is changing," Con- 
rad admits. "There arc more and 
more carriers flying into airports and 
cities, some which arc no frills like 
Southwest Airiincs." 

"There are 140-145 new applica- 
tions in die FAA (Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration) for startup service," 
Conrad revealed. "You see a couple or 
three every year. Uke Access Air In 
Des Moines, Iowa which was started 
by a couple of retired pilots and some 
airline employees with a pair of older 
jets." 

"We'll have to match their fares 
initially, but in the long range, they 
don't stay in business long," Conrad 
said. "There's basically 20-30 major 



airlines, with Midwest and America 
West being the only two still around 
that have come about since deregula- 
tion." 

The expansion within die airline 
industry is creaUng a pilot shortage, 
according to Conrad. "We're a little 
smaller which means we don't pay 
quite as much as the majors. The ben- 
efit Is offering just a one-day or 
overnight layover In many cases," 
Conrad said. 

This results In a shortage of tease 
time available for airlines which do 
not own their own flight simulators. 
Midwest's time Is midnight to 4 a.m. 
"This is a shortage for all of the air- 
lines," Conrad said. "Personally, my 
dad liked flying at night, but that isn't 
always the case." 

Regarding Y2K, Conrad sees the 
airiincs in pretty good shape. Midwest 
has been using five teams working to 
make sure it is Y2K compatible. Ac- 
cording to Conrad, the aircraft are at 
100 percent compliance. Ground 
equipment which— Including prop*- 
erty and facilities Midwest owns or 
operates— is listed at 100 percent. 

Reservation system are at 100 
percent compliance. Some software, 
due to reliance on vendors, Is at 99.8 
percent 

"The airport you fly Into is what 
has to be ready," Conrad said. The Air 
Transportation Association, based 
through the Federal Government in 
Washington, D.C, Is coordinating ef- 
forts to ensure the nation's airports 
are in compliance regarding runway 
lights, etc. 

Prcscntfy, those areas are at 90 
percent according to the last report. 

"There should not be a problem 
with any of the airports In the United 
States," Conrad concluded. "If you're 
flying overseas, you may make plans 
to stay a little longer, because I'm not 
sure about how well they're pre- 
pared." 



New Grainger headquarters 
includes ATM, wellness center 



The monthly meeting of the 
Northern Illinois Chapter of the 
International Facility Manage- 
ment Association (IFMA) will be 
held at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 
5, at the corporate headquarters 
for W.W. Grainger, Inc., located at 
1 00 Grainger Parkway in Lake For- 
est. 

Grainger is the leading North 
American provider of maintenance, 



repair, and operating supplies, ser- 
vices and related information to 
business and Institutions. It is the 
only Illinois-based company to ap- 
pear on both the 1998 and 1999 For- 
tune magazine lists of the " 100 Best 
Companies to Work for in America." 
The new Grainger facility Incor- 
porates an open design that provides 

Please see GRAINGER IC7 




New look for Lakeland Homes 



Becoming popular as an option for upscale Lakeland Homes is 
the fourth bedroom that functions more like a second master 
suite. The second/master bedroom is Ideal for families with an 
older live-in relative or an adult-aged child seeking privacy. Mas- 
ter suite sitting room provides a variation on second 'master* con- 



cept. At the opposite spectrum Is the compact townhome with 
'spacious' design offering a compact kitchen with convenient 
combined family room-entertainment center. Townhomes are 
ideal for first-time buyers, single persons or empty nesters who 
seek down-sizing with amenities. 



v. 



! 



October J, 1999 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 07 



- • 



1 



New service may be able 
to help small businesses 



By JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 
Regional Editor 

Many new small and medi- 
um-range businesses have a hard 
time coming up with cash. As a 
result, they often don't have mon- 
ey to pay their bills and can be 
forced to close their doors. 

Key Funding Specialists Inc., a 
privately owned funding business 
in Lake Villa, may be able to help. 

J ill Schwartz, president of Key 
Funding Specialists Inc., said one 
of the services Key Funding pro- 
vides is the purchase of invoices 
or accounts receivables, a service 
commonly known as factoring. 

"A large majority of new com- 
panies fall because of inadequate 
cosh flow." said Schwartz. "The 
banks turn them down because 
they are too young and haven't 
established credit, and without 
outside investors, they are forced 
to close their doors. 

"What many of these compa- 
nies don't realize Is they are sit- 
ting on their biggest asset • their 
accounts receivable," she added. 
"If they are billing reputable ac- 
counts, but can't afford to wait for 
payment, they can sell their re- 
ceivables, at small discount, for 
Immediate cash, allowing their 
company to expand without in- 
curring any debt." 

Key Funding works with in- 
vestors who are ready, willing and 
able to look at any business* ac- 
counts receivable situation. "It's 
a surprisingly simple process, 
and at the end, the business own- 



er has the necessary cash to move 
forward without incurring debt 
and with no Interest to pay." 

Schwartz Is part of a relatively 
new but fast growing industry 
called the Discount Buy. Her 
company finds people who need 
cash and match them with fund- 
ing sources who are interested in 
buying their revenue streams. 

"It's a way for people to come 
up with money for their businesses 
without going to a bank and taking 
out a loan," explains Schwartz. 

Factoring is just one of the 
services Key Funding offers. It 
also provides assistance to busi- 
nesses in helping to secure gov- 
ernment contracts. 

"the federal, state and local 
government agencies spend over 
SI. 2 trillion annually in the pri- 
vate sector," Schwartz said. "That 
comes out to over S3 billion per 
day in lucrative and stable gov- 
ernment contracts that any busi- 
ness can capture.. We work with 
and agency that has finely tuned 
all the aspects of writing a govern- 



ment proposal bidding on It until 
accepted on behalf of our clients, 
and then managing it." 

Another new program Key 
Funding has added to its growing 
line of services include liquida- 
tion, where it works with manu- 
facturers, wholesalers and distrib- 
utors to purchase inventories of 
unwanted products, overstocked 
items, distressed or discontinued 
merchandise. 

Key Funding Specialists Inc. 
provides a full range of services 
for holders of various debt instru- 
ments, including automobile 
notes, marine and aerospace 
notes, mobile home notes, real es- 
tate notes and mortgages. Its ser- 
vices Include finding and negoti- 
ating with funding sources for the 
purchase of notes, appraisals, re- 
ferrals and closings. 

If you have any questions or 
would like more information 
about the services key funding 
provides, contact Schwartz at 740- 
7367 or visit Key Funding's web 
site at www.jill-schwartz.com. 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. They should be on topics of general 

interest, approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, and 

contain a home address and telephone number. The editor reserves 

the right to condense all letters. 

Send letters to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Attn: Letters to the Editor 

30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



Computer Country Expo 

Saturday, October 16th 




Spottsore 

netDIRr 

Save up to 70% on "Everything Computer." 80 Vendors from across the 
Midwest with Computer Clubs, Live Midi Enhanced Entertainment, 
Wild Animals, Workshops, Demos, Hourly Raffle. Come Network! Free 
Magazines! 

9-30 am to 3 pm in the LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS EXHIBIT HALL. Route 120 
(Belvidere Rd.) and Route 45. Grayslake, Illinois. FREE PARKINGI Admission $6. 



Visit www.ccxpo.com 
Or call 847.662.0811 



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Abbott provides disaster relief 
to Taiwan Earthquake Victims 



Abbott Laboratories has sent 
thousands of cases of pharmaceutical, 
hospital and nutrition products val- 
ued at approximately $1 million to 
Taipei, Taiwan, In response to the 
devastation following last week's 
earthquake. Registering a magnitude 
of 7.6, the earthquake has claimed 
thousands of lives and left thousands 
injured. 

"As soon as a disaster strikes, we 
assess the situation to determine what . 
is needed most critically. Abbott is al- 
ways there, ready to provide what we 
need, when we need it," said Robert 
McCauley, founder and chairman, 
AmeriCarcs. "The ongoing support 
we receive from Abbott represents the 
company's continued commitment 
to helping those in need around the 
worid." 

The medical relief supplies, in- 
cluding pediatric and adult nutrition- 
al products, as well as antibiotics and 
intravenous solutions, are being dis- 
tribution by AmeriCarcs, a private, 



1 



not-for-profit disaster relief and hu- 
manitarian aid organization, and by 
local health care authorities, to areas 
hardest hit by the earthquake. 

Abbott employs approximately 
320 people in Taiwan as part of its in- 
ternational and diagnostic operations. 
In addition to efforts taking place on a 
corporate level, local Abbott employ- 
ees in Taiwan have donated nutri- 
tional products to help those dis- 
placed by the earthquake. 

The Clara Abbott Foundation, a 
trust fund set up to help Abbott em- 
ployees and their families, is working 
with local employees who need finan- 
cial assistance as a result of the earth- 
quake. 

Abbott Laboratories is a global, di- 
versified health care company devoted 
to the discovery, development, manu- 
facture and marketing of pharmaceu- 
tical, diagnostic, nutritional and hospi- 
tal products. The company employs 
56,000 people and markets its products 
In more than 130 countries. 



OMC adds veep for casting, machining 



Terry Stinson is the new Division 
Vice President of Manufacturing for 
Machining and Casting at Outboard 
Marine Corp, 

Stinson Is responsible for the 
BumsvOle, Spruce Pine and Andrews, 
North Carolina facilities and has addi- 
tional strategic responsibility for cast- 
ing and machining company wide. 

Before joining OMC, Stinson was 
president of Synerject, a joint venture 
of Siemens and Orbital. He oversaw 
development of direct fuel injection 
systems for a variety of applications, 
and the Implementation of support- 
ing sales and marketing strategies. 

Before that, Stinson was general 



manager and managing director of 
METEOR, which researched direct 
fuel injection applications for two- 
stroke out boards and other two- 
stroke engine applications. 

Prior to joining METEOR Stinson 
held a variety of engineering, research 
and development and manufacturing 
positions at Brunswick's Mercury Ma- 
rine division, including Director of Ad- 
vanced Product and Process Develop- 
ment of Mercury's Applied Technolo- 
gy Group and project engineer on the 
Corvette LT- 5 engine program, which 
was a joint venture between Mercury's 
Mercruiser stem-drive unit and Gen- 
eral Motors Corporation. 




onors 




Center for Enriched Living 
honored outstanding vol- 
unteerism at its annual 
meeting at Maggiano's 
Old Orchard. 

CEL is a non-profit 
agency dedicated to serv- 
ing social, enrichment and 
enhancement needs , of 
persons with develop- 
mental disabilities. 

Among award recipi- 
ents were Kim Novak of 
Deerfield, designated 
Rookie of Year, Daryl Ru- 
bin of Vernon Hills, Scott 
Greenberg of Highland Park, 



(CEL) 




Novak: Made 

Rookie of the 

year 

Maria 



Snyder of Lake Forest Computer Dis- 
count Warehouse ofVer- 
non Hills, Donna. 
Garfield of Buffalo Grove. 
Denise Jaffe of Deerfield 
and Leslie Finkel of 
Highland Park. 

State Rep. Lauren Beth 
Gash (D-Highland Park) 
was thanked for obtain- 
ing a $75,000 state grant 
It was announced that 
the Kresge foundation 
made a S450.Q00 chal- 
lenge grant to CEL's cap- 
ital campaign. 
CEL is located in Deerfield. 



FROM PAGE C6 



GRAINGER: Ammenities 
add up for employees 



all employees with an unobstructed 
view of the outside. There are no in- 
terior columns or offices to block the 
view. The site includes over 650,000 
square-feet of office space for its 
1400 employees. 

Amenities include ATM, a con- 
venience store with dry cleaning and 
laundry drop-off and take-home 



meals as well as sundry goods, an 
employee wellness center, a full-ser- 
vice food court, and a travel agency 
for both business and personal trav- 
el. The building site is designed as 
part of a conservation development 
that will provide approximately 80 
percent of the site being kept open 
and green. 



TAYLOR: Take action to 
make dreams come true 



able and measurable. 

• Break it down into action steps. 
Don't just dream, don't just wish, 
take the first step. Decisions with- 
out actions have no value. 

•Get help. Ask an expert Seek out 
those with experience or skills. 

• Study and learn. If there is no 
expert to ask, become the expert. 
Do your homework, study and do 
the research, People pay for 



knowledge and expertise. 

• Don't wait. Do it now. If I have 

any regrets about living my 

dream, it is only that I didn't start 

sooner. 



Don Taylor is the co-author of Up 
Against the WalMarts. You may 
write to him in care of Minding 
Your Own Business, PO Box 67, 
Amarillo, TX 79105. 






OBITUARIES 



i>ilr>' ' 



C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



October 1, 1999 



A Rineral Home Serving 
All Your Needs 

Over 50 Years Of Caring, Dignified Service 




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Family Owned & Staffed 

♦ Traditional Services 

♦> Pre-Planning ♦♦♦ Cremation Services 

♦ Serving McHenry & Lake Counties 

♦ Out Of State Arrangements ♦> All Faiths 

♦> Available 24-Hours A Day 

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Funeral Home Ltd, 



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12 N. MSTAKKK LAKE 1U> • FOX LAKE 
1 BLOCK WEST OE RT. 12 - 1/2 BLOCK NORTH OF GR/ 



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DEATH NOTICES 



WILL 

Frank R Will, age 73 of Montgomery, Ala, 
Arr: Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslakc 

BIEOERMANN 

John M. Biedcrmann, age 70 of Ubcrtyville 
An: McMurrougli Chapel, Llbertyville 

KANE 

Mildred M. Kane (nee Marcott} age 84 of 

Mundelein 

Am Krlstan Funeral Home PC, Mundelein 



MAIER 

Michael P. Malcr, age 45 of Ubcrtyville 
Arr: Krlstan Funeral Home PC, 
Mundelein 

KJVUDSON 

Robert H. Knudson, age 70 of Mundelein 
Arr. McMurrough Chapel, Ubcrtyville 

KIIARSKI 

Lorraine Kilarski, (nee Wleczorek) age 73 of 

Buffalo Grove 

Am G.L Hills Funeral Home, Dcs Plaines 



nil 1 

1 >i 






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m 

)■ 
I ■ 




Newspapers 



Funeral Directory 



JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

SPRING GROVE FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., P.O. Box 65, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Kurk P. Paleka, Director 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free (888) 394-8744 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM, 1XV. 

410 E. Belvidere Gray slake, IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 



T 



Cordula M. 'Cordy' Waters 

Age 75 of Antioch, passed away, Monday, Sept. 27, 1999 
with her famllyat Victory Memorial Hospital, Waukcgan after 
n lengthy illness. She was born June 11, 1924 In Germany and 
had lived In Antioch since 1952. She worked as a cook at var- 
ious places Including the Boat House, Country House and at 
Wilmot Ski Hills. On Jan. II, 1952, she married Charles 
Waters in Germany and he preceded her In death on Feb. 2, 
1983, 

Survivors include two sons, Charles 'Sonny 1 of Pleasant 
Prairie, Wis. and Jim (Judy) of Antioch; two daughters, Angle 
Waters and Cindy Eberman both of Antioch; one sister, 
Angcllka in Germany; eight grandchildren, Kathy, Chris, Kim, 
Kevin, Jenny, Gina, David and Richard and four great grand- 
children, Brittany, Jacqueline, Rebecca and Allyson. In addi- 
tion to her husband, she is preceded In death by one sister, 
Hanna. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Friends and family visi led at the Strang Funeral Home of 
Antioch. 
. Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 



I, Wis., I 



Ann A. Fox 

Age 87 of Bristol, Wis., formerly of Antioch, passed away 
Sunday, Sept. 26, 1999 at Woodstock Health and Rehab 
Center, Kenosha, Wis. She was bom May 20, 1912 in Chicago, 
the daughter of the late Andrew and Anna (Naurct) Burkhart. 
She was a long time resident of the Antioch area and was a 
member of St. Peter Church. On May 10, 1930 she married 
Leo J. Fox in Chicago. Shcand hcrhusband, owned and oper- 
ated together, Leo J. Fox Trucking In Antioch for many years, 
retiring in 1969. 

Survivors Include her husband, Leo;, one daughter, 
Diana Duchla of Bristol, Wis.; two sisters, Betty Brotchl of Ft. 
Lauderdale, Fla. and Jean (W.R.) Abel of Garland, Tex. and six 
grandchildren, Laurence (Kyta) Buchta, Lance (Marie) 
Buchta, Lcann (B.W) Larson, Lorin (Allan) Jacobscn, Michael 
(Nora) Leber and Audra Leber. She was also the great grand- 
mother of 13 and the great, great grandmother of two. She Is 
preceded in death by one sister, Patricia Leber. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Peter Church. Antioch. 

Friends and family visited at (he Strang Funeral Homcof 
Antioch. 

Interment was at Home Oak Cemetery, Antioch. 

Robert A. Zabroske 

Age 43 of Palatine, passed away Sunday, Sept. 26, 1999 at 
his residence. He was bom Nov. 15, 1955 In Chicago and had' 
made his home in Palatine. 

He leaves his loving wife, Masako (nee Nakano); sister, 
Jean (Robert) Fomi of Spring Grove; brothers, Thomas of 
Arlington Heights and James of Dcs Plaines; nephew, Kurt of 
Arlington Heights; parents, Elmer ( LaVemc) Zabroske of 
Grayslakc; In-laws, Hldenori (Mutsuko) Nakano of Japan and 
sister-in-law, Junko Nakano. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslakc with the Rev. David T. 
Stein and Rev. MasanoriTakcuchi, co-officiating. 

Interment was privately held. 

Memorials may be given to the Konko Kyo Church. 6447 
N. Albany, Chicago, IL, 60615 or to a Charity of choice; In 
memory of Mr. Zabroske. 

William Ector Rocheford 

Age 87, a resident of Florida since 1992, and a former 
longtime resident of Fox Lake after coming from Oak Park in 
1974, died Sunday, Sept. 26, 1999 at the Zephryhavcn 
Nursing Home. He was born on April 13, 1912 in Omaha, 
Neb. and was a veteran of the U.S. Army during WWII. He 
was employed as a painter/decorator for the National 
Decorating Co. in Chicago, retiring in 1974. He was a mem- 
ber of the Painters International Union, Local 275 of Chicago, 
the Lake Region American legion Post 703 of Fox Lake, a 
member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church In Zephryhills, Fla, 
and a former member of St. Bcde Catholic Church In 
Inglcsldc. 

Survivors Include, his sisters, Lorraine DeCabooter of 
Omaha, Neb., Rita (Jack) Ford of Las Vegas, Nev; several 
nieces and several nephews also survive. He Is preceded In 
death by his wife, Nellie (nee Parker) Rocheford who passed 
away Feb. 22, 1990 and by one brother, Harold Rocheford. 

Friends of the family visited at the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake) 

A Catholic Funeral Mass was celebrated at St. Bede 
Catholic Church in Inglcsldc. 

Burial followed at the Church Cemetery. 

Karen L. Streit (nee Gawd) 

Age 47 of Round Lake passed away Thursday, Sept. 23, 
1999 at her residence. She was bom June 26, 1952 In Chicago 
and had been raised In Dcs Plaines. A resident of Round Lake 
since June of 1997 formerly of Palatine for over 15 years. A 
registered nurse working at St. Francis Hospital In Evanston 
with Home Health Care. 

She leaves her loving husband, Robert G. Streit whom 
she wed on Sept. 26, 1981 In Arlington Heights; children, 
Brian T, of Chicago, Tcrl L of Berwyn, Kevin A. of Anderson, 
lnd., Greg A. of Arlington Heights, and Robin R. Streit of 
Round Lake; parents, Alfred (Dolores) Gawel of Tucson, Ariz, 
and mother- In-law, Betty Streit of Arlington Heights; sisters, 
Kris (Gene) Snoko of Memphis, Tenn., Ralph Gawel of 
Plain field, and Gayte Carlson of Chester, Penn. She Is preced- 
ed In death by her father-in-law, Walter A. Streit. 

A Funeral Mass was celebrated at the St. Joseph Catholic 
Church, Round Lake. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake, 



Interment followed at Fairvicw Memorial Park Cemetery 
In Northlakc. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the 
American Cancer Society, 777 Central Ave., Highland Park, IL 
60035. 

Stephen Dorn 

Age 38 of Gages Lake, passed away Sept. 20, 1999 at St 
Theresc Medical Center, Waukcgan. He was a member of the 
Gages Lake Home Improvement Association. 

He is survived by his wife, Sherry ColHna, who m he wed 
on Oct. 21, 1994; daughters, Allschia, Brianna and Jourdan; 
parents, Stephen and Bernicc Dorn; sisters, Angela and 
Tracey Dom; brother, Michael Dorn, grandmother, Mattie 
Dorn. He is preceded In death by his grandfather, Stephen 
Dorn. 

A Funeral Mass was held at St. Gilbert Church, 
Grayslakc. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslakc. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park Cemetery, 
Libcrtyvillc. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the Dom 
Children Fund, c/o Anchor Bank, Highway 45 at Washington. 
Grayslakc, I L 60030 

Marvin M. Carr 

Age 65 ofGraysIakc, passed away Friday, Sept. 24, 1999 at 
his home in Grayslakc Marvin was bom In Sycamore and 
has resided In the Lake County area for over 50 years. He 
proudly served his country In the U.S. Army during the 
Korean Conflict. He was an employee of OMC In Waukcgan 
for 35 years. 

He Is survived by his wife, Lorctta (ncc Rothmund); his 
daughter, Dawn Powless; his son, William (Sherry) Powlcss 
and his other daughter, Toni (Scott) Ludwtck; his grandchil- 
dren, Barbara (Donald). Josephine, Theodore, Marvin and 
Shyannc; many loving brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews and 
friends, Marvin is preceded in death by his parents, David 
and Dorothy; his brother. 'Joe'; his sister 'Mickey; and his 
daughter, Margaret Ann. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslakc. 

Interment followed at the Avon Centre Cemetery, 
Grayslake. 

William II. Beadle 

Age 56 of Round Lake Beach, died Monday, ScpL 27, 
1999 at Condcl) Medical Center In Ubcrtyville. He was bom 
Feb. 22, 1943 In Chicago to Charics F. and Glcnna (Jennings) 
Beadle. He was a resident of the Round Lake area since 1956. 
He married Glen Is Nannemann on Oct. 28, 1967 In 
Waukcgan. William was a salesman for B and G Movers of 
Round Lake Beach, retiring in 1998. He served In the U.S. Air 
Force during Vietnam as a weapons mechanic He was a 
member of Am vet Post 10 of Round Lake Park. William wasa 
former Village Trustee of Round Lake Beach. He served the 
Avon Township Baseball Association for over 40 years partic- 
ipating In every aspect including, being a player, a coach, a 
team manager, an officer, and a commissioner. William was 
an avid golfer of Ren wood Country Club. 

Survivors include his wife, Glenis Beadle of Round Lake 
Beach; his three children, Diane (Tim) Hlggins, William (Sue) 
Beadle of Round Lake Beach, Robert Beadle of Round Lake 
Beach; his two grand daughters, Lauren and Jaclyn Hlggins; 
his brother, Terry (Deborah) Beadle of Lake Villa; and his five 
nieces and nephews. He is preceded In death by his father, 
Charles 'Bud' Beadle In 1999; his mother, Glcnna Beadle In 
1990; and his brother, George Beadle in 1994. 

Visitation will be from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30 at 
the lusten's Round Lake Funeral Home, 222 N. Rosedale 
Court, (Rosedale Court at Cedar Lake Road), Round Lake. 

A Funeral will be held Friday, Oct 1 morning at the 
Funeral Home with Rev. Lisle Kauffman, officiating. 

Interment will follow in Wlndridgc Memorial Park, Cary. 

Memorials may be made in WUliartfs name to Friends of 
Ren wood, c/o Ren wood Country Club, 1413 N. Hainesville 
Road, Round Lake Beach, IL 60073. 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
& Crematorium, Ltd 




FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 
ESTABLISHED 1898 

410 East Belvidere Road 
(hwslake, E 60030 

(847) 223-8122 

David G.Strang •Richard A. Gaddis 
Directors 



- i 



October 1, 1999 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers / C9 









• 



Females 
Seeking Males 



1 -900-896-5999 



ALL WE NEED 
Itocwvl, *nwigde$¥7f,37, £6", jldbi , w* dart blrta* h*r, 
who da* boilrvj, tding *M soysdvxi Una w»9i tan*, « 
bctong br a Hcwi, honed SWM, 35-d for ■ poatbb bng- 
tormrdilonihc MI9773 

A MAGNETIC ATTRACTION 
Friend inrj 1 brer-ed 00 be Bind o( bit warm, carta DWPF. 
S7. p«««, iim«, •«< brow hair md Mm itm, who «y>yi 
a*, mutoc, Metal end totted eonwHtm Her choc* Mi 
b* t good ruTW«J. cacwdtbta SWU, S049, wtti itrnev 
rtarttU Ml. 1945 

. ANEWWORLD 
The r*yiie*ly * 5WPF, 42. 5 6*. 16Sto* . wrth brown he* and 
•vn. I* ISO * weMduciled. atojctoneb SWM, 42 55 who 
they** hM r.tar «!i n NU ctatictl miK, movwi, Unr-j 
out, wiljng ind mx* CouWyoutehmi Adl VHI 

OUTGOING 
Laugh snd enby Mo w* Hi green-eyed MunoM SWF. 34. 
MS. norvdrnar. Her ni* t*!i inttooe coobng. movta*. 
mute. hoaebeck rekng and dntog out and the teeU in 
a****out. ton-tovng SWM. 35-10. wan whom to intra 
MM |ta Md mora. Ml 6809 

LOOKING FOR LOVE 
DWF. il 5TS". 1 6Sbi. iBractve and Orvcdy '•«■ a latch* 
w*i on* cruM and dtoMM Into tab. It MMta 1 SWM. 4055 
tor ton. p*iton. compancriyvp. handtf>p. and a bng-tarm 
rtltttmihp Ml 12M 

GOAL ORIENTED 
fir. humoroue SWF. 25 SB*, t30bi. wth brown htf and 
green fy at. enpyi mode*, ctomg out iwtomww. and ptrrma 
vc4*yb*l S/w*M«»r^*lunSWU.?s-W.w**rnbir« tar- 
ed* Ml 7326 

SOMEONE LIKE VOU 
A-i*c*v*. turnout 5WPF, 47. c**t*. ■ bWeyed ttond* 
who tore* be ouktoon and diwj, It tSO an iftactve, 
humoroua, *ctv«. SWPU, 3943. wth itong veto**. I Mf 1 
you.cilhar.Ada.7074 

FORE! 
The, tfractva. anoagra DWPF. 45. petto, • en *ta coter. 




Puffing the Pieces" Toother wHh 



Personals 







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brought tb you by... Lakeland Newspaper 



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NEW HORIZONS 
Eety to oat ebng dtt, td humoroua SWPU. ». 6*, IBM*, 
wdi brown htr and MM am, teaks a eompeitota SPF. 2 1- 
35, tor co rr p ar wj whip. Ha bee dandna. aring out mowat. 
and waraj la maalTou-Adl jfll7 

LOOKING FORYOU 

SWM. 2 1. SM )• i«5fja . *» tnwn haa/am. outoota wtt 

a good tanaa of ftomor, It amptorad and mm dancm work- 



kig on can and apanrjtas Irm w* h» Handt. Ha Ml 

tor ■ ■*** pn*y SWFTA3I JS97 

HELLO SUNSHINE 
S»r$8U. f». yr.w^b w w n aita,whowyyitport>tnd 
ifB»t.iiaaaiung an o p aimii l ao SWF, PapandqaMiyirna 
wax Adl .4077 

FEEL AT EASE 
Humoroua. kind and carta, til SWPM. *i. S\\\ iSSbt , 
wan rattkth brown Mir andWua ayat, who antoyi bfcta. hk- 
ng. and wttNnfl movwi. » ISO an rxmaiit. irctra. toman- 
fc, ccarwi M M t patta SWF, undar if, tor a rnvnoamoua 
raMwahto.Mt.7212 

SET UP A DAVTO MEET 
Funny SWM ,Jt9, ITOba. w* ibktahak and yaanaywt, 
twl annri paryra ouatr and tpanJoQ kma ww» twnds. 
taaka an otAjong. dariamaac SWF. 18-22. tor Manual*. 

FOCUS HERE 

unployad. nunwoos SHU, 34, ST, I22t», 



Look for Personals every Friday in the Lakeland Newspaper. 



BE HONEST WITH ME 
Pattionakt. parwnabla SBF. 34, ST. itSt*. 



we dark 



tea m ISO i luxwuU »cK*. firvkTvmg SWU. 40^ wfo 
Hun (ptta tavat ciAa-al acMaa. wtky i 



1 iporti and bfcy« 



PRESCRIPTION FOR ROMANCE 

Spand a Ha Imt wah har, tat wamv kwndV SWF. 7S. S"S*. 

lMt». wan btonda Ma and MM ayaa. BJm Km pMn 

k> maat a tirniar SY.uT tt-eS 



ool. Itnrat, and nopaa 
Mt32S5 

RAOtANTOLOW 
Friandt tay that a twaat kta and honatt SWF, 45, 57, 
ttfet, «* auburn hair and haial aval, uwfi a rati MM b 
aMM |m MX Sha kU» rruuc MMta] raadng. and laaki 
a eonxjtc-ia SWM 44-5S. tor a po%tfH latatonthcj 

CONTACT ME 
Corrpauonala SWF. 44, 5 i". 1 CM» . «e rtd htf and ^i< 
f»e». »<» MM MMta nx»< and tang •***. • MmMM « 
macang a SWU, 4S-CO. tor mryjannnthp. Ma 7449 

ACCOMPLISHED 
Fufrtowno SWF, 2 1 , 5T, w* dark btonda htf and Mm tyat. 
who anpyi iporti. vanota ima win vwndt and mora. • 
knkng tor a cvrq SBU, 20-30, b go oU and hart a good 
kmaw*iMM169 

COULD LEAD INTO MORE 
But wu wonl in>m urdau you cal tm uatan% humoraui 
SWF. CtL ST, 1 JQt* , wan i arjdart-btonda hat and MM ayat. 
MS, who anpyi fjnng txi, itraL moviat, md romantc 
avaaJaat. mm a aMM SWM. 60499. AM 71 St 

SHOW ME AROUND 
5*y-ai for SWPF. 24. ST, w* dvk brown hai/aya*. an 
arnbbyad tbdant who arm raarkng and pkryrg apork, ■ 
ISO i SU. 20 29. who Mm rtvatrw. to go out w*, trd dt»a»- 
cp a iKsndvhrj and mora Ml 85SJ 

COMFORTINO 
Ths humorous SWT. 39. 5T. >72t» . w* brown oyaL who 
rfoyi Hang, iwrrmng and tmang. a taaiung a SWU. 
who ihttM unUr rtltraati MIJ044 

NOT TOO LATE 
Aaacvva SWF. 30, ST. teSbt. wan bktaa har and btoa 
rye*, irfw anpri OVvrj out dancm) and t**«Ji. woukj Ma 
b meat a Ko-taywj. romank: S'rVU. 15-33. wrs hu t good 
fcwua ol humor Ml S424 

GENTLE LADY 
Fut-lgurad SWF. 54, ST. w* ul and papoar har and brown 
r, «v who erpri (Wig. (Uncna thOM. tan, and B*i mar- 
kati. laati an oogora. camg SWU, to thira tagatwmau. 
MI3917 

CAFUNO AND HONEST 
Eairgong SWF, 40. 5 . 105*5* . MS. mm tin-n haiVya*. 
»*o mpyt mml MM r«*ng, cMkia and muwc k] ISO ■ 
SWU, SsHtt. arpkja. to Mtntinc) am ** 3m 

CLASSY LAOY " 
Vary tttactra, tMidar and paMa SWJPF. 45. 67. 12545a. 
wan btondt hM and brown ayaa. m taarchrg fc* an aducit- 
ad. MMM 5WU, tOSO. NjS, who anpri MM*, campaig. 
iwj twata and toi Ma 9003 

LIFE, LOVE A LAUGHTER 
Thw horwu. praty SWF. 22. 57. 140bL, a bka>ayad 
bnnatia. * an auvgomg romanbe wre OHM WoUk nwMi 
rirang out and tang wait. >Va you Ma Twidaorno. tmcara 
SWIL 2029. who can mala har taughT Ml ttOC 

NO FUN ALONE 
A goal cornrruiralor. twi Om, MMM SWPF. (0. ST. who 
truMt Ma. tnanda. oAnl airanti. hatory, rrtwa*. raadrig. » 
BO a SWU, tor tandywA poaably mora, fc* 2714 

WORTH ATRY 
Thai twaat wart SWF. J9, 5 :5\ I TSto*. wth rad hat and 
bkiwaaan tya*. a tWant who anpy* muvc *m ouktocn. 
and aivmata, ■ boang tor an advanajrout, intafcganl 
SWHtWI. undar 47, wth aMM WaraaS Kit 6666 

COMFORTING 
Shy al InL tit i-*ar SHF. 35. 54'. 160bt, wan brown 
MWMt, who tnpri aahm cootong and movwa. • Marad- 
M n SmMM a rwa SHU, 2*40. to tpand ojuaMy Ima aa\ 
MI2S4I 

NO FREE RIDES 
SW mom, 42. 57. HOba. who anpyt kthrna MJdta and 
monaa. n lawtong a Mvtovmg. aasjowig SWU. 4047, ario 
Mt* good uraa of nunc* Ail 363" 

START OF SLOW 
Furvtovrtg. carng SAF. 21. ST. wth brown hat and rjaan 
aval, who anpyi patand and drawng. Sha'i bokngtor a 
Sxt ireara. MnaS SM\M 7829 

ALWAYS CHEERFUL 
Sha'i an aarygoing, arrptoyad WWAF. 46. 57, maoVn 
buaU wr»i btonda hat and graan ayaa. WS. who anpyi «M> 
tog. mow*, bcyckng. dtwig ed and cuddkng Cal today i 
you'ta a lovra. urnm«TwnHTWdad SWU. 40-55. 8 *. 
Ml £705 

WORK OF ART 
Humoroua SWF. « I. ST. w* brown haa and hual ayaa. who 
aMM laadtog. MMMRfl bma wan Hanoi and mora. It MtV 
togi JM49MV Maii SWU, 54-68. MS. to go out md 
rm a good kma wav Ml 2520 

AS CLOSE AS YOUR PHONE 
Cal to know to* SW mam. 25, ST. t lhapah/. bba-ayad 
btonda who anjow mutt raadaigjnd waaa en m baacn. 
taaka a utn SU. 21-39. rkxmod n aharing a mukaky. 
rawankng iMkomho Ml 5762 

THE PRIME OF LIFE 
rjakghflul unpratantoui OWPf. S&. ST. ISObi, wM itd- 
daMtown h»r. who anjoyi bowkng, pkryvg cardt. mute. 
Oancm mortaa. Haaiar and awjMM to do wan tot <wjM.to 
laaktoe an aaaygong. humoroua SWU, SO-63, MS. Mi 1 M 7 

QUIET NATURE 
OMortg. panda SWF. 44, SV, who anpyi P*«*waphy. 
cooking andmmwi. a ISO t arxara, MWn SWU. undar 
58. ** arniar rtaratli. tor a rnortogamout ratakonarrp 
MI1545 

CAN YOU RELATE? 
Shalt handry SW mom. 28. ST. rrwatom bur^wjh dark 
btonda haa and btoa awa. Farri#7-caruarad.ir>a«ISOii«n; 
iar-mrtoad. MS, SWU 2S-3S. «ti I tan*a c4 aovarturt and 
ton Ml 7417 

BEST FOOT FORWARD 
Anictva. cVnamc and aducalad SWF, 60. ** brcmn 
hai/fiat. who toraa ctanctog. tou rruue. and nalura a %*m\- 
r^acoTp*r^^hia.ire«tSU.SS64.k)rkwfdihvlaad- 

ing to mora Ml 4998 

MAKE THAT CALL 
JltU what youVa baan toctong tor t twaat ttoeara. Kavbvwig 

SWF. IS. who anpyi muic rronaa and bamg ouktoori. 
Sha i totng tor a chtrmng. tal handwrna SWU. 18-23, to 
lhara kwtoinip and good Ima*. MI.72S4 

CLASS ACT 
Low* M ard c/»acu» DWPF. 44. wM anpyi a* e^ 



MtayMi ta tooktog tar ■ than, carta SWU. 40-ia who acta 
kUanadULSha braa ta ouktoon, yard work, parki and 

rrmtatMt.J!B9 

MUST LOVE CHILDREN 
Vary praty. havbrlng SB mom, 29, ST. wBi Mown hair and 
#7*i. a irjakta a icortmacui. honasl SU. 3042. tor a LTFL 
Sna anpyi ODOUng. ttval. ipwtl. tpandta Ima w*> h« t«- 
4 an and mora Ml 9118 

SUMMER NIGHTS 
SWF, St, ST. i15U„ wan btonda hair and Mm ryta, arpyi 
bng waks. Cknta out . danmg, iwannta and much mora, i 
bo*j^k>apt4art.j«neaandanng S'rVU. undar 55, BlfArt 
Ml wJtv Adl 2309 

GOD BLESS YOU 
Carta, lun. praty SWF. 59. w» brmm har and btoa ayaa, 
anpyi dtota out concerto, and tttwkng. « BO t SWU, S5-70, 
wan wmetr ntarattt Jd$ 2975 

DONT HESITATE 
Aftactra DW mom. 45, w* btonda har and graan ayaa. wants 
to Ind a Ind SWU. over 65, ready to ahar a ovrpanranahp and 
mutM Mma* Aai 994 S 

NOTHING SWEETER 
F^tYgotog SWF, 45, 57, »* btonda he* and grain ayat, who 
anpyi working out dancrg. mute bajng. tong wak*. and 
t-rmnj. m hopng to men a Uvtovrq. ml S'rtU. 4055 to 
icwndtrwwai MI2I33 

TAKE A LOOK 
SWF, 42. 57. w* Mown nak/eyet, who anjpyi noma Irnprova- 
ment Mt ouktoon, gtrdanm. tatong mm, rruc and bicy* 
dng. latkt a kudworfry SWU. 38-45 M* 3*25 



SICK OF BEING SINGLE 
Btoe-tyad btondt DWF. 50, 54*. 110M, a taakjng a humor- 
out, htndtoma SWU, 4555, to there kavat cooking, gardwv 
ngartJtaugWar. M* 5701 

HAVE A HEART 
Fun. iweet SWF, 23, ST. a graan-aytd btonda, who anpyi 
moviai. iKwvj aA and n* outooon. yukt t wn*Av«, tpod- 
nakiad SWU. 25-39, who bra* toe. Mf 7»5 

OLD-FASKONED 
Oown-b-etrti SW mom, a. tof-igured, weft bng brown 
hairVyet, I inxkar.who anpyi bngdnvwtnra cour*y. cock- 
ng. cufcara and "wing hand r> Und. iwaki a torrff-tfwnwd 
SWU, 4049, tor MaRbhb kit Ml J744 

DINNER m A MOVIE? 
Staara. bvrg DW mom 52, ST. ITS**. w«i auburn hair, 
who anpyi bowkng. campng. bng etfct and N ouktocn. la 
Making i handtorn* SWU, 4565 wtt iMtar totoratta. tor a 
LTFt Ml 3023 

THE PRIME OF LIFE 
Eaiygota SWF, 65, who enpyi danorg. ckta out t tvat 
iporta and moit. would tk* b meet a corfptSwi SWU, 6575 
Ml 6538 

GENTLE ON MY MIND 
Tm a wimheartod. MMCtrt SAF. 40. ST 120**, MS. who 
it boking tor a carta. aJecbntM SWU, 3950, tor a rnaanta- 
tonatasomhp M* S448 

SEIZE THE DAYI 
A Ughty Ihy SWF, 1^ ST. llOta, w*7i Mown hair and (yean 
ayaa, MM pitying pod and beach wafes. She want* b mad a 
run-bvng, arnpbyed SU. 1S-2S. tor quaiiy Imet togetwr. 
Ad* 4512 



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ON THE SAME WAVE LENGTH 
Thta tdlernpbyed SWPM. 40 8T, tfSto*. wM kgnt Mown tat 
and btoa aye*, la teetong a SF. undar 45. to arm eeardae, 
canoetog. boring, ihort pet Mm and mora wati hin Dom 
ddejr. cal tka grad guy today. Adt 6635 

YOU, TOO? 
Thara'i an emph; epect to hia kkj wnara tova end nmanct 
Ihoukl be. Camg. amptoyid SWU, 50, Sir, 22Stoi. w*h MM 
brown hat and graan eye*. MS. wanta to mad ttal epeod SF. 
53 or under Adi 4 556 

WELL-EDUCATED 
Hatred SWU. 80. 510*. ITStoa. wan btandniMe KM. kww 
go* . MMn nt dVw>a end auea*. Ha'i ISO * dander. MMM 
ad SWF. 6075 b anp* and epol Mi 7821 

TO HAVE FAITH 
Thw humoroua and advenuout SWU. 27. 511". 2IOtoa. weh 
brown ha* and ham ayaa. it teetong a SCF. 23-35 to anpy 
■porta, readtog tw Bbto, aaandta church end mora wdi nt% 
Coutohabada*at)ngyouTMiBi78 

LOVE IS COLOR BUND 
Frtondy SOU, 40, 6T. 220tja. teak* a epacid SOWF. 4056, 
w*o anpyi dnrvj out q-jwT avanngi trig **Xi mil mute, 
and honebeck rdng. Ad*58i« 

ITS IN THE STARS 
Check oultah*nd»omaSVW*.3 5^wdum tu *l,w«h twwn 
hadeyei, who la tond ol oukluu r actartjaa and nopryj b end 
ttal epaad get a aweeL incare, eyedeetra SWF. 34-35. 
MMMM to a LTFt M4287S 

JUST FOR YOU 
Ha'i a henoaome. btot-ayed. Mond SW dad. 32. ton-tomg and 
outgotig. who warn to there ha Mtreatt to rnovto*. bowkng. 
andouktoor acMket wrto a incar*. bngnt and MmMhI SWF. 
26-3*. who it tond ol cMdran, Ml 670* 

IT ALL ADDS UP 
Cheek out td adve. oteot^graed SWM, a^ST, 16Sba, 
wM nd Mown hat and ateaic butd. Ha t hoptog to tpand 
9*Hytme wdii godawtod S8F. 21-35 djieanirierehe 
maraata to iporta, motarcydaa. movtoa. rltohug end Qting 



ouLMl' 



UULTVFACETEO 



H'^Wi 



&npi\7)torfDWiiJ^ CanaVJ Qir^^ 

Wkmtn »a fca wdeTwal to Uwir »drt nawVaa ar by aaUL Yaw wwy aba edit It arwdW « twrt^art •*» 



rXnd Raw^arwr jVlaiirttof (US.L l«^ 3451 Wrtwfa LwHt.WIBtoowtUw, Srm Yari 1*111, awrtaaukrf aw toirr ibaw 
Ocldwrll.im l«lud*thri»mrrfUw»*p»r-h,rtr«M*aurfduwwirwF--» t ^ ,i 



MAKE ME LAUGH 

Fun-fcwta end oulgorg, td SAF, 18 ST. IJOtn , «M) brown 
r»i-rra«.wtiiLtiaMwrotoaago«igodwakwr*.rrwnaa. 
end ejejcUeg. Sha'i aedung a w*Jy SU wth limwv MMMM 
Ml 5863 

HOLD ON TO YOUR HEART 
Cartog. humoroua SWF. 6X ST. 135*)*, w* gray dark 
haa/ayaa. who anpyi wAreetrno, bng waka. bowing, bat- 
rocm danemg. and rmwkng. leeka an attypong. humoroua 
SWU. 60-70, who htl ifenfcM totoratta. Mli664 



anamkon, beyckna and aurctoa. w itwkta an ambeou* 
twGDMiki SWM. 3756, who «baa rtagnfy Xa* 



14237 



MY TURN 
Thta aTtabla SWP motar ol tow. 36. 54*. 125c*, a trnoket, 
a hopta to then ton. twibhb and common mtaraali am t 
■BMW SWU, 2846 Ml 2797 

CHOOSE ME 
Stocart dd IMagent tat tal SWF. 26. ^•"ortbtortoatair 
and btoa ayaa. who Ik** bJung. IMHM, baWdi. and mad- 
iVnWptcdw. • I4wkta a EWU, -?». who • ctowrHo- 

aamMISiie '■* 

THE GENUINE ARTICLE 
Mvanbrou*. atotckva SWF, 29, 54*. 105 bi. wth wVtong 
bX^Edd Mw« eve*, who Mum ir^bo*^b*jn* 
i/lMtorw*. rrwaa inJ mora, a boking be I ha/Cionw. W> 
S?rtlattoSU 27-39. who enjoyi kla to toe MMU 

SWEET* PETITE 
Emptoyed OW mot*. 2ft 4*11*. • I4«tong ■ lirrwWtoniad 
SWTU72O00. who anpyi moviat. penct, latong wata and 

mtaSK Satn WA.T ANY LONOER^ 

Sha'i an aatygata gal who anpyi waf^aadtog. danerg 

neUtyet, iwVi • war*. honeU SWU. 28-3a who Uei ar*- 
mata.MtB39C 



JUSTSAYIT . 
Aa-ecove, SWF. X. 130b*, btonda hat. graan ayaa. amoker. 
Mm beta, cemprng, hhta and rdtar btodtog, hope* to trd a 
SWU, 25M wth ajmtaj htoreta. Adl 6463 

LOOKYHERE 
Tma ka^iy. emptoyed SWF, 20, ST. I40U, who anpyi aoc*> 
^ M iitaanda»v}odbctobLlwouMbv*toodhtouoHi*t)t 
*P SBU. 19-&MI9707 

A MATCH MADE IN HEAVEN 
Bubbly, kaHMng. cohga-gong SWF. 19, 5S*. 120b*., wan 
cuny Mown hat and btoa tyet. a itodant who enpyi tporb, 
»awv3movi*i,ardgor^outtaboij^bra*i«»vaSWU. 
19-23, who baa to go out end hmre a good tm*. Mi 5681 

INSPIRED? 
The twaat emptoyed SWF. 24. S. 130b*, tab rad heir and 
trown aye*, deabtod. anpyi nana*, ihopota. cenctog and 
nxaau-^ebotong tor a earing, honed SWU, 24-25 to ipend 
chAJ lm* wth. Ad* 3372 

GET AWAY FROM IT ALL 
County muaic. anrmdt and lea -rnarketa era tod a tow Htf 
adt td humor out SWF. 55 4" 1 1". patto. wM brown haa'tye*. 
Sha'i ISO * iponstnaofl SWU. S0«3.Ad*579S 

GETIN TOUCH 
Sh* , *lSwW.25.wt»bro^hM'*yaa.wholAaato«wvd*nc- 
rab*r^w*twrxa.*nd^»«^nov»i.»ndk»aUl?rtU. 
2fj2. to go out and do tkngi wth. M» 5953 

OUALTTYTIME 
Btonda and oeafreyed, tra UVtguad SWF, 31. ST. who 
mm movwa. kkhtia. and gomg tor cm drwe*. it bctong tor a 
mart, honed SU, 2640 Ml S6S2 

MAKE A LOVE CONNECTION 
Bcneined. atactonato SWF. 41. 2354a. wd> Mown 
haVtyet, a *mc*ar. anpyi htafti dub*, iporta, nwa*,danc- 
ra a.'rJ mxi\ more She wanta b Mad a rekubruhrp wM an 
hrjnett dDwrvtoraartv open-rnrtoad ZfM Mil 782 

DYNAMIC 
Itobed SWF. 31, 54*. a U-tfe*ed. btoe-eyed bruneM. who 
wtp,i her work, conctrta. mute movwa and dtora out It 
leatong a reiponitoto, ton-tonng SWU. 2745 k» 8360 

SENSUOUS SOUL MATE 
Thta ptoykA pridy. provocah*. honed, upbeat ccntberato. 
tlacttonde. led^needad SWPF. 52, teeii an ectve, torHowa 
ganerous. rantntrc, weKgroomad. degreed DWFU. MS. 46- 
56. tor batter, rrmrta*, ctota, taugNd, bnta. and bving 
Mi 8932 

SOMEONE JUST LIKE YOU 
Atoaetve. yourrg-bokta. r»leg*-oegieid SWF, 42. Sir. -o 
btonda haa and btoa eyet. anpyi woriM out aporta .movwa 
and kavekng. teak* a trddtou, lecwa kt MS SWPU, 38-48, 
ovm 6. wth limrtar ntoraata. tor a LTFt toadrg to marnege. 
Ml 4037 

LOOKING FOR ROMANCE 
Avery actve and an«B*e od. M SWF, 15 5T. ItSbi.wih 
bbno* hat and Mown eyea. »^^J^ «»f* '2-^ ff* 1 ; 
togardrrwt ByWraaiomer^SWUT^I^landlMwhd 
you tee. leave Mf a rraaiaga today. M»5t36 
PERFECT CHEMISTRY 
I you Ike rearing, nwie. rronet end iporta J*wh«t«totto 
ornrnon wth hM. td atentve, torHomg md urcera DWPF, 
«. ST. wth brown haaVtre*. She* hopino yoi/ret etaiiy 
SWU. 44-55, who know* how to ted t tody. Ml. 1 208 

ARE YOU LISTENING? 
SW mom, 29. 57. medtom two. a gorgaout green-eyed 
btonda. wanta b art i man wan whom the can ihMt a won- 
derlul ttordahb wtA An kntaAgent conddarata, tandaoma 
SWU. 3038, ihoukl cal imneckito*/ Mt 8976 

HAPPY ENDINGS 
Jud you type, mad td upbad. r^inwwrwdedSWF^. SS\ 
»mai eu> tceou*. w*J> dtrL drarnakc, pood tooki. who wanta 
toW mKmm* guy. i taL hudy^WU. 3550, act.dy 
rKONad b ipota, ptaywg pool tohng and cw ouOoori 
MI.18IS 



READY FOR A DATE 
The bvrig. arTpbyed SWF. 28. 55*. wan bbnde hair and btoa 
eye*, hat a fajm met .atoM J lafle. She anpyi muit eata. 
rjanpng. nvnee, irrnkta, and teeka a lavtonng SWPU. 28- 
36M0655 

ENJOY LIFE 
Penontbto SWF, 64 55*. HStoe, It leerchta tor a ItHdrta 
iwndy SWU, MS, who enpyi got. drung out, movwa and 
mora.Ml.678l 

SHARE LIFE 
SWF, 4a who anpyi naU*. pnebgnpny. old movtot, yoga, 
arttouet end mora, to leekrg an open, tartfy SWM, aetoout 
ehMen. M* 5609 

HEAVENSENT 
SW mom, 24, ST, T3S**, wan btonda hat and btoa ajaa. 



Ptoy no gamea wd> td eeerotog. M arg Mb r w atd SWPM. 31. 
Sr. wth btond haa. Ha enpyi edctoor ectie.it. word*, 
rnuec tad more, and la BO a SWF. uwtor at. Ml 6*66 

. CHASJNO SUNSETS 
Thw romtnes SWPM, 50, who anpyi terd. bra wdto) end 
good ccmaraatan, to to eterch of e MMgund SF. to apwd 
rsabto tone wax k»TTU 

SPEOAL OCUVEFTY 
Sodatang to big wM bar eatygedg. hMdwortong SWM. 45. 
ST. ITatau w M tooww MtAye e, and reatoo ft e hto atoo 

FHieNCfSHIP FIRST 
Frwnty SWM. *l 510*. ITSbt, wee rw-i hdr and bfae 
eyea. who anpy* wortong out e wto w w i o end apenota tma 
aim toanda. it aaatM a ft. dtacawe SV*. 3*4 Tjor a peweV 
bto long-tamrMtond\p Adl 441! 

CHARISMATIC 
Euygomg. re* ad SWU, 78. SIO*. 180b*. wdt gray her and 
b«o»n ayat. «*o anpyi itvwirg. oaneng and *oaalon£ ■ 
bottog far an atacaonat* SWF. 7MS. M42544 

YOU WONT BE SORRY 
Check out let wry rjukjoba. vary antrut-uac SWM. 24, 6", 
rnedtom MML gotoan brown Mir, btoa eye*, who • boktogbr 
tod aMCtoJ otoaTa aewHeewtod SWF. T530 who wanub 
there MecttoM and romance. Ml 37 23 

YOU CANT DO BETTER 
Panonatto DWPU. 47. 6T, 200ba, wall Mown hat and grean 
•yw*. "no anpyi Orwvj out mcvw*. trd rtamalord rival a, 
rwarattad to rtadng i ^akaWdtd SWF. 35-45. Adt 2012 

SO MUCH FUN TO BE HAD 
Rivtovng and ouigota, tat SWPU. 56. ST. 1 TStot . Mb 
taown haw and btoa eye*, whota btoret* tatoda r^roenta. 
bowing and aramafe. • hoping to mad an adactve. honed. 
romanec SWF. war C. *e irrwar r-Wratta Ad* 5S33 
PICK UP YOUR PHONE 



hatayt*. wtuar.prtriyddrwvjoiAandmc/tBbotnj 
to an abactor*. pebtSWF. 1539. wth bto* aye*. Adt 4644 

HEAR ME OUT 
SW dad done, 56. ST. 170b*. »» brown her, btoa tyaa 
tnrj t beard, anpyi got. bowtng. boenktard f 
gcurrrd axinQ. and ronwnce Ha't toclung tor I to, 
be SWF, undar 35 Adt .6602 

HEARTOFGOLO 
HMdtome SWPU, 44, 6* **. wth Mown heVivM win anpyi 

BE PREPARED 
txil have bu d nwreia to lhara wth **» penonatto, 
gcodtooiuna SMI. M. SIO*. MAM. Mack haa. Mown 
aya*. who'i noprvi to gM bgdnar wth a hdy r 
SWF. 3549, ready to iher* advemura and 
AMA428 

GREAT DISPOSmON 
Thw tar>b*ck SWU. 44. Slff. t35b*. w«i brown hat «nd 
t*J* ay**, tnpyi tm acrt, amutamrrt part*, got. bowing. 
tnryitju. tie ouktoor*. end ten bdung br a 
SWF, 3*46, tor a potabto LTR AM5W7 

FUN-LOVING 
Atotctvw SWM, 2ft. 67. 220ba, wth ihort md htr and 
Mown eye*. Me* worktog out mour.an Mbng, aklngand 
ware rjnrwvj Ha'i faokbg tor a cornpatbto, podkve SWF. 
who mow* wrwtuw wanta Adl 6647 

GREAT CATCH 
Actve. tecum and romantc OWPU. 49. 510*. 1 B3b* . wM 
trown haa/eyet, •*» anpyi rjman out darong ind am. 
•eeka a corrpetcto SWF. 4045, tor t pMtCJl LTFt MtSu 

MUCH TO OFFER 
Humoroua SWPU. 44. 510*. 1 72to» . wth Mown her and 
btoa ayaa. who anpyi eporto, dtww out end a* Into of 
rrvae, teaki en dMctvo. tarn SF. Ad* 4653 

JUST AROUND THE CORNER 
New n town, be SWU. 33. Sir. 210b*. w*h brown ha* 
end green ayes, pan* be gMM and Met to cook, H* wanto 
to mad a SF. 1845. who anpy* tivd. gamg to tw baech 
and eptortog new tang*. AdtJWM 

A GOOD CATCH 
Caihofc SW dad. 39. ST. 170M, wen Mack tat end Mown 
eve*. « kjrjbq tor a taxm, rtoned SWF. 54-45 tor a pot- 
iterak*tonahpAd«1S78 

GOLF4PAFBS 
SWU. Si Sir, 200ba . anpyi goetoa btrng. twarmng. 
bJMMR end more, la BO a prnardc SWF, *555. *r a got 
parbM and much mar a t» be totore. AM 4636 

EASY RIDER 
Tnou^AoWfcjoa^SWM45 6".190tot,«r-rit*/err<»trd 
btoa aye*, la a imokar who anpyi tprtef punutt and 
fT Pt cr cye ln g Ara you toe aovertunua SF ha i been bokjng 

mjmam 

HARLEY RIDER 
GdovM to your phone and eel hrn, bia bv»i Wwro 
SWU. 45. Sir. 195bt, wth ftafta l and btoa ey e*, today. 

Ho wjpyi tfmtTmiSL rrdfeTig ho new"*"**-, tm ttJUpOQ met lm 
w*rat W ar^gd.aeornp»»^5f.34-52.Ad*J700 

SOUND LIKE YOU? 
*aa*.21.beaihocejigpootrrorwa.end p to| iu 
He vawu e kad. camg SBF. 1 8-28, who knowe wrw 
wanto out MtMAMStX . 

LOOKING FOR YOU 
He i e ton. eaaygotig SWU. 41. 510*. 170b*, wM 
hertye*. wta u, toctong M t kad littdal. do 
SF. 36-50. tor a poeatMietoMndwj. AM 2221 
SERIOUS REPUCS OHUf 

KMdMMTtlBOMeaabtMt'ad^eMWMBS'g 

BtManddoawx^kyanwaiDnarw) Aatitn 
COOKS COCrWUeT DaNNERS 

swh ix sir. ixx». w*> i 

■ a Ouarwaa oww. a rwvwy cwrwr, 
*MlWwjbrawaWatectuM5WF,404ar*iV 
pretor a to* keje-awM redhead. Mt MM 

ARC YOU THE ONE? 
A briny, fomanrc gwr »no anpy* wortr^ on canv cavrpr«o 
and more, tat SVAr. 26, ST. wdt dart har.-eyat, teeka a 
competed SWF, undar 29. br a poadoto retoeonthp. 
AM 5512 

aNTEORmf 
Harowcdung and ccntdarato ta td reapenebto SWM. 39. 
S6*. 150ba.. wth brown tat; btoa eye* end godee. He 
anpytatercee. got, Mrbacua*. watung toe dog. lehta. 
ardieeki an honed camg SF. 35-45 Adt 4572 

ROAD TO ADVENTURE 
Chackc^talcc»btaS-rtU52.S'ICr.nwclumr A ab.brown 
hai'ayai. who enpyi c*m».d*. tow rrwAae. !«►.« and s 
hopng ta trd Twi ipacwJ SWF. 40-53. * penorjUa OAa, 

who tneiea he totoreeta and w botong bi ewemtogU 
toenoshb.A4l.7972 

GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY 

Oud. camg. Mnptoyed SW Md ol kao. 26. 510*. 250*0*. 

wth brown ha* and green aye*, who enpn rnovwe, ouktoor 

sardmor ' 



enpyi baTdnto. bowing, horiabeck rdng and I 
a retpacttot SWU. 2*W5 MI2536 

MANY OPTIONS 

Paoonttto. cdtoota SWF, 46, who enpri rmtoa. board 
gamea. concara, laand*, ipormg evanta and mere, e bdung 
br a SWPU, 4555, MS, who • tecure and gocd^urcrad. 
MI1689 

EASY TO PLEASE 
Ktonett camg. pe-atonela SWF, 45. ST. 200b*, wth brown 
har. ay as, enpyi be OUktoo-l, i-nmmna ouktoor concert*, 
■bvtat Md quM eewnjnga. Sha'i BO a 5WM, 45-55. a MS, 
c*tudom*ar.M*563l 

SUMMER A HARLEYS 
Asractve SWF. H 5T. torn nkjrtrwed todtane, ertfyt outdoor 
acfMtoe*. Sna uatj 1 hanSorw, macuUf. conitrurton rypa 

men, a SWU. 3949, to; a potitota rMiorwhp Ml 9736 

RCAIANCE IS AUVE 
Lovta DW rrotier. 40 57. 100b*. wot brown hak/eytt, 
leeU a toaJwcrby SWU, 38-43, who enpyi bt eddoort. 
rcltorbltota. laadta, votonto M work tnd more Ad* 5517 

CHECK IT OUT 
StoCM*. honed SWF, 25 S«*. wth MM aye*, e bctong far a 
bvta. tond SWU. 25-34, br a poaitoto lewkonehp. Ml 7734 

YOUR LUCKY DAY 
t^iygobg, rwr**y DW mcber ol two, 23, 57, 210b*. wdi 
brown har and btoa aye*, it teetong in MTfMB uncara SWU, 
25-40, who anpyi mones. tabng writ, mutoc, Mitva 
Amarcan an and mere. Adl .4080 

A LOT OF FUN 
FurHowg SWPF. 29. 54*. wan ouny red h** md btoa aye*. 
who enpyi ttvekng. ccobng, moviea and apendtog kme wan 
ktono% teak* a SWU. 27-35 Ad* 964 7 

LOOK OVER HERE 
ABract.* SWPF. 49, SS*. w* reddwMjrown htf. who enpjr* 
tMkng, movwi and dnng out s awAng b hear torn a SWU. 
4940 Adl 7064 

COMPATIBILITY 
Outoota r^eucnal SWF, 50, S *', w* btonda he* and 
brown HM who anpyi iporta, laadtog. penkng. dtw« out toe 
betM and mora, m teetong a ton-tovrg. uncw* SU, 4055. 
wan irrww Intoresb. Ad* 6974 

LETS TALK SOON 
Etiygota SW mom, 48, 57. 145b*, win gray ayaa. who 
anpyi M ouktoori, camptop, county rrmc. good WMrtoV 
ton and more, ta boking tor a i-xm* SWU, undar 55 
Ml 8*28 

DAY BY DAY 
Abactor* SWF, 32. who enpyi kehta be btetor end more. M 
being br a cams. bn-o«mg SWCU. 30-40. *ro hat • good 
tana* ol humor. Ad*.7960 

IT'S NOT TOO LATE 
Alectond* SWF. 61, ST. 115b*.. wen gray hat and hud 
ayaa, wstet b mad a compaibto SWU 60W. br wonderki 
fcrrwetooebar.AdJ.U14 

G OAL-ORI ENT E D WOMAN 
lovta, lenadva and rtMuwortong. td SWF, 37, 54*. 150b* . 
wth btonda Ml and green ayaa, enpyi wato. gardenmg. dene- 
tog. rnovto* and rretong new twnd*. Sta i*wU a compakMe 
SWU, 3545 wth t greet tan** or humor. Adl 6910 

CHASING A DREAM 
Happy SWP mom, 44. who anpyi rrotorcycto*. iperidng km* 
ai be part, muuc and bng wakt, ta hoping to mad a wtry 
SWPU, 40-50. who hai t good tenia ol humor. Adt.VI* 1 

DYNAMIC 
StocMe SWF. 49. ST. 1 SObe. wan btonda tai and btoa aye*, 
who enjoy* garctonbg and mora. It botong br a tond, tomg 
SWU, 45-55 Ml **7f 



Known to be a conganM, wanrtheartad guy bel .Mtowaeejm- 
rnta, geeJwta be beete. and danemg. bta SWM, 60 511*, 
test* . wan brown heanryaa. hopea b mad t erdbr SAPF, 
unoar 60 M* 7271 

LOOK TO THE FUTURE 
Say hdta to td amy, totorettng SWU. 48, 510*. 190b*. e* 
Mown tar and green ayaa, today. Ha enpyi H iAj r r. y cli i u .twi 
dog*, be outdoor*, and teak* en honed, M l oUntarl SWF. 
under 48, bra LTR Ad* 5833 

LOYAL A HONEST 
Trad younM to e great tana w* torn, bta retted yd outoamg 
SttU. 65, 6. 200b* . arm gray r*r and btoa ayat. Wio anpy* 
fta»dna dtwng out got. end more. He* ISO I tecum SWF. 
6055, & a potabto rMtonehip. Adl 6374 

SERIOUS ONLY 
WWHM, 45. leeka a LTR wdi an honed, laxda SWF. uncw 
47. to anpy dnng out dancng. and wafu by be Me. 
Adl 4772 

HOPEFUL ROMANTIC 
1*. phyeoUy kt SWM, 39. dart hat and held aye*, who 
eraoyt wortong on can. nvtorcycto no**, moord waJuj and ta 
Mate a hardy SWF. AMS5S2 

LEAVE YOUR NUMBER 
SAU. 3t, SW, 135b*, dark hat and green eye*, who a kwnd- 
V and anpyi mov**. reackng. natord beauty, ta atatong an 
horw*tbw>gSF.21^38.Adl3272 

M SEARCH OF YOU 
Hurrorou* SWU, 46. ST. 155b*, wth bbnd har and btoa 
eye*, who enpyi ge-Jenbg. campng, canoamg end mar*, ta 
botong br a buttrfy. honwtl SF, he^l* and wwgM picporttoriato, 
apt Mt-rporkwl wan a tent* d humor. Mi 4274 

BEST THERE IS 
Outaotog SW dad, 32. ST. w*h bbnd hai and btoa rye*, who 
anpy* cw ottoocrv a kxajr>g tor a ton-tovng S'nT. 2Md »no 
hm cm* an, br a poatbto tang-iarm iMkonthv Ml 4787 

FEEL AT EASE 
Outootog SWU. 3 1 . 6". ITOba, wen Mown Matoyet, who be* 
tpandta tone wan bend*, boakng and pwyrg got, n teetong 
a torvtovrg SWF, 2535, who bee b go out and have a good 
rare Ml 5635 

UNTIL NOW 
Amtofcc. emptoyed SWU. 46, 5. 175b*, wen brown hat. who 
anpyi tong weft*, dnng out and i«*ar» Hal botong br a 
herdk hurrorou* SF. undd 55 AdIJOSO 
TOGETHERNESS 
A-ecaontto, oulgora SWU. 46. 166b* . wen Mack hat and 
bwan lye*, who wipyi gotta, rnovwe end deneta Mil » 
teerch el a tweet toncere SWrTundd 51 Adl 2698 

MAKE IT WORK 
Mrtrrtorou* SWU, 25 ST. 150bt. who arjor* toctbaLio*- 
bal ard ptoyta pod Ha'i bokrg tor a SWF. under 30, to 
-:Adl6013 

GIVE ME A CALL 
Hat a Oependebto SWU. 43. ST. maotom bdkt wth brown 
ta* and held eyet. who erdy* eporta. eatCb lock muatand 
tokra waft*. Shanng kiardvhn and rnutod towreiawthicon- 
IcwnL compatbto. SWF, 3*45 ta whet hat hoping tor. 
Adl 8614 

ATTRACTIVE TEACHER ■ ,^i 

5ML2l.C,iJSU.^iWV&ti*r*i*^!ttfvai 
ktwe*. rnovto*. comedy, ptoyta poot torrwk crwei, eporta, ba 
outdoor*, romantc moorwt wak*. end qvd tone*, teeka ■ 
SWF. under 39. tor a bnp/torrn ratotowhp, Adl 8643 

SOUTHWEST SUBURBS 
Thta vary tiectonato SWU. 45 6*. a ■ MntoOwmtJdbM 
odMrdenta, who It atao en tnimd end naMa bvd He i ISO t 
SW age itwreoiunl Al cab mtorned Ml 8461 

LETS BE CANDID- 
Gttitoly emptoyad. bta muttachad SWU, 45 ST. ISBbt, 
w* brown hat/aye*, tore* t»d. pardenmg. rnone*. Md dt> 
nj qui Hai bcktog tor a SWF. 35-50. tor inendthp, Adt 7253 



l leadta, mute and mare, ta teetong an MJMtL i»> 
cm* SWF, 2S-3 1 . who bee chldreri. Ad* 6740 

TO SHARE MY TIME 
Oukxang SWU, S3. ST. ■ a btoweyed btord, who be* dn- 
ng ouL bowkng. dancng. and be ouboora. He' » tawAtog i 
camg SWF tor MtTMtaMdM Ad* 2444 
ZEST FOR UFE 
Fufrtovta and goc<r4ajnnd, bta rnjeeutar SWU, 23, 5. 
185b*.. kke* be ouktoor* end working wen toe hand*, and 
»awU»camgSWFtoribng-w*T-fwaionihrj Adl. 435 1 

HANG OUT WITH UE 
Brown-eyed bbnd SWU 20, IT. IBSto*, a imokar. ta kaww 
(X-taoj ard anpy* tatoong. wrwng and pwyng mu*c Ha 
i4wiit5WT 1 l523,wroweUJtoato*pendquB*Tyfcmawa 
tomwone apactot Ml 4387 

KNOWS WHAT HE WANTS 



SWU. 27. ST. 235b*. wen brown hat end green . 
anion jporu. wonung out b*ta. tw outooor* and mora, 
wedV to md a loJaWtva SWF. 24-35 Mt J9B2 

TRUE FK>UANTtC 
Er*wwaa*erd|^a*'yl"*twita0WU.M,6r. I90to*. 
MS. He bvea oud Mdi county mute and Ine dmoend 
leeks a SWF, 2MS. br a lono/torm retakonehe. AMJ&S7 

LOVE AWAITS 
5AU.49,5'IO*.whoarwicta»*«carvratwrtr;'^aj and 
more, w bctong tor a i-ed. Ulcere SF, 3f>SVAdl7280 



iperd kme wth, i 



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C 1 0/ Lakeland Newspapers 



- :\f 



COUNTY 



October 1,1999 




Rachael crack corn 

Rachael Kraak, 9, of Salem, Wis. shells corn to make corn meal 
during Farm Heritage Show at the Lake County Museum in Wau- 
conda . — Photo by Sandy Bressner 



DIVORCES 



Aug. 5-11 

Faye and Paul Marshall; Margari- 
ta Arclza and Manuel Salgado; Mar- 
garet and Harry Anderson; Anne Berg- 
cr and William Bergen Sandra and 
Glen Blanche tt e; Betzabct Flgucro and 
fosc Castcrjon; Colleen and Todd Cur- 
tis; Julia and Ramon Florcs; Barbara 
and Thomas Foley. 

Diana and Fred Grant; Claudia and 
Michael Grclsz; Erlka and Hugo Her- 
nandez; Pamela and Scan Hoover; De- 
bra Jones and Muslo Rosas; Valeric and 
Ryan Lcgg, Elvrcc Smith and Ronald 
McAllister Diana and Louie Pavelchlk; 
Ann and Tim Ruiz; Mary and Jose Vlz- 
carra Jr.; Virginia and Timothy Bclcc; 
Jennifer and James Billy, Jr.; Janncl and 
lose Borunda; Roscmarlc and Michael 
Eccarius. 

Mclanlc and Darren Gructzmach- 
cr; Laura and Jay Katz; Lynn and Va- 
lerie Klcper; Cora and John 
Lcwandowskl; Jutta and Raymond 
Lu tz; Mary and David Matzl; Maria and 
Glenn Mciselman; Rose and Victor 
Moreno; Audra and James Matter; 
Michele and Joseph Perry; Beth and 
Bruce Richman; Letlcia Guevcra and 
Juan Ruiz; Orysta and Irvin Slcgle; Pen- 
ny Blubaugh and James Thumm; 
Heather and Alan White. 



Aug. 12-18 

Barbara and Gerard OToole; Deb- 
orah and Gregory Adams Sr.; Svctlana 
Basov and David Barg; Cathy and Juan 
Diaz; Marian and Martin Frantz; Dcbra 
and David Jewell; Michelle and 
Thomas Kupfcr; Candacc and Robert 
Quecncy; Heather and William Schncl- 
den Jaml and Michael Skccns; Karen 
and Lorry Tcncnbaum; Sharon and 
Joseph Plante; Jean and Bogdan 
Jancewlcz; Virginia and Wayne Grego- 
ry; Klmbcrll and Michael Drew; Diane 
and Gerald McDcrmott. 

Avlva and Steven Monk; Joan and 
Jeffrey Power; Evangcllna and Toby 
Trabcrt; Krlstcn andMIchael Brown; 
Carlnc and Johan Bacck; Deborah and 
Michael Liguori; Patricia and James 
Loan Susan and Anthony Wclssgerbcn 
Dapnc and Dontc Wright; Arlenc and 
Donald Crow; Sharon and Jeffrey Son- 
dcrman; Antlonctte and Gregory 
Sinter; Guadalupe Paz and Martin 
Valadcz; Kim and Eric Nlemcsz; 
Florlnc and Raymond Steltz; Deborah 
and Frederick Doctor; Paula and Clyde 
Kay; Ma Elena and Jose Salccdo; Dcna 
and Michael Blake. 

Aug. 19-25 

Victoria and Kenneth Ralncro; 
Wanda and Russell Collins; Klmbcrly 
and Garry FIshman; Jacqueline Octker 
and Shane Pflstcr; Dcnisc and David 



Bessette; Geneva and Joseph Zborals- 
ki; Maria Carrclo and Alberto Arctnlc- 
ga; Patricia and Richard Bumlcn Maria 
and Alcxandro Garcia; Coronlca and 
Dion Green; Crystal and Steven 
Llewellyn; Margarita and Frank Dodds; 
Helen and Larry Benson. 

Cathlcen and Gerard Frcderichs; 
Sherry and Daniel Boadl; Azuccna 
Sanchez and Hector Galtcgos; Frcdo- 
nla and Eddie Washington; Marjorlc 
and Miles Cunningham; Rebecca and 
Manuel Scrna, Jr.; Patricia and Tcr- 
ranee Kerns; Eloisc and Gordon Ben- 
son; Dccbra and David Nlmcrov; Lcti- 
cta and Gary Swanson; Zora and Todd 
Lcvandowskl. 

Tcrrl and Scott Hnnauer; Jennifer 
and Chad Eastcrbcrg; Rebecca and 
Robert Schorf; Elizabeth and Patrick 
Looby; Janet and John King; Maryellcn 
and Michael Perry; Laurie and Kevin 
Ahmcn Elslra and Erllndo Castellanos; 
Diane and Thomas Hardy; Gwenna 
and Norman Pretlow, Jr.; Darlenc and 
John Wclsman; Gloria and Carlos Zari- 
nana; Patricia and Patrick McCowan; 
Mary Bcmardl and Mario Modlca; Kei- 
th and Jill Krausc; Jennifer and Scot 
Fcnstcric. 

Aug. 26-Sept. 1 

Sally and Greg Krausc; Evelyn 
and Calvin Sparrow; Paula and Jeffrey 
Hubbard; Klmbcrly and Paul Neville; 
Consuclo and Antonino Sanchez. 



FROM PAGE CI 



BUDGET: More officers 



latest County Board meeting, 

Noilcnberger said the county's 
property tax levy will rise slightly by 
2.9 percent. However, that increase 
will be offset by the anticipated 
growth of the county, which is pro- 
jected to rise 2.8 percent. 

"All the entire new taxes are 
being paid for by revenue growth 
so the existing taxpayers will not 
see any additional burden from 
the county, not even inflationary," 
he said. 

Noilcnberger said the only major 
Increases in the budget will be in the 



law enforcement and criminal justice 
areas. 

Ten more courtroom security of- 
ficers will be added in the sheriffs 
department under the budget plan. 
This will allow the department to re- 
assign five existing deputies at the 
courthouse to highway patrol posi- 
tions. 

Lake County Sheriff Gary Del Re 
is pleased the proposed budget pro- 
vides additional money so the de- 
partment can expand its highway pa- 
trols. 

"This is something 1 feel very 



strongly we've needed for quite some 
time," he said. 

Del Re said the total number of 
calls sheriff's deputies arc respond- 
ing to has increased dramatically in 
recent years. Between 1997 and 
1998, for example, there was a 
37,924 increase in total calls. The 
number of DUI arrests also rose 
dramatically: from 322 in 1997 to 
462 in 1998. 

Del Re said he plans "a creative 
deployment" of the new officers to 
expand patrols during peak demand 
times, typically the evening hours be- 
tween 6 p.m. and 2 a.m. 

"I think it will enhance our pres- 
ence throughout much of Lake 
County," he said. 



Noilcnberger said the budget also 
includes some additional staff in oth- 
er areas, such as another public de- 
fender and another person in the 
recorder's office to assist with court 
automation. 

Noilcnberger made a more de- 
tailed presentation of the budget to 
the board's Finance Committee Sept. 
22. 

Committee meetings on the pro- 
posed budget will be held throughout 
October. The board will review the 
budget as a Committee of the Whole 
on Nov. 5 and final adoption is ex- 
pected on Nov. 9. 

'Ih e proposed budget is on file at 
the County Clerk's Office and avail- 
able for public Inspection. 



VA: Fighting budgets cuts 




And that is also based upon the con - 
corn we've heard expressed by the 
community," he said. 

A federal advisory committee 
has recommended drastic cuts in 
VA services at the VA hospital, in- 
cluding the possible relocation of 
all inpatient services to other facil- 
ities. 

Allen said there 51,000 veterans 
in Lake County, about half of whom 
are enrolled to use the medical ser- 
vices at the North Chicago VA. 

"Every effort should be made by 
all concerned to prevent the loss of 
veterans services in this area," said 
Allen. "The loss of hospital would 
create many problems for veterans in 
this area, particularly older vetcr- 
ans. 

The Veterans Assistance Com- 
mission is not affiliated with the fed- 
eral Veterans Administration and 
gets most of its funding from Lake 
County. It provides food, financial, 
housing and emergency assistance 
to indigent veterans and also serves 
as an advocate in helping veterans 
gets benefits they deserve. 

Local veterans hope the rally will 
bring more attention to their cause, 
and it is hoped, make federal officials 
reconsider the cuts. 

"The more people get involved 
the better it is, just like any other is- 
sue," said Phil Mazur, a Libertyville 
veteran, who just learned about the 
rally this week. 

Veterans efforts to block the pro- 
posed cuts appears to be gaining 
momentum. 

Judy Martini, chairman of the 
Lake County Board's Legislative and 
Intergovernmental Affairs Commit- 
tee, requested the county seek a con- 
gressional hearing on the reduction 
of services at the North Chicago VA. 
The committee unanimously sup- 
ported her recommendation, which 
will now be considered by the full 
board. 

"I do believe veterans should 
have an opportunity to have their 



concerns addressed (in a congres- 
sional hcaring),"she said. 

In addition, veterans will now 
have a little more time to state their 
case about detrimental efforts that 
relocating services would have on 
Lake County vets. 

U.S. senators Dick Durbin, D- 
111., and Peter Fitzgerald, R-Ill., pro- 
posed an amendment in the Sen- 
ate that would give veterans group 
more time to review and respond 
to the proposed cuts at the North 
Chicago VA and other Chicago area 
VA facilities. 

The amendment would bar the 
Department of Veterans Affairs from 
implementing the proposed cuts 
without first releasing a specific plan, 
consulting veterans' groups and oth- 
er interested parties, and gathering 
information on possible effects the 
cuts would have on veterans' access 
to medical care. 

The VA would then be required 
to report its findings to Congress and 
wait another 60 days, which would 
allow Congress to consider the find- 
ings. 

"We have brought this matter to 
the attention of the Senate and our 
colleagues have agreed that this is 
not a change to be made without 
considering the implications," 
Durbin said in a prepared statement. 
"This gives us time to evaluate the 
impact these proposals will have on 
Illinois veterans." 

Drian Stoller, a spokesman for 
Fitzgerald's office, said the amend- 
ment basically slows the process to 
give veterans more time to give their 
input and hopefully the VA will re- 
consider Its plans, 

But Mazur said he believes the 
only way to prevent the cuts from 
happening is for veterans to contin- 
ue their fight and make their voices 
heard. 

"Now, it looks like they're trying 
to delay closing (the hospital) and 
they think we'll just go away. We're 
not going to go away." 



: Many boaters unhappy 
with substantial price hikes 



cost to the agency, and the purchase 
of disposal sites will eliminate that 
expense, she said. 

"This is giving us a chance to 
make a big step in the right direction 
. . . and to provide more and better 
services to the boaters of our 
agency," she added. 

Many boaters, however, argued 
the fee increases are too high. "A lot 
of people are upset about it," said 
Mike Lovergine, president of the 
Chain O* Lakes Powerboat Associa- 
tion. 

Lovergine said the fee increases 
for 2000 are 50 percent or above the 
1999 level. He said the association 
felt the increases should have only 
been 25 percent, and not have ap- 
plied to homeowners who live along 
the river and already pay high prop- 
erty taxes. 

The fee Increases for the 2000 
year are as follows: 

• Non-motor boats of 17 feet or 
less will be charged $10. Previously, 
these boats were exempt. 

• Class O licenses: Non-motor 
powered boats of more than 17 feet 
in length will increase from $10 to 
$30. 

• Class A: Motor powered boats 
of 15 horsepower or less will increase 
from $15 to $30. 

• Class B: Motor powered boats 
over 15 horsepower, but not exceed- 
ing 25 feet In length, will increase 
from $40 to $60. 

• Class C: Motor powered boats 
over 15 hp, between 25 and 30 feet in 
length, will increase from $65 to 
$100. 

• Class D: Transferable plates for 
dealers and antique boat owners will 
increase from $65 to $100. 

• Class E: Motor powered boats 
over 1 5 hp and greater than 30 feet in 
length will increase from $100 to 
$120. 

There is also a revised fee sched- 
ule for Class L licenses {livery boats). 



This involves rentals involving a fleet 
of 10 or more boats less than 17 feet 
in length and less than 25 hp. Ryck- 
mansald this usually applies to com- 
mercial fishing boats. These fees will 
increase from $1 to $20 per boat. 

A separate class also was estab- 
lished for Class P licenses, or person- 
al watcrcraft such as waverunners. 
The new fee for personal watcrcraft 
is $60. Previously, personal water- 
craft fell under a Class B license des- 
ignation with a $40 fee. 

Board directors voting in favor of 
the fee increases were Jim McKinley, 
Marshall Lowe, Pam Althoff and 
Mike Mueller. Wayne Black was the 
only member to vote against the in- 
creases, widi William Hauck abstain- 
ing. 

McKinley said right now the 
budget is so tight die agency basical- 
ly only has money to cover day to day 
operations of the waterway. 

The additional fee revenue will 
allow the agency to move forward 
with a 10-year program to clean up 
the Chain O' Lakes. One of the first 
steps in that process was the devel- 
opment of the gcotube on Grass 
Lake. The geotube uses the latest 
technology to remove silt from Grass 
Lake and to create an island on the 
lake for rare species of birds. The 
agency will also be able to expand its 
dredging efforts with the additional 
money, he said. 

McKinley said he doesn't wish a 
fee increase on anyone, but he said 
the fee increases are needed because 
state money to support the agency 
has been limited in recent years. 

If more state revenue were to be- 
come available for the agency's cap- 
ital improvement projects, he said 
the board may consider reducing the 
fees. 

"We're not trying to create a bur- 
geoning bureaucracy. We're just try- 
ing to get money for needed pro- 
jects,** he said. 



ROUTE 53: 

Opponents of 
plan pleased 
with anti-toll- 
way stance 

considered. Other alternatives in- 
clude widening Routes 83/45, adding 
additional lanes to Route 1 2, expand- 
ing Route 120 with a possible bypass 
of Grayslake, and adding new lanes to 
1-94. , - 

Lutyens said environmental im- 
pacts are one of the major factors that 
considered in any road project, 
whether it be Route 53 or the other al- 
ternatives. 

"We're looking at the environ- 
mental Issue carefully because we 
know that's an important considera- 
tion of any alternative that is looked 
at," he said. 

Lutyens said he is still hopeful the 
project will have a recommendation 
as to alternatives somedme nex sum- 
mer. 

In the meantime, the governor's 
comments have given opponents of 
Route 53 renewed hope that the high- 
way project is in trouble. 

"1 think Gov. Ryan's remarks arc 
just another sign that the future of 
Route 53 looks increasingly bleak," 
said Mike Truppa, communications 
director for the Environmental Law & 
Policy Center, which opposes Route 
53. 

Truppa said Route 53 "just does- 
n't make sense" from a political 
standpoint or as a matter of sound 
fiscal policy "so It's not surprising to 
see the governor expressing concerns 
about the project." 

"Gov. Ryan's remarks are an apt 
reflection of the growing concern 
Lake County residents have about a 
new tollway that would result In ma- 
jor population growth and a sys- 
temwide toll hike," he said. 

Meanwhile, Dennis Cullotan, 
deputy press secretary for Ryan, 
pointed out that the governor's com- 
ments were not necessarily intended 
to express opposition to the Route 53. 
"He wants to take a look at It. 
He's not saying he opposes it, he just 
says he'd like to take a lot at it," said 
CuIJoton. 

Culloton said the governor sim- 
ply wants to review where the Lake 
County Transportation Project Is at to 
ensure that whatever decisions are 
made are in the best Interests of Lake 
County residents. 

"He wants to make sure whatev- 
er decision Is made is in the best in- 
terests of the region, from, an envi- 
ronmental perspective, from a traffic 
perspective and from efficiency per- 
spective," he said. 



\ 



ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT PREPARED BY LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

1999 FOOTBALL PROGRESS REPORT 



October 1,1999 



Lakeland Newspapers) 'C1 3 





Above, it all bolls down to unity, team spirit, and the drive to be number one, as 
demonstrated by the Warren Blue Devils. Below, wide receiver Jake Volgt mus- 
cles out a first-down for Ubertyville, a team off to a 4-1 start. 



Above, Mark Pumell and George Girten stymie the opposition's rushing attack in 
a recent game while Grayslake running back Joe Kupfer (bottom) looks to turn 
the comer. 



That was then 



1. Ubertyville 

2.Antloch 

,. • - .- . _ 

3. 

4.Wauconda 
5. Carmel 




6. Johnsburg 

7. Mundelein 

8. Grayslake 

« 

9. Grant 

10. Round Lake 



At midseason point, area football 
teams jockeying for position 



This is now 



1, Ubertyville 
2;Antioch 

3. Warren 

- * ■ ' 

4. Wauconda 

5. Johnsburg 



6. Grant 

7. Grayslake 

8. Mundelein 

9. Carmel 

10. Round Lake 



Oh yes, it's officially fall 
and that means football 
season shifts into high 
gear! We've just passed 
the midway point and some teams 
are experiencing anticipated suc- 
cess while others are struggling to 
find or rediscover their identity 
needed to produce that winning 
formula. 

In the always tough North Sub- 
urban, Warren has resurrected its 
chances for the postseason berth 
and perhaps a conference title after 
posting big wins over Ubertyville ■ 
and Mundelein. Ubertyville, mean- 
while, still looks to be the power 
along with Stevenson in the NSC 
But beware of Antioch, winners of 3 
in a row before being cooled off by 
Ubertyville last weekend. The po- 
tent arm of quarterback Don Lack- 
ey hasn't been a factor, but the Se - 
quoits dangerous running attack 



has made the Sequoits even more 
versatile. \ 

Mundelein got off to a fast 2-0 
start but has since dropped three 
straight Don't count them out y,et 
for a postseason bid. Crosstown ri- 
val Carmel remains in the thick of 
the Catholic Metro Green race at 1 - 
1, while johnsburg and Wauconda 
have been in every game this year . 
and have" their eyes set on the post- 
season as well. 

The upstart Grayslake Rams lost 
their first two but have since won 2 
out of 3 to remain in the tough Fox 
Valley race, while Round Lake start- 
ed 1-0 but has since fallen to 1-4. 



Grant sports an impressive 4-1 
record but three of its wins have 
come against cupcake teams from 
the Chicago Public League. 
Nonetheless, the Bulldogs have % 
out-scored the opposition 216-55 in 
five games and look to be on a colli- 
sion course with the playoffs as long 
as area touchdown leader Aaron 
Behm, who has 1 2 on the year, ' 
keeps finding the endzone. 

(Editor's Note: Turn to the A 
section of sports for game 
coverages and standings) 

Please see FOOTBALL /C16 



PEBBLESMRE 



4*. - . .*«■■ ^~ ' 



all City Hotline 
847/223-9000 





Help Wanted 

ESAKPS S&KBR^ 

Part-time Weekends 
Call 

(847) 548-9920 

206 PI. Rt. «3» Grayslake 





e to 



l&2Betfro6a 

6Wpe^oretan4D 
$T r Vernon Hills \ 
vehiently locate; 
Hawthorn Ge 

wmm 

Maria (847) 367-4504 



i»it»iV^\'. 




C1 4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



!#■ 



is 



• 




PRESENTS 



.»»■ 







hey are there every game: Al- 
ways smiling, alwayssupport- 
ive. The cheerleaders of Lake 
County's high schools provide 
the vivid pomp that sets oYir 
emotions soaring. 
If the athletes on the field arc the heart 
and soul of a sporting event, cheerleaders 
arc the spirit. They arc the lifcblood of the 
excitement we feel, the embodiment of our 
pride. Cheerleaders provide a spark, serving 
as brokers of excitement. 

Through pyramids, jumps, lifts and 
kicks, cheerleaders share athleticism with 



the on- field performers. So much more 
than providing support for the athletes and 
their endeavors, they provide their own per- 
formance. Together with the drama and 
emotions poured onto the court or field, the 
work of the cheerleader is combined with 
that of the other athletes to create a kalei- 
doscope of power and excitement. 

Lakeland Newspaper photographers 
have joined forces with Designer Robert 
Wulff to bring you the drama and color of 
these talented young ladles, to tell the story 
of these often unsung heroes of the side- 
lines. Enjoy! 








-'«* -^^** ■ • .. 



OUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 5 



| 

■7. 



£. ' 




V •" ' ' 






C1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



1999 FOOTBALL PROGRESS REPORT 



October 1, 1999 



FROM PAGE C13 



r\ 



If. 



m 



i 



FOOTBALL: Mid-season 



progress report capsules 

DIG NORTHERN (RED) 

luihauuh 



CxSkiihauiks 

is 



lohnsburg 

Current record: 4-1,1-0 
Last year: 8-2 

Key players: QB Brad Toussaint 
(Sr); LB/FB Ray Hass (Sr); OL 
Ryan Zoiss (Sr); WR Ben Jnnik 
(Sr). 

Down the stretch: The Sky- 
hawks improved to 4-1 overall, 1- 
N in the Big Northern (Red) after 
an emotional double-overtime 
win over previously unbeaten 
Burlington Central last weekend. 
Johnsburg looks poised for yet 
another playoff appearance, to 
which they are no stranger in re- 
cent years. The Skyhawks passing 
attack has yielded great results 
under the direction of signal- 
caller Brad Toussaint. "We've 
been playing pretty steady," said 
head coach Bob Bradshavv. The 
rushing defense has been hold- 
ing its own as well and will be 
needed if Johnsburg is to ad- 
vance in ihe'playoffs. 
Mldseason grridc-A-i 

NORTH SUBURBAN 



White (Jr); LB Kris Vanderkooy 
(Jr); LB Conrad Adkins (Sr); 
RB/LBMarkPurnell(Jr). 
Down the stretch: It's been a 
little different for the Scquoits 
with the pass setting up the run 
in most cases. Antioch has not 
had to rely on the arm of quarter- 
back Don lackey, which is good. 
That's because a dangerous and 
diversified rushing attack, ted by 
the likes of Adam Nlles, Mark 
Purnell, and Adam Durham have 
the Sequoits in the hunt for an 
NSC title. The defense, behind 
Kris Vanderkooy, Conrad Adkiris, 
and a host of others has held its 
own but if ACHS seeks success 
with the playoffs around the cor- 
ner, it must limit big plays by the 
opponents in the early-going. 
The Sequoits have been able to 
overcome them but that might 
not be possible about a month or 
so from now. 
Mldseason gradc-B+ 




->l 



*2^& 




■ LU» 



Warren 

Current record: 3-2, 2- 1 (NSC) 
Last yean 4-5, 3-3 
Key players: FB/DE C.J. Cuskcr 
(Sr); DL/OL Joe Doering (Sr); 
WR/DB Josh Gray (Sr); RB/DB 
Matt Vandaele (So); RB/DB Tom 
Depietro (Sr). 

Down the stretch: The resur- 
gent Blue Deils have won two in 
a row after starting the season 1- 
2. Running back Matt Vandaele 
leads the areain rushing and 
Tom Depietro has added to a po- 
tent Devil ground game. C.J. 
Cusker, Joe Doering, and Brett 
Seng anchor a solid defense. If 
the Blue Devils are going to make 
the playoffs, they must cut down 
on the penalties and mimiizing 
big plays by the opposition. 
Mldseason grade-B 



Libertyvllle 

Current record: 4-1, 2-1 (NSC) 
Last year: 10-1,7-0 
Key players: RB Aaron Anton 
(Sr); RB/DB Gerett Burl (So); 
WR/DB Jake Voigt (Sr); QB/OLB 
Chris Dydo (Jr). 

Down the stretch: The fate of 
the Wildcats will rest primarily 
On the ground attack, which has 
been anchored thus far by two 
bruising runners in Gerett Burl 
and Aaron Anton. Ubertyvillc 
was unbeaten up until a shock- 
ing loss to Warren, but if it can 
et past Stevenson and North 



hicngo, they should have a clear 
road/o the North Suburban Con- 
ference championship. 
Mldseason grade-A- 





Antioch 

Current record: 3-2, 2-1 (NSC) 
Last year: 6-4, <1 -3 
Key players: QB Don Lackey 
(Sr); WR Jim Richardson (Sr); RB 
Adam Niles (Sr); WR/OE Eric 



Mundelein 

Current record: 2-3, 0-3 (NSC) 
Last year: 3-6, 2-5 
Key players: QB/DB Ben 
Hodges (Sr);TE/DE DrewSimo- 
nis (Sr); RB Mike Vucovics (Sr); 
RB/DB Josh Gruencwald (Jr). 
Down the stretch: After a fast 
2-0 start, the Mustangs seemed 
to have lost some steam, as well 
as a way to put points on the 
board. A loss to cross-town rival 
Libertyville in week 3 started a 
three-game skid, but the Mus- 
tangs enter the soft part of their 
schedule with the only big hurdle 
being Stevenson. If they can 



VHXAGE OF ANTIOCH 

& 

PARKS AND 

RECREATION 




874 Main Street 

Antioch, IL 
(847)395-1000 



miraculously win their remaining 
four games, the playoffs await. 
However, that will be a tall order. 
Mldseason grade-C 

Fox Valley 



Independents 




Grayslake 

Current record: 3-2, 3-2 (FVC) 
Last yean 2-7, (2-7) 
Key players: QB Willie Wright 
(Sr); LB Sam Stahnkc Or); RB Joe 
Kupfer (Sr); DT Rob Pejry (Sr); 
FB? LB Brian Grewe(Sr). 
Down the stretch: Hie Rams 
would be sitting pretty if it 
weren't fortt second week over- 
time loss to Crystal Lake Central. 
But Grayslake, after starting the 
season 0-2, has rebounded in 
winning two of its last three. But 
the meat of a tough FVC sched- 
ule awaits and Grayslake will 
have to "turn it up a knotch," ac- 
cording to head conch Dan Dil- 
lon. "Even if we can finish above 
.500 (5-4)-that's nothing to be 
ashamed of. Grayslake can 
suprisc some teams and contend 
for a playoff spot if the defense, 
anchored by Stahnkc and Petry 
keeps improving and the arm 
(and feet) of quarterback Willie 
Wright keeps producing like it 
has. Running back Joe Kupfer 
had a breakout game two weeks 
ago. 
Mldseason gradeO 

Catholic Metro (Green) 




* 



Round Lake 

Current record: 1-4 
Lost year: 5-4 
Key players: WR/DB Albert 
Lozano (Sr); QB Dallas Bassctt 
(So); DE Quentin Davis (Jr); C/G 
Matt Rapier (Sr). 
Down the stretclnRound Lake 
started the season with an Im- 
pressive win over Wcstosha, Wis., 
but It's been downhill since then 
as the team has dropped four 
straight. The offense Is solid and 
clicking with quarterback Dallas 
Bassctt and split end Albert 
Lozano carrying most of the load. 
But the defense had relinquished 
too many points, especially early 
In the game, and penalties have 
not helped matters. Round Lake 
probably won't make the play- 
offs, but they can still put the 
points on the board and play the 
role of sleeper to many teams 
that might otherwise look past 
them. 
Mldseason grade-D 



anchored by Ken Shlpbaugh at 
strong safety, cornerback Bran- 
don Flynn, and Steve Ahlberg at 
tackle. Shlpbaugh has also been 
a force In the backflcld and Teel-' 
Ing and Flynn are talented se- 
niors. Wauconda has strong se- 
nior leadership and has played a 
tougher schedule in '99. The 
Bulldogs should go at least 6-3 
and get another snot in the 4A 
playoffs as It closes out Its final 

Sear as an independent. 
Ildseason grade-A 





Wauconda 

Current record: 3 : 2 

Lost yean 7-3 (lost 1st round 4A 

playoffs) 

Key players: G Scott Nebcl (Sr); 

QB Matt Jensen (Sr); RB Larry 

Teellng (Sr); WR John White (Sr); 

SS Ken Shipbaugh (Sr). 

Down Die stretch: The run- 

and-shoot style offense has been 

guided by senior quarterback 

Matt Jensen, while the defense is 



■ Grant 

Current record:4- 1 
Last yean 5-4 
Key players: RB/DL Robert 
Reyes (Sr); FB Leo LaBrlc (Sr); QB 
Aaron Bchm (Sr); RB/S Taylor 
Schmit (Sr). 

Down the stretch: Improving 
on last years 5-4 record and mak- 
ing the playoffs are definitely In 
Grant's favor. Quarterback Aaron 
Behm Is on a tear, leading the 
area with 15 touchdowns (as of 
press time). The Bulldogs, be- 
hind Behm, can score in bunch- 
es, but three of Its wins are 
against easy Chicago Public 
League teams. Not that Grant is- 
n't good, but the Bulldogs need 
to keep up the intensity on de- 
fense If It looks to make any noise 
in the playoffs. Bchm will break 
his mark of 884 yards rushing 
from a year ago. 
Mldseason grade- B+ 

In formation and statistics 
compiled by Rob Backus, John 
Phelps, Steve Peterson and Jan- 
nan J. KIturL Photos by Sandy 
Bressner, Joe Van Zandt, Lynn 
Gunnarson Dahlstrom ana Can- 
dace Johnson. 



Carmel 

Current record: 2-3, 1-1 (Cath. 
Metro Green) 
Lost year: 4-5, 2-3 
Key players: QB Pat McMahon 
(Jr);RB Eric Luna (So); LB/RB 
Jermaine Freeman (Sr); LB 
Stephen Crawford (Sr). 
Down the stretch: The Corsairs 
got off to a shaky start at 0-2 but 
have since won 2 out of 3 games, 
the only loss by one point to Gor- 
don Tech. The defense has really 
stepped to the forefront, led by 
Freeman (26 tackles, fumble re- 
covery, int. return forTD) and 
Crawford (71 tackles, fumble re- 
covery). The rushing game has 
been consistent behind Luna. 
But for the Corsairs to have any 
latc-scason success, the passing 
game, led by McMahon, must 
continue to gel. If Carmel can 
win its next three games, they 
will make the playoffs as the 
Catholic Metro Green champs. 
Mldseason grade-C+ 





LAKELAND LEADERS 




. ~:i 


PASSING 










Name, team 


ah. 


COMPt 




YDS. 


us 


Don Lackey, ACHS 


in 


61 




. 813 - 


2 , 


Brad Toussaint, JB ; 


101 


54 .'■ 




745 


9 


Brad Jensen, WHS \ 


87 


39 




675 '.. 


,4 


Dallas Bas sett, RLK 
GhrisDydo.LHS 
Willie Wright. GLK 


87 


42 




600 


A; ' 


68 


.-91 " 




557 


7 


68 


35 




527 


.3 


. Ben Hodges, MHS 


'■' 52 


21 


1 


355: 


■ Z.\ 


Pat McMahon, CHS 


85 


27 




312 . 


i : 


RUSHING 












Name.leajro 


ATX 


f 


YDS, 




ID 


Matt Vandaele, WTHS 


O 75 




680 


- 


n 


Aaron Behrrii Grant 


54 




623 




12 


Aaron Anion. LHS . 


67 




564. 




6 


v MlkeReardon.JB 
Ken Shlpbaugh, WHS 

Adam Nlles, ACHS 


93/ 


i 


"541. 




4 


67 




406 . 







1 92 


* 


378 




.6 


. Josh Grucnewold, MHS 


. 75 




366 




,5 


Eric Luna, CHS 


67 




323 







Joe Kupfer, GLK 


71 


* 


264 




2 


RECEIVING 


, 


- 








Name, tenm 


RECa" 




YDS, 




ID 


Eric White, ACHS 


28 




417 




4 


, Leo Carpenter, JB 


21 




300 




5 


Albert Lozano, RLK 


13 




300 




2 .. 


Eric Peterson, GLK 


13 




225 




2 


Eric Lemcke, Grant 


10 




133 




1 


. Jim Richardson, ACHS 


11 




132 


• 2JH 





Aaron An ton, LHS 


8 




132 . 




« 


Gerett Burl, LHS 


5- 


J 


127 


'.- 


3 




Grant y Council 

of Teachers 

AFT/IFT 




Community 

& 

[Police 

Together 

to make for a 

stronger 

tomorrow 

Round Lake 
Police Dept. 





October 1, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C1 9 



pHff 



ll Help Wanted 
U Full-Time 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



PHARMACIST 

Immcd Opening for 

F/T reg'd 

Pharmacist. Sal & 

bnfts ncg. 

217-744-3654 






RECEPTIONIST 

Immediate opening 

available al our Lake 

Zurich facility for D/D 

adults. Must be available 

Monday through 

Thursday, 5 pm to 9 pm, 

and Saturday, 6 am to 

2:30 pm. Non stressful, 

Entry Level, typing a 

plus. If Interested, 

contact Ml St Joseph, 

847-438-5050 



Looking for hard surface 
flooring Installers. Only 
experienced Installers 

need apply. Call: 
566-5990, ask for Doug. 



r FACTORY 
HELP 

Specialized paper converter 
seeking individual (o operate 
corrupt or & secondary 
equipment: band saws, 
panel saws, fjuc spreader, 
etc. Must be able to lift 50 
lbs., good understanding of 
basic math, speak & under- 
stand English, read tape 
measure & have reliable 
transportation. Only those 
who really want to work 
need apply at: 

TBICIl CORPORATION 

2100 Swanson CL 
Gumee, IL 



SUBSTTnJTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further information. 

Requirement - Bachelor's Degree 
& Substitute Certification 

Adlal E. Stevenson High School Dist #125 
Two Stftcnson Drive, Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

Contact: Personnel x 320 (847) 634-4000 

Antloch Community High School District #1 17 
1 133 Main St., AnUoch, IL 60002 

Contact: Marie x224 (847) 395-H2I 

Antloch Elementary School District #34 
800 N. Main St, Anlkxh, IL 60002 

Contact: Peggy (847) 838*100 

Aptakistic - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Wetland Road, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak. (847) 634-5338 

Beach Park School District #3 
1 131 5 W. Wadswonh Rd .. Zion, IL 60099 

Contact: Jackie Grana. (847) 599-5O70 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N. Ir*y 12, Ingleide, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms. Buchner (847) 587-6800 

Deerfield School District #109 
517 Deerfield Road, Dccrfiekt, IL60015 

Contact: Denise DiClement x232 (847) 945-1844 

Fox Lake Grade School District #1 14 
101 Hawthorne Lane, Fox Lake, IL 60020 

Contact: Bill Lomas (8*7) 587-2535 

Gavin School District #37 

36414 North Ridge Road, Inglcside, IL 60041 

Contact: Mrs. Griffin (817) 973-2370 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Antloch, IL 6O0O2 

Contact: Patti or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake Community High School, District #127 
400 N. Lake St, Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Lam Madole x!2I0 (847) 223*621 

Grayslake School District #46 
625 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL60030 

Contact: }m Fabry xMOO (847) 223-3650 

Gumee School District #56 
Spautding, O'Plaine, & Viking Schools 
900 Kilboum Road, Gumee, 1L60031 

Contact: Sheila, . . (847) 336-0800 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL60061 

Contact: $\iA)sm\i. (847) 367-3279 

Jolmsburg School District #12 
2002 W. Ringwood, johnsburg, IL 60050 

Contact: Diane Kofler (815) 335-9233 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Decrpatli, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie . . (847) 604-7423 

Lake Villa School District #4 1 
131 McKinley, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kaihy. (847) 356-2385 

Mlllburn School District # 24 
18550 Millbum Road, Wadsworth IL 60083 

Contact: Bemadelte (847)356-8331 

North Chicago Community Unit School District #187 
2000 Lewis Ave., North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Annstrong (847) 689-8150 

Spring Grove District #1 1 

2018 Main Street, Spring Grow, IL6008) 

Contact:]^ (815)675-2342 

Wauconda School District #118 
555 N. Main, Wauconda, IL 60084 

Cb«tocf;Valxl04 (847)526-7690 

Woodland School District #50 
17370 Gages Lake Rd., Gages Lake, 1L6O03O 
CbHJWc/.MIchelle (847) 856-3605 



Help Wanted 
Full -Time 




fi Help Wanted 
1 J Full-Time 



■^ Sales "k 
Person 

needed for flooring 
store FT/PT, Flexible 
Hr.v Experience pre- 
ferred, bur will train. 
Contact Dougs 

(847) 566-5990 



SECURITY 

PROFESSIONALS 



A world leader In 

protective services 

has an excellent 

opportunity for 

dependable 
Individuals in the 
Northern suburbs. 

• Mall security 

• Premier office 
locations 
Excellent wages & 

full benefits. 

For consideration, 

please call 

(630) 620-0273 
The Wackenhot 

Corporation 
EOE-M/F/D7V 



ASSEMBLY 

"Se llabla Espanol" 

50 jobs Immediately in 

Gumee. 1st & 2nd Shifts. 

Collate Insurance 

paperwork.- Assemble 

mailings to clients. 

Bilingual a plus. 

847-548-4200 



Hou M >Wp< n q 



North American 

Paper Co. 

will be opening its 

NEW, 

stato-ot-tho-art 

facility In Glenview 

on OCTOBER 4th 



VVfcOTwrjBrtrbcte^taMrc 



STAFF CLLMMG 




Rtiporulblt for ptrfofmtnf 
(mini mm«M houicfa up - 
Inf tacttoni, Incfudkw floor 
imlnnranca (hardteods, 1N0- 

§t oAcciim 0QMf pMnH cm* 
todbn dubcLlUquirtt prntad 
rtUud work cmrfcna In 

tnxu6* t 1 tobta work binary. 
W> oBw 1 compf ihomtwt Urv 
cflapfcg,lndudn| mcdaVtfcn- 
ulMilon/tir* Int. * 401 K. 
PlttM vpftf In pwnon. W» 
will b* m u pd ag *pflk»~ 
Horn itartMf Oetooor 4th 
»c North American Papor 
Co,, 2101 CUIra Court, 
Gknrkw, IL. 



Orfcen/Schoof But 

Drive For Laldlnw... 
You'll Find Many 
Points Off 



Free tt»aining| J- ^^^tegwp : 



T 



SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS 



m 




NO BCKBtENCf REQUIRED 

DrMng a school bus a few hours each clay for Laldlaw 
Transit an be so rewarding! 

t $11.00 Per Hour (Higher For Permitted Experts) 

• Dental and Blue Cross/Blue Shield Medical 

• Paid Training 

• No Nights or Weekends Required 

• Summers I Holidays Off (Summer Work Available) 

• Advancement Opportunities 

• Pre-Scnool Children May Ride On Bus With Parent Driver 
(At Most Locations) 

• INDEPENDENT WORK ENVIRONMENT! 

We Carry The Nations Future" 




Call 847-634-0331 

SERVING THE CHICAGOLAND AREA WITH 20 LOCATIONS 

Equal opportunity Emptoyer "New nlrei onfy. For most bottom. 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wuted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Fuil-Timc 



Looking for 

cashiers and 

crew leaders. 

I Competitive pay, 

1 week vac. 

( paid after 1 yr 

! service. Medical 

benefits 

available. 

Call James at 

847-367-8969 



RETAIL MANAGERS 

Hobby lobbf CrrtJw Cento, ooe 
M America's total gtuvtagaftt 
ind enrfu dutns looted I* owf 
IK taut, b rqwodiw rapidly Wo 
ttiaRnbnd via* bu lirnmriiMt 
ojxninp. loaOy »d vCtmOj, 

tOt OMmOHBB Rtll IB M Itf t% 

The flrongeH aadtdiia «tl be 
>df -inMhnitd . retail oriented 
tpm **h aperinrc *ad back 
grand in ntus ocicuAubto^ 

• Coapcdthc Silirkf 

• 40 IK Flu 

• McdtaLDatJl 

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Experienced mad ntuitffn 
jfcnuld tend resmee *M 

rrfcrmca to 

itonrr 

LOUT 

7707 ST 444 Snsi 

OU*bo«uQ»r,«73l79 

ta# (405)M$-I«6 

ASk BS Own 

SecKac 



LDLIFEJOBStO 

$21.«VHR 

irtC BENEFITS. GAME 

WARDENS, SECURITY. 

MAINTENANCE, PARK 

RANGERS, NO EXP 

NEEDED. FOR APR AND 

EXAM INFO CALL 

1-800-813-3585. 

EXT 2407 

8AM-QPM. 7 DAYS Ids Inc 



i,4H 



Customer Service 

ICall Today, Work Tomorrow! 
]EamuptoS13/hr. 

Put your upbeat problem-solving 
L'rsonality to good use. < 

ever.il openings in Buffalo Grove, i 

I Deerfield, Glenview. < 

I Work in an independent, friendly environment. < 
J Paid Training Provided! Minimal Customer 
(Service Exp. Req. 

Call Heather Today! 

847-52Q-7300 • 

Fax:847-465-2028 




A TRADITION 



m 



MAINTENANCE 

Seeking professional 

maintenance person for a 

FULLTIME position in 

Grayslake and Island 

Lake. The successful 

candidate must possess 

maintenance skills and 

must be able to work 

around others. Full time 

compensation package 

includes health and dental 

insurance, 401 K and paid 

vacation. Interested 

parties, please send your 

resume and or letter of 

inquiry with salary 

requirements to: 

Meridian Group, Inc; 

104A Maple Court 

Hocncllc, II, 61068 

1-815- 56M867 

EOE 



CfHH&OSStOK 

Frea tin tMoast yw volt lirapji f J 
ex* doon. ywl f«i c seost el ma- ^^. 

ariprooddoaoaoreritroorMto *T/"" ^ 

WCO0TQQIS COHDQSSJM GRd SHDOflS \dr^tr 

tadviduots wik opportvotfy for pmou and praltssiooci gnnA. 



COOK 



mpari ol M low lor M poon toy lot, c off ana and spaa oospn 
Funct io n s, muriog on soft hMopvohn bob foovf genciBcs on avL 
lospicJ loos for propor knit, Hspnln ono oppouon, om noort oool* 
ty ond owDtify prouHQS to Pt prooortioo nooootc f nrnphtt pup work w 
m iood doyi prodooloo, propinV bbd and sJort prodods, oMdm'ad 
iooloi work otobl bop occuraio prodoolofl records, qimIos recce, to 
me«J potJeflB' dietory feqwretnerts. 

Wi preftr Co ond otoi win fsmi tc uti rt ioo is csJiutiood tooidog ond 
4+ yton 'profenJooai tookiog aptritoc*. HaA tfjlsoadoMobitytainip 
to SO pooBB ore nodoi 

Our cscvuuaot location, oennoa Mhoouo ond Okboo. standi bo 
best ood oniri ojoiot lostsn ool niooj wan oiasy toencjoona, csBurd ond ooV 
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loteAonwiooa^dtldtaittooo^ 

send o usaat \o: U Sokts hWtkaro Sntoai, be, 3U1 SprUa 
StTMt, Room, Wl 53405; Fox 414-636-4133; Plane 41 4-636- 
4294; Imct orUOOoxtq>u90L Ws ore oa oand opooronoy capioy- 
or ood nontaa o icii work tsmaauA nroooh pos) -oHtc dreg tufiog. 



TO 



All Saints Healthcare Sy stein 



r 



irasseaexs 



Graphic Design 

supervisor 

Have you been in a 

graphic design team 

environment for two 

years and are ready for 

the next challenge? Do 

you have leadership 

potential and a good 

understanding of 

graphic design software? 

if you do, Lakeland 

Newspapers has a 

position for you as an 

| entry level team leader 

supervising the ad 

design team, with 

potential for future 

growth. 

Send or FAX jour 

resume to: 



Lakeland Newspapers 
Attn: Ncal Tticker 
( 30 S. Whitney SL 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
FAX: (847)223-8810 

BBBBBBQPPBPB QBt 



1 



apOBBi 



_ ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALD1 ALDI ALD1 ALDI 



CASHIERS ITOEDED 

$10.00 Per Hour 

Applications arc being accepted from persons inleresied in working in a 
grocety store «i\1ronmeni. 

KesponsibiUties will include prompt, courteous customer service, accurate cash control, 
efficient operations of the scanner cash register system and stocking merchandise. Must 
have a high school diploma or G.E.D. 

Cashiers needed who arc wanting to work 20-35 hours per week wilh hill 
benefits. Must be available lo work anytime between 6:00 am and 9.00 pm, Monday 
through Saturday. 

Also need cashiers who are Interested in working under 20 hours per week wilh no 
benefits and a flexible schedule. Saturdays mandatory*. 

BENEFITS FOR CASHIERS WORKING 20-3S HOURS PER WEEK 

• Paid Major Medical Insurance 

• Paid Dental Insurance 

• Family Medical & Dental Insurance For $50/Month 

• Short Term & Long Term Disability Plans 

• 401K Plan 

• Retirement Income Plan 

• Six Paid National Holidays Per Year 

• One Paid Birthday Per Year 

• One Paid Personal Day Per Year 

• One Paid Kickoff Day Per Year 

• Three Paid Sick Days Per Year 

• Paid Vacation After 6 Months of Service 




■H 



ALDI 



I© 



Positions available in Park City, 

Round Lake Beach and Waukegan, Illinois HOLIDAY INN 

An ALDI Representative will be available for 61 [J 1 West ** ran , d A ^" ue I 

you to apply in person from Gurneo, Illinois 6003 

1 2 noon - 7 pm on Monday, Oaober 4, 1999. at: EOE/MF 



ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI 



JOB FAIR THURSDAY 



3-7 p.m. IMMEDIATE TESTING AND INTERVIEWS! 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

POSITIONS LOCATED AT OUR WAUKEGAN FACILITY: 

• Customer Service Representatives 

• Warehouse Picker/Packers 

• Administrative Assistants 

• Entry Level Accounting 

• Internships 

BENEFITS INCLUDE: 

• Bonus, Incentives, 40 Ik Savings. $JJJ 

• Medical / Life Insurance. 

• Educational Reimbursement. 

• 16 Paid Days Off / 8 Paid Holidays each year. 

• Workout Room, Sauna, and Jogging Trails. 

• Cose to 1-94 and 137. 

Recent college graduates encouraged to apply. Immediate 
testing and Interviews from 3 - 7 p.m. on THURSDAYS al 
our Human Resources Recruiting Center 



ULINE 



Shipping Supply Specialists 

950 Albrecht Drive 

Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

Far (888) 847-0354 

Phone: (847)295-0710 

No appointments necessary 






' 



■HHHi 



■'*—'- *y • r ■^-•'f-*******.****** 



C20 l Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



October i, /999 



1 i 



-/ 



, 






I 

V 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE 

Arc you interested in growing with a 
dynamic company? 

Do you have collection or customer 
service experience? 

We will train ilic rlftlil candidate. 

Great benefits and flexible work schedule. 

For an Interview all Toni at (847) B87-850K or 

fan your resume vviih cwvr teller to (847) HH7-H50I. 

■""^ nnlltnvimmilllimiBIIIIILMIini 



Round Lake 
Roller Rink 

Emiuo's Pizzeria 

now hiring dependable 

dew erv drivers, 

KITCHEN AND 

COUNTER HELP. 

Mum Ik able In work nights 

and weekends. 

Competitive Wages 

I>j\tinic (847) 878-4870 

Evening (847) 546-9572 



I* HELP WANTED 

Assistant to Iho manager 
Private estate/horses, Anfoch 
area, grounds & building 
maintenance. Will train, 
some exp. & skills helpful. 
Great opportunity, benefits & 
salary. Six days, including 
Sat. & Sun. 

Reply to: Horse. PO. Box 
265, Antioch, IL 60002-0265 



Printing 



* Exp. Press person 

* Flexo-wcb labels, 
1-S/C 

* Press Person 
(Held, 1/C, Chief, Mufti) 

Island lake 
847-487-7700 



'^ -m- CHEVROLET 

IWECA STOR£ 

Accounts Payable- 
Seeking exp, A/P clerk for a full-lime position, MF, 8-5, some 
overtime. Auto dealer exp. a plus. Apply In person. 

Finance Clerk 

Full-time, 8-5, M-F, some overtime, exp. preferred, hut will 
train. Apply in person. 

1000 C. Belvidere Rd. 
Grays! akc, IL 60030 






[Full Time 
• PRODUCTION 
MANAGER 
Benefits Included, 
Mon-Fri days. 

Full/Part Time 
FOOD SERVICE 
WORKER 
STOCKERS 

Excellent Hours! 
Great Pay 
Please Call 

847-270-3083 




Free Training 

A great opportunity to loom tha exciting & 

profitable mortgage profession. 
New Mortgage Company Opening in Yolo is offering classes in: 

• Interviewing 

• Client Processing 
•Loan Origination 

Wc will be hiring for the above part & full lime 
positions from those who wish to attain 

exceptional earnings. 
• We also need several bilingual people. 

Call for details 
(815) 344-8005 






FOE 



;'.-'.■'■'■' .•'.- :':-.'':*:■!.■ 




MEDICAL 






rtiSMfear 




.iti-SulfJs** 



MEDICAL ASSISTANT 



Exp. FT for busy medical 

office. Rotating Saturdays 

AM '$ and closed 

Wednesdays. 

Forward resumes to: 

Pinto-Thomas MD's 

2-18 E. Grand Ave. 

Fox Lake. IL 60020 

Attn: Janis 

Fax: 817-587-1839 

or call for an interview: 

817-587-6333 

10am* 6pm 



LABORATORY CLERK 



(ierk who will be responsible 

for clerical and computer 

duties as well as assist 

hlmratory stall. Chosen 

candidate will bt* computer 

literate, as well as Iiavv medical 

leniiinolngy experience. Past 

experience working in a 
laboratory Is preferred For 
confidential consideration. 

send/fax resumes lo 
Deerpallt Medical, Attn.: 

Human Resources 

71 Waukecan Rd. Sic, «)0<) 

Lake lUuff. IL 6004-1 

Fax: (817)295-1547 



Health Care 

MEDICAL 
TRANSCRIPTIONIST 

Full-Time 

|9:00am - 5:30pm 
We are seeking a flexible, 
confident individual lo loin 
our medical office. This 
j position 15 based In our 
JGurnee facility, selected 
candidate will not Ik able lo 
work from home. Proficiency 
with medical terminology & 
| radiology as well as mini - 
'mum 50 (iO wpm mtuired. 

We offer a compelitivr salary 
l& benefits package in a 
leading edge environment. 
Forward resume or apply in 
person to: 

M.R. INSTITUTE 

OF LAKE COUNTY 

Attn: Office Manager 

60 S. Grccnlcaf 

Gurnce, IL 60031 

EOE M/F/D/V 



CNA/AIDE 

Intermediate Care 

facility for woman with 

Developmental Disabilities 

seeking CNMIDES. Full and 

part lime shifts available. 

Willing to train, experience 

not required. 

Contact ML St. Joseph 

847-438-5050 



Lake County 
Primary Care 

Physicians office seeking 

RADIATION 

TECHNICIANS 

in our 

Gurnce & Antioch 

office 

ConLtcl Pal @ 244-4190 

or Lvnne@ 395-9180 



Hi-jlihGreMrlivuv 



Activity Program 
Coordinator 

(Alzheimer's Unit) 

HCR'MjiiuiOrc a national leader In 
skilled nursltiR and Alzheimer's 
assisted thing, has an netting 

opportunity al M jnorCirv 
UbrrtvMUe! 

Responsible fur aulaing In die 
pluming jnJ linplenu-nuilnn iA 
actlvlly programs for uur Alihetmer's 
unit. Reporting tu the Activity 
Oirectur, this person will h»v 2 
years actlvtilrs anuVnr rtcrwliiin 
experience In an Auheimers setting 
preferred. Ilir*cver, *v»ill train. 

Ccimtxiitlvv salary and eteellent 
benefits offered. For nmsidcratlon, 
send vrntr resume or apply In 
person at: MinorCare-UlieiiyvlUe 
I$IX)S. Milwaukee Aw. 
Uberr>stlle.lL(it)048 
Telr. 8t7.-«l6-3iW) 
Fjv:*U7-«I6* 1 )8I FOE 

ManorCare-Libertyville 






ileal tli Care 
X-RAY TECH 

Victor) 1 Memorial 
Hospital lias an excel- 
lent opportunity avail- 
able in a clinic setting 
in Grayslakc. Must be 
an experienced X-Ray 
tech wtiii phlebotomy 
skills. The ability to 
work Indepcndantly Is 
essential in this flexible 
part time or float posi- 
tion. 

We provide an excel- 
lent salary and benefits. 
Please apply in person 
or send/fax resume to: 
Cindy Ball 
Human Resources 
8-17-360-4170 
VICTORY MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

WaukeRan, IL 60085 

Fax: 847-360-4230 

email: luunaure- 

sources@lcqnncct.net 

Equal opportunity 

employer m/f/liA' 



LPN/RN 



Seeking LPN/RNs in our 
Lake Zurich Intermediate 
Care Facility. Need part- 
time 10 pm to 6 am, 
and full-time 10 pm lo 
6 am. Every other week- 
end a must. If interested, 
contact D.O.N. 
Ml. St. Joseph 

847-438-snsn 



Sheridan Health 

Care Center 

invites you to join our 
staff of dedicated care- 
givers. Seeking RN/LPN 
for days and PM's, full 
and part time positions 

open. Competitive 

salary! Call Julie Stang, 

ADON for details and to 

schedule an appointmenL 

847-746-8435 



tMedical Office 



large Medical Office in Highland 
Park seeking team oriented 
individuals to join our 
professional stall. Full and Part 
time positions available. 
RN/IPN 

front Offtc Reception & Billing 
(previous experience preferred) 
Medical Records file Clerk 
Message Center - telephone 
Communications 
Challenging posiliom that require 
good communication skills and 
willingness lo work Saturdays. 
Excellent benefits. Near train. 
847-433-3460 Ext 267 






.' Xcatthcart 

CNAS 

The Victory Lakes < 
Comnung Care Center vat- : 
3-uev ycxjr etpenence and 
skrts as a CNA. Our mrumLnt , 
pay rate is $8 58/hr or rugrv 
^.er wrth e*oer tence 
Ftfl and part-time ocoortu- 
nities are avtf able on van- 
4 curs shifts. Must be certified 
in nroK or dose to comple- 
tion We offer a fun benefits 
}. package if you work more 
than 20 hours/week. Please 
apply in person at 
victory Ulct* 
continuing car* 
c«r»t«r 
10S5 East Grand Avenue 
lincfenhust. il 60046 
PU B47.356-4SS1 
eoe m/f/d/v 



Hcilih Care 



Attn: Classified 

Advertisers 
Deadlines for ads 

are 10:00 a.m. 

every Wednesday 

Morning. 




mam 






NURSING ASSISTANTS 



If you ore currently enrolled In CNA classes, or are already 
certified, come seo what the Care Centre has lo offer youl 
Our team-oriented approach lo care and our supportive 
friendly environment is sure to please you. A starling salary ol 
$975 and a whole range of benefits, including 2 weeks ol 
vacation demonstrate our commitment to securing high 
quality staff. This is exactly what you have been searching lorl 
Full-Time and Part-Time available, must bo a loam player. 
Apply In person at: 

CARE CENTRE OF WAUCONDA 

176 THOMAS CT. 

WAUCONDA, IL 60084 

047-526*5551 

FAX# 847-526-0807 



"i 



Your Future is 

Bright in 

Libertyville 



If you're ready to bring your friendly and 
compassionate altitude to a company dedicated 
to excellence, we want lo talk to you! 



CNAs 



Contact us for shift availability! 
Full-time and part-time openings! 

ManorCare-Libertyville is currently seeking 
CNAs to join our bright and dedicated team! Enjoy 
working in ih is beautiful health care facility 
which is deficiency-free and enjoys an excellent 
reputation In (he community. 

As part of HCR'ManorCarc, we offer competitive 
wages, excellent benefits package for our Full- 
Time employees lo include: health, dental, 401 (k) 
and more! Please apply in person: 

ManorCare-Libertyville 

1500 S. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, IL 60048 
Tele: 847-816-3200 
Fax:847-816-8981 t oi= 



RN'S/LPN'S 

We need FT & PT 
Nurses. Our team of 
healthcare profession- 
als is looking for addi- 
tional members. We 
offer advancement & 
educational opportu- 
nities as well as a 
supportive environ- 
ment. Will train & 
orient new grads. 
Awesome new salary 
& benefit pkg. - - 
Check us out. - - 
Send resume or apply 
In person at: 

CARE CENTRE Of 

WAUCONDA 

176 THOMAS CT. 

WAUCONDA, IL 60084 

847-526-5551 

FAX* 647-5260807 




Health Care 

Cortdell Medical Center, located 
in Ubertyville, is currently 
seeklng an energetic, self- starter 
lo |oin our JCA1IO approved 
Home Medical Equipment train 
is* 

HOME MEDICAL 

DELIVERY 

TECHNICIAN 

Full-Time, Days, 
Rotating Call 

You will deliver durable medical 
equipment as well as 
iroubltthooi and perform minor 
equipment repairs. We seek a 
mechanicallv' inclined individual 
preferably with a medical 
background or prior experience 
in Home Medical equipment 
deliver) The ability to perform 
heavy lifting, a valid IL driver's 
license, a IIS diploma or 
equivalent and the ability lo read 
a map are required 

Lji]ov a competitive salary, 
excellent benefits including 
access lo our Inlergeneralional 
ilavvarc center, irn'mlicrslilp dis- 
counts in our Centre Club 
fitness facility and more! In 
addition, we also offer paid 
lunch breaks, a 7 1/2 hour day 
earns vou H hours of pay. l'lease 
mail, tut or e-mail your resume, 
with salary requirements, lo 
Condeii Medical Center, HR Dept 
J03 Cleveland Ave. 
Ubertyville, IL 60048. 
Fax: B-17-918-8309. 
E-mail: condellir@lhenmp.net 
Phone: 847-482-2905 x52.W 
For additional opportunities, 
please call our Joollneal 
8-17-573-1305. tOEMT/DA' 
wvw.condcll.org 

o 

Cbntld! Medial Cbntcr 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



BURS! 

lumoKXi 
50* ELECTRONIC 
OPENINGS 

• Bench Techi 

• Teit Techi 

• Quality Techs 

• Group Leaden 

• Bio-med Techs 

• SHT Solderen 

• E/H Aisemblen 
Immed. long term career 
position! in NW suburbs. 
ail/Send Reiume EOE 

847-7.SS-8444 

Fax: 847-2S5-869I 

KAY AND ASSOC. 

3820 H. Ventura Dr. 

Ariingion HU..IL 60OO4-79SI 



w 



SOCIAL 

SERVICES 

DIRECTOR 

I.TC f.ritity wckinR F/T 
«»ri*l icnrlce dlrrrtnr. 
Mu«l h»*r * BS ileptrr* 
anil ttnr jrmr r*\trrirnr* 
in ■ health retain] Hrhl. A 
\*<>}>U tirlrnlril |wr«»n In 
intrract with our i;rri»1rir 
|Mi|nil«iirni and thrlr Tarn. 
iliri. F!l|irrlrnrr ' prr- 
frnril 

Mmirfrii SarilrUi 

Ailmliii'lraiiir 

l^ilii«lini llrallh Cari? 

( Irlllrr llf I ,«!««■ Zllrir II 

QOU S. Itaml It.l. 
I.«kr /urirh, II. AOO t7 

(tl 17) 726-1200 
FAX (847) 726-1 265 



SCHOOL BUS 
DRIVERS 



Park City 

KM 7) 244-5C30 

Lake Forest 

(0471 C0O9XXS 



*TayUara 



$ll.40/hr 



T^Ryder 



^VgeJJW. 




COMMAND 

^yus out 



/Paid Training 
/Annual Bonuses 
/Tuition Assistance 
/FREE Shuttle to Work 
/Child Care Assistance 
/Various Shifts & Hours 
/Paid Holidays & Vacations 
/Medical/Dontal/Ufe Insurance 




••>A\ v? »^v >•'. ■ .\ v 



How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Salcol 



0: 1 interviewed with two companies in the put few weeks for 
simitar positions. Both had an additional interview to complete 
before being able to make a final decision in their hiring process. 
1 have been unemployed for 7 weeks now and am eager to get 
myself back in to a corporate environment. Company A said that 
they would have an answer for me by Friday. Company B is aware 
that I am awaiting a possible offer by Friday, and said that they 
felt I owed it to myself to hear what that offer would be. They 
were willing to wail until Friday to see what they needed to com- 
pete with, or they would even try. I am interested in Company A. 
because it has room for growth, but requites some light travel. 
The salary being offered for Company A is a bit lower than 
Company B, however Company B is a larger company with out- 
standing benefits. Company B said that they would wait to hear 
from me on Friday as to whether or not a job offer was presented 
to me. On Wednesday, a few days early, Company A made an 
offer lo me which was five thousand dollars higher than had been 
anticipated, putting them in the forefront for salary, but still lack- 
ing the outstanding benefits of Company B. I decided to contact 
Company B and let them know that I received an offer from 
Company A, and told them the amount of salary I was offered. I 
also explained that I would prefer lo work for (Company B) and 
was hoping to hear from them soon, and 1 did. Late that after- 
noon. I received an offer from Company B who matched the offer 
of Company A , and I told them that I would get back lo the id that 
day with my answer. This is where everything went wrong. I 
called Company A and told them that I had another offer for the 
same amount of money and was hoping they they could go up 
another thousand dollars, but this would mean that any reviews 
within the year would not allow for any monetary Increase in 
salary. I then called Company II and informed them that I had a 
call from Company A increasing the salary of the position. They 
Immediately told me Uiat they wcie going to rescind the offer, as 
they were not the type of company that allows themselves to gel 
into a bidding war. So much for company II. 1 then called 
Company A to let them know that I would accept their offer of 
employment and was told that (hey would like to see me in their 
office that day. I showed up at the scheduled time and was 
escorted into the Human ilesource Department where I was told 
that the offer 1 was given was recanted. No oilier reason was 
given, iiere I am still unemployed. What did I do wrong? D.K. • 
Mundelein 

A: Whewwww, what a story. Backing a company into a corner and 
putting ihem in the middle of a salary war is not a good move. 
Both companies had other things I am sure to take into consider- 
ation when making your final decision. No matter how much It 
must have meant to you to get as mudi as you could for yourself, 
what it did. was let each ol those companies know that if you 
accepted the position, it was going to be for one reason 
only...NOTniKniGliT ONE THEY WANTED. 

Note: Nancy Sakol U ■ licerurd pertannrl profmlonil 
and President of Superior Personnel In Gurnre. 

Letlert on be lent lo Nancy Stkol 

do Lakeland Newipipen, 

P.O. Box 260, Graytltke, IL 60030 

PLACEMieaoLtom 



H 



•— v. . - - 



tetober 1, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers t C2 1 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Warned 
FuU-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fulh-Ttme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full -Time 



y i 



oi i u i: ru:i:u 



Great day Itoun. 
So crctiliifi<* or 

weekend*. 
Excellent Pay. 

Pleoitc call 
(HX7> 270-ttOW* 



Full or Part Time j 

Teacher 

deeded for 
J Richmond Pre-SchooL j 

s 



s 



Call Michelle 
815-678-4842 



OPTICIAN FT/PT 

For private growing 
Ubertyvtlle optometric 
practice, exp. preferred. 

* 847)362-5444 



Driver/Owner 
Operator 

Immed Opening. Must have 
own (racior & 5 4yn OTR & 
forklift exp. F/T steady work 

w/jgood pay. IL area. 

219-663-5678 M-F 



COOK 



Intermediate Care 

Facility has immediate 

opening for a full time 

Cook. I lours required: 

10:00 am to 6:30 pm, 

must be available every 

other weekend. Health 

care experience 

preferred, but not 

required. If interested, 

contact 

Dietary Manager, 

Ml. St. Joseph, 

847-438-5050 



Screw Machine 

Operators Wanted 

Immcd Opening. Largest 
archery mfr in the world 

seeks Screw Machine 
Operators for Galnsville, FL 

High growth co., 4-day 

work week, 401K & bnfu, 

Outdoor oriented, people 

friendly co. & community. 

Home of the University of 

Florida Gators. Resume: 

Golden Eagle/Satellite 

Archery. 1733 Gum Hwy, 

Odessa, FL 33556 

Fax 813-261-7738 



'DRIVERS* 

immed Openings. 
Local trucking co. 
seeks qualified trac- 
tor/trlr Drivers to 
haul OTR, regional. 
Must possess 3yrs 
verifiable tractor/trlr 
driving exp. Drivers 
must be able to pass 
DOT & coastal quali- 
fications. We offer" 
exc pay & bnfts. For 
info 800-569-0900 



ASSEMBLERS 

Fast growing established 
North Suburban 
manufacturer of precision 
Z machined parts seeks 
ff Assemblers to |oin our 
** A.«cmhh/T3ckagjnR 
™ Department. Must be 
9* dependable and be able to 
Ip read and write In English. 
JM1 We offer competitive wages 
M and benefits package fn a 
m team orJeiiied environment. 
r_ Call or apply in person to: 
Human FMiourct* 

Helio Precision 
Products 

Ml N. SkottM Highway 

Ut* Blurt. ILM044 

647-473-1300 

EOEM/FTtW 



-\v, 



NationalCityPeople are... 






%/ Career-Minded V Friendly . 

• Customer-Focused • Professional 

• Sales Oriented %/ Enthusiastic 



Sound like you? 

Al National Gty, everyone who comes fnto one of our locations is treated with genuine 
warmth, respect and consideration, whether they arc a customer or an employee. We 
have the following opportunities available: 



• Consumer Banker 

• Service Supervisors 



• Branch Managers 

• Service Technicians 

• Administrative Executive 

• Branch Customer Sales/Service Representatives (Tellers) 

If you possess the NatlonatGtyPeople qualities and arc interested in working for 
one of the nation's largest financial institutions stop by any of our locations, or send 
your resume, indicating position of interest to: National City, Attn: Human 
Resources, One Dearborn Square, Kankakee, IL 60901; fax: (815) 935-3767. 

Wb an proud to be an ElOfAA employer 
KVf/O/V. In support of our commitment to a 
drug free work environment. National Oty 
may conduct pre-employment drug resting. 



National City 

FOLLOW YOUR OWN LEAD* 



www.national-city.com 




Call Paula 

today 

to help you 

place 

your ad 

847-223-8161 



ff-ti y<»jf «.t*»* '! « * 



General Otfiea 



m 



The College off 
Lake County 

Employment Opportunities 



• Child Cart Attendant/Days (pt) ■ Groytloko 

• Child Cars Fod&af or • lolceshorv 

• Operation j Technicians 

• User Support Technician 

• Evenings & Weekend Coordinator [pi] • Sourhlake 

• Coordinator for Student Support Services 

• Fodtity Supervisor -Southlake 

• derk/Evening (pt), EMPS Division 

• Executive Secretory, Student Development 
, * Executive Secretary, Administrative Affairs 

• Switchboard Operator 

• Network Engineer 

• Network Analyst 

• KVAC Mechanic 

• Adult Education Testing Specialist 

• Custodian 3rd Shift 

• Student Senate Bookkeeper (pt) 

• Student Population Retention Specialist 

; f Student Development 5pedatisl 

We offer a competitive salary and excellent benefits: Paid 
vacations, holidays, personal days, ski leave, pension, flex- 
ible work schedule arid summer hours. Paid life and 
medical insurance for fulMime employees ore also offered. 

Application* will be accepted Monday thrv Friday from 
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Human Resources 

19351 W. Washington Street 

Grayslalce, II 60030-1 198 

647-543-2065 • Fax: 847-223-0824 

http://www.de.cc.tUi/ 



Libertvville 



Now Hiring! SUfJSET 

DELI COOKS FOODS 

Excellent opportunity'! 
FuJI and Pan Time. 

Will train. 

Wc offer an excellent benefits package including 
Medical, Dental. Life Insurance, i01(k) and 
Employer Sponsored Retirement Plan. 

For information call: (847) 573-9570 
LibertvvMe 

Allen Pcrin, Store Manager or Ron Wyatt, 
Assistant Store Manager ' 




School Bus Driver 



We have, a friendly 
working environment! 

Wages ranging from $12.78 - $17.11, 

guaranteed five hours per day. 

Excellent benefit package. 

Year 2000 "Bluebird" Transit style buses. 

CDL license and Illinois 

bus permit preferred. 

Come loin the Warren Blue Devil Team! 

Contact Tina M. Delabre 
Director of Transportation 
Warren Township 
High School #121 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



AD&nraSTBAlTVE 
ASSISTrWT 

Local business seeking 

detail oriented, 
multi-tasked individual 
to work reception area 

and support staff. 

Windows exp, required. 

Pleasant atmosphere and 

excellent benefits. Apply 

in person or please send 

resume to American 

Marketing Services 

Attn:Jalmec, 

955 Campus Dr. 

Mundelein, IL 60060 



g BBBfiBnjBC I 



oat 



*■**■* Hotel *«**■* 

EMBASSY SUITES 

A good place to stay, 
a GREAT place to work! 

■ HOUSEKEEPER 

■ A A4. BREAKFAST 
ATTENDANT 

■ P.M, LAUNDRY 
ATTENDANT 

■ FRONT DESK CLERK 

Embassy Suites 

1445 Lake Cook Rd 

Decrfietd.IL G00 15 

ph: 847-945-4500X575 

Must be abte to provide 
vaW worv authorization. 



Amoco 

Let Us Help You with your College Educadoo.We are looking 

for responsible people to provide friendly customer service 

at several retail stations in the area. 

In addition to tuition assistance, Amoco offers: 

Healthcare Benefits, Strong Benefit Package 

Competitive Wages, Flexible Scheduling 

Advancement Opportunities 

1275 & 83, Grayslake 

548-9281 



a uuuumjuuwuwuuu BBBQaagaoo H ga auucauuiJUuj c 
The Lake County High Schools Technology i 
Campus has TEACHER'S AIDES positions open " 
in the following program areas: Industrial 
Electrical Systems (F-T) & Graphic 
Communications (F-T). Applicants must have a 
minimum of 30 semester hours of college credit 
land related work experience. Fax resume/creden- 
tials to Jeff Brierton, Technology Campus 
(847)223-7363 






ACCOUNTANT/BOOKKEEPER 

Excellent opportunity 
w/growing Gurnee firm 

Seeking dedicated individual for challenging position In a 
busy, but pleasant atmosphere. Must be PC proficient 
w/knervdedge or Excel, GA, financial reports, account 
reconciliation, month end close. MJn. 3 yrs related exp. 
w/cxcdlcnt communication & organizational skills. Please fax 
resume and salary reqts. to >1 at 847/855-159 1 or 
[e-mail to vbudcr@geoirackxom 



' 



t Retail 



1 STORE MANAGERS & 
ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

"f l*""-" Junctxm, a dot uxl 
euttiag rrtulcr »nh ottr 15,000 

■ -square fm of tncmshle nines, 

b MTiUng iktce n urupT and 
■ssbtut ntutapr candidate* to 
nprrjir our newel store 
aprninrs. *htdi »iD (x- Vicini ■ 
in * juLrjcm/Nurtb Qiici$n 
mrtni *m. Our present jnmth 
rate and brorr (fan eiperted 
sain « Jumc ttnc cminl 

■ _ hnmokac npcninp for 
lunjVoa, experienced store 
nanafjers. 



1 



Qualified camikUrs should 
^. pusses* 1-3 ]tan \i retail store 

mprt experience »*h either a 
| tud^mand rrf grocerc. variety, 

druR, discount at mm 

mrrvtemdw. Our orpniutkM 
y*offm ntmpciunr %*\m, bomts 

ind Jn t-wifuiauJ hcoc&I 
^pactocc. Irnrrsicd tvidJdjics 

tkom «nd ibdr rruunc m: 
Hllttnun Rnoorcn/SMJG 

DuiLirJunctJaa 

8999WmcrSlrrrt 
t-ttvrrCrow,IL6rit7J • 

Fiu TOH.SH5-O50O EOEHT/U 
»v*.rtfTivipnxJu<tia*n 



Education 

Brighl llon/on* m Moiorob 

Liberty illf Is SeddQK Evtr 

Childhood Teachers to Vork 

Willi |a£an ts. Toddlers 

and Twos! 

Then are plenty of child 

care tenter* out there, but 

none cam match onr 

commitment to mumIUj/ 

»r seek rncrpiic nuhugasbc 
jndhiduals to tork in our 
beautiful, NAEVC accrcdilrd, child- 
cenlcrrd dassrooTm! Join our 
team of profastoaab 
dcdicaJni 10 hripint chtldrrn 
pov in nny *-i>1 Vr stthv to 
create a posithr cmironmrDi for 
children, and (or \wi In 
our utirk^iie cerritr, wwH enjoy 
outstanding support, training and 
advancement opportunties. plus 
have access to ibe .Motorola 
Health dub! We offer excellent 
benefits, tuition mrnbuneinent, 
meikal, denial, -to tOt). vacation, 
sick nay and more! All truant, 
tooU'cry and pfrschool rxjvoon> 
milabie at our new cmier at 
CDV Computer Centers be in 
Vernon lluk Call our 24-hour job 
line at (888)548-2991 eu. l« I 
or 6u resume lo (630)221-1293. 
E0E 



BANKING 
LOAN OFFICER 

I Principal ResidenUal Mortgage, a subsidiaiy of the principal 
Financial Group, a Fortune 500 company, b seeking an 
I experienced loan officer for the Lake Count)- Area. We can 
I provide you nilh the fotloning: 
I- In house processing, undnwriling and dosing 

- 1 0-day dosing for Conventional and FIIA 

- 24-hour approvals 

• laptop products 

• Full Line of products 
■ Advertising Budget 

•Excellent commission structure with full beneUts 

Please call of fax resume to Branch Manager 
847-818-SS00xl6/847-818-g695 EOE 



Executive Director, 
Creat Lakes Auxiliary 

The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society U seeking an experienced senior 

level manager to direct operations of Its Great lakes Auxiliary 

r»nitiifaiii must have the ability to recruit, rnotivate and work with 

volunteers, and have a commitment to human service needs. Essential 

qualifications iocJutle: unlergraduate degree (masters preferred), 

proven leadership, management capability; interpersonal skills, 

superior communication skills; minimum two yean supervisory 

aperience, and familiarity with business software r^rograms. Desirable 

qualities: In-depth knowledge rfmilitary structure and pay/allowance 

systems. Starling salary upper 30's with aceUenl benefits. Send your 

* resumes loNMCRS, 801 N. Randolph a, Ste. 1228, Arlington 

ft 22203 or fax to (703) 696-0 H4 by October IS. 1999. EOE 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



fi a HID CARE TEACHER 

•Fufl-tirrieTart-tinre 

•Monday-Friday 

• Excellent Pay 

We offer an innovative 

schoolwitfi 

] dotdopmental approach. 

Please call 

847-356-2288 



riQdacifciftSijwnMi 

Warehouse Picker 
$7.75/Hour Start 

AtbcrJpts,! nedkatfott Atroj^e* 
neM coajnm, b Metal, a 
drpewJi!*. dciul-orleiud mi- 
vkkat to Jcmntelr stock and pkk 
rrpado^dmrJtafiM torcas- 
loaen crden. buvtedgt of oxn- 
prters 1 pks, but irfl trta. fuIJ- 
btae posDM, ndubr sha. but 
Khetkilrtif DrubUflT required *r 
otter m tuxOet work emlroo- 

m and beadhs. rVase naUfn 
res«m« or ipph in pervxi 
Allscrlpts, Inc. 

Alia: lift 

itoirn— nuDr, 

Lhcm arJL_ftKMM *(rt 

E nit hrthSnTicaxnni 

0fVtiri]Bj ftrr Vorij^ticr 



LUBE TECH 

Wanted 
Full Time 

Driver's license 

required. Mechanical 

experience helpful. 

Apply in person. 

Oil X-Change 

207 W.Rollins 
Round Lake Beach 



SUPEfflOR 
OPPORIUNmES 

Sr..yminianmeAss't...J3SK 

Admioistratrvc Asst . .$32K 

Outsides Sales... $25K phis 

Cuaomer Service... J24K 

Receptioa...^22K 

DataEau7...$20K 

SUPEUM PERSONNEL 

244-0016 549-0016 

Gurnee Vernon Hills 



Growing Tag and tabd Mfr. 

Seeking PRESS and 

MAQIINE OPERATORS 

Competitive Pay Rates/Ml 

Benefits. Brand New 

Pbiit/F adbties Exp. or 

Trainees. 

CallChrisat 

847-562-5100 

Chic^oTag 

and Label Inc. 

Ubertyville, tt 



ENTRY LEVEL 
REPORTER 

Lakeland Newspapers is 
looking for someone with 
a passion for journalism. 
This full-time entry level 
reporter position will give 

the right candidate a 

chance to get his or her 

foot in the door as a local 

community journalist, 

covering the full gamut of 

stories that happen 

weekly in Lake County ! 

villages. 

Please send or FAX 

resume with cover 

letter to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Robert Warde 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, Illinois 

60030 

fr FAX: (847)223-8810 gj 



. 



. 



/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



October 1, 1999 



-./ 






220 



I Itlp Wanted 
Full-Time 






SPEECH/ 

LANGUAGE J 

'! PATHOLOGISTS j ) 
-! for Beach Park School ! ^ 
* J District 3. Must hove | •< 
5 1 Master's. Contact j S 
J j Aslrid Martindaio at j J 

!i_ _599-5355_ j5 



SPRING MAKER 

Immcd Opening. 
Loii^-slantling spring co. 
seeks cxp'd setup person 
w/shinko eqpmt exp. Top 

wages & all fringes. 
Toll Tree 800-424-1526; 

Resume: (lilco Inc, 

1 6000 Common ltd. 

Roseville, MI 48066 V 



HAIRSTYLISTS/ 
BARBERS 

New Snip N Clip 

Family Haircut Shop 

Opening Soon 

Now taking applications for: 
FT Manager & 
FT/IT Stylists 

Sign-on bonus, hourly pay, 
bonuses, commissions, paid 
vacations, paid birthday & 
great tips. 

GdBlary at 847-669-2655 

or Fcrral at 

I-800-622-68O-1 



^ Cosmetology^ 

iNSTOUCTOtt 

needed for instruction o( 

students in adult continuing 

education Cosmetology pro- 

Rram.CEveninEs) 4;30p.m.- 

10:00 p.m. & Twenty 

Saturday, 8;00 am- l:00p.oi. 

Cosrtit'tology license reijuired 

For more 

information cadi 

Minerva Ifogan, (847)22.1- 

6681, est 7263 or fax resume 

lo Technology Campus, 

W7)22V7tM r% 



OFFICE 



| Full time positions! 
Flexible hours 
Vacation and 
benefits. 
S8-$15/HR 
Wauconda 
Call (847) 487-7000 
or fax resume to: 
(847) 487-7003 



5"' Receptionist/ 

V Admlniitrative 
^ Aisiitant 

\ Local window distributor 

S seeking energetic Individual 
to join our sufT. 
Responsible for answering 
pi tones, ^reeling customers, 
assisting managers and a 
variety or oilier duties. 
Should have computer 
knowledge. We offer an 
excellent benefits package 
in a friendly, learn oriented 
environment. Please send 
, resume to: 

Loewen Windows 

1 2 28 American Way, Suite 100 

Ubertyrille, JL 600-18 

EOE 



Movers/ Drivers 

Are you hardworking 

and dependable? 

Then we're looking for 

you! Local Moving 

company is seeking 

motivated customer service 

oriented movers and 
drivers. Competitive wages 
plus tips and bonuses and 

great opportunities for 

advancement. Contact us at 

(847)549-7400 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Dri ver$-©wn er 
Operators 

Immcd Openings. Chgo 

area truck company 

needs Owner Ops to 

operate E. Rockies. 

Great pay, new trailers, 

max miles. Small fleet 

owner welcome. 
888-782-5400 x207 



RECEPTIONIST/ 
CASHIER 

Looking for a 

dependable, 

outgoing team 

player. General 

office duties with 

benefits package. 

Apply at: 

Acura of Llbertyvlllo 

1620 S. Mllwaukoo 

(847) 680-7333 



Pharmacy 
Technician 
F/T $8.25/1ir 

«j^ Allu npu. Inc., a metlimliHi 
r^nunjKi-mn)l mrtipjm Is Mvklnt 
3>>an CfitTErtic, dttul orlrmal anif 
Jlfl depend j tile Indnhliul in mirk 
«|lh(-iljv vtwfl n-pxkmfc plumu- 
jJ^ccullcaU. Auembty/pnidurtiDfl 
3^r)perimcra plus,' but will iratn. 

•J^Vr itfcr an itciilent eimifK-nsj. 
jZ^iiun/hcm-tii pjckiRr, lixluitlnR 
1 till (k). plow send resume lir 



S' 



£AllscripLs Inc. 
.Mm IIP. 
J f II tjnnwnr l>mr UhrfMlUr. II 
(JiMM-tM 

J^™ I in jjI !i/U jHh (irt 1 1 1 «n 

MP Pai M-(Js«P "'■US 

fc_ llUtlmt ltiT»i.iV|.b.r 




Business 
Opportunities 



ARE YOU TIRED OF THE 

RAT RACE? 

Are you tired ot your Job? 

Aro you tired ot being Broke? 

Aro you tired ot being Tired? 

We have a solution! 

Call loll free at 

1-877-887-4)97 

(pro-recorded message, 

Call anytime). 

INTERNATIONAL 

NEW YORK 

STOCK EXCHANGE 

COMPANY 

Looking tor Independent 

Representatives. 

No experience necessary. 

win train. 

(BOO) 897-4910 

Code: RR. 



MAKE BIG MONEY, from 
6/1/99 TO 8/1/99 a $5,000 in- 
vestment in tho Japanese yen 
returned as much as $56,250. 
Call t-800-380-3104 Windsor 
Ltd. For your tree investment 
kit Risk Capital only. Minimum 
investment $3,000. 



RETIRED EARLY AND 

NOT LJVING THE 

LIFESTYLE YOU 

HOPED FOR? 

Call me and allow me to 

explain what I have been 

doing. Serious Inquiries Only 

Call Monday- Friday 

(847) 872-3580. 



TIRED OF WORKING 
FOR SOMEONE ELSE? 

Home-based business 
Public Utility Industry. 
Call 1-888-548-6873. 



WORK FROM HOME1 
Growing communications 
company seeking outgoing 
representatives. Earn up to 
$3k per month . Full time posi- 
tion available. Flexible hours, 
can work trom home. Call 800- 
891-3849 or www.oxcellr.com/ 
kwfox. (corrected phono *). 



250 


School/Instruction 



PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now tor students 

6yrs. to adult. 

Over 25yrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780. 

PIANO/KEYBOARD 

LESSONS. 

Your home or mine. 

(847) 816-7031. 



301 


i Antiques 



MOONSTONE DISH- 

WARE, SERVICE for 8, with 
many additional pieces, 
$1,325. (847) 680-9697, 
(847) 740-3646. 



304 


Appliances 



RANGE JENN-AIR GAS 

combination; grill, self cloanlng 
electric ovon. Excellent condi- 
tion. 4yrs. old. Duct work In- 
cluded. Black. $1,500 now, 
asking $500. (847) 625-2111 
8am- 4pm, (414) 942-0358 
4pm-8pm. 



310 


Bazaars/Crafts 


BEANIE BABY SHOW 
Sunday, October 3rd., 

10am-4pm. 

Gurnoo Hampton Inn, 

(Corner of Dilleys & Grand, 

across from McDonalds). 


314 


Building Materials 



HURRICANE RECOVERYI 
ARCH stoet buildings. With- 
stand winds to 150+mph. Ask 
for special disaster relief pric- 
ing on garages and storage. 
Financing available. Call lm< 
mediately t -800-34 1-7007. 

STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14, $8,582. 50x75x14, 
$11,831. 50x100x16, 
$15,391. 60x100x16, $17,170. 
Mini-storage buildings, 
40x160, 32 units, $16,534. 
Freo brochures, www.sontinel- 
bulldlngs.com, Sontlnol Build- 
ings, 800-327-0790. Exton- 
slon 79, _■ 

USED GARAGE DOORS: 
10x11 Wayne Dalton Metal 
with Rog and low clearance 
hardware (used 1yr.), $500. 
10x10 wood panel door, $250. 
8'6*x9 roll up metal door, 
$1 50. Used metat barn siding, 
36 pieces, 30*x16ft. (approx- 
imately 40sq.ft. oach or 
I440sq.rt. total) $12.00 each 
or $400.00 all. One 5- 
1/2'x16ft. wood pole, $20.00 
Evenings (847) 395-6311. 



318 



Business 
Office ruiulpmenl 



COPIER: MINOLTA 40 
CPM, feeder, sortor, duplex. 
only 3,000 copies. Cost $12K, 
sell $1,875. Closed business. 
Can deliver. (815) 558-0335. 

COPIERS/FAXES. 

Din cheap! 

Working copiers and fax 

machlnos. 

Starting at $100. 

DOES YOUR CURRENT 

COPIER NEED SERVICE? 

(414) 652-9183 

leave message. 

ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER, 
SMITH Corona, lyr. old, per- 
fect condition. Call tor inlorma- 
lion (847) 356-1 148. 

INCREASE YOUR SALES 
30%-100%. TAKE OVER 
LEASE ON PROCESSING 
EQUIPMENT FOR CRED- 
IT CARD SALES. CALL 
CARL (847) 392-4215. 



320 



KJcctronlcs 
Computers 



324 



Farm Guide 



330 



Garage 
Rumm.igc Sale 



ESTATE SALE FURNI- 
TURE, lawn and garden 
tools, glassware, kitchonwaro, 
housewares, tools, too much 
to list. Saturday 4 Sunday, Oc- 
tober 2nd & 3rd,, 9am-5pm. 
No oorly birds. 1517 North 
Ave., Round Lake Boach ( 2 
blocks South ol Rollins and 
North Ave). 

GARAGE SALE BABY ond 
toddler clothing, and othor 
baby Horns (swing, oxorsauc- 
or, etc.). Saturday, October 
2nd., Bam-2pm., Marlnors 
Covo, 312 Seafarer Dr., 
Grayslako. 

GARAGE SALE SATUR- 
DAY October 9th, 8am- 
12noon. rain or shine, 972 Ty- 
lonon, Grayslako (Chesa- 
pea ke Farms Subdivision). 

GARAGE/HOME FUR- 

NISHINGS SALE, Friday 
10/1, 10am-3pm. Saturday 
10/2, 9am-3pm. 168 S. Osago 
Ct., Round Lake (Bright Mead- 
ows Subdivision, oft of Cedar 
Lake & 120). Girls toddlor 
clothes, lamps, tables, din- 
netto, Curio cablnot, and 
more. ' 

HUGE MOVING SALE 
SATURDAY & SUNDAY, 

9AM-4PM, 

OCTOBER 2ND & 3RD., 

37924 N. WATTS, 

SPRING GROVE, 

( RT. 12 N. 1 BLOCK 

BEFORE STATE PARK 

RD. EAST SIDE OF 

STREET TURN OFF ON 

LAKE VISTA TERRACE, ). 

Antiques, rugs, lawn mowers, 

mink stole, wedding dress, 

almond top stove vont and 

light, golf clubs, work out 

equipment, clothing, adult & 

chlldrens, lamps, tools, 

kitchen supplies, household 

items, crafts, knick knacks, 

fumiluro, toys, glider, summer 

toys, and much more. 

UBERTYVILLE SALE ES- 
TATE/MOVING.Fumlture. 
antiques, skis, girls clothes, 
collectibles, Porogo Double 
stroller, toys. Soptomber 30th, 
October 1st., 9am-3pm, 726 
Paradise, ( 1 mile West ot Mil- 
waukeo and Lake Street). 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIO SALE, and there 
Is still things that just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run it 
under the "FREE or Givea- 
ways* classified column. FREE 
ADS aro NO CHARGEI 
(847) 223-8181.0xt. 140, 



338 



Horses & Tacks 



BROTHER COLOR MULTI- 
FUNCTION PRINTER, fax, 
etc.. 7 functions. 6/wooks old, 
groat deal, $200. Jim (847) 
433-6544 coachuxo@aol.com 



COMPUTER SALE COM- 
PLETE systems, $100-$700. 
For more info, call (847) 
662-5318. 



GATEWAY COMPUTERS 
NEW FACTORY DIRECT $0 
MONEY DOWN. SOME CRED- 
IT PROBLEMS OKAY. PENTI- 
UM III 500 - LOW MONTHLY 
PAYMENTS. ASK ABOUT 
WAIVING FIRST PAYMENT. 
CALL OMC 1-800-477-9016. 



STILL PAYING FOR IN- 
TERNET ACCESS? Web- 
combo Amorlcas freo Internet 
access provider. Pay one time 
registration of $179.95. Re- 
ceive lifetime Internet access. 
No more payments over 
www.getcombo.com 
1-888-243-8888 (SCA Not- 
work). 



16YR. GRADE TENN. 
WALKER MARE, 15.1H. rod 
bay, groat looks, good gait. 
Used as brood mare. Intmod. 
ridor req. $1,200/bost. (847) 
356-3098 attor 6pm. 

MORAB/TB FILLY 1998. 
Gruilla with a star. Should ma- 
ture around 16 H.H. Very alh- 
leticl Will do well in any sport. 
Imprinted P.H.R.. $2,000. 
(414)767-1084 



OUTSTANDING FULL 
SERVICE FACILITY, huge in- 
door arena, healed barn, less- 
ons, horses lor sate. (414) 
857-6860. .__ 

SADDLE SHOP HORSE 
trailers, Western/English, 
now/used. Buy, soil, trado. The 
Corral. Sullivan, Wisconsin. 
(414)593-8048. 



340 



Household Goods 

furniture 



PEACOCK CHICKS AND 
GUINEA CHICKS. (414) 
425-8112. 



BUNK BED, full bottom, twin 
top, black meial frame, lad- 
der/railings, Iree full size mat- 
tress. $150/best. (847) 
838-3421. 

Glati/Braai Cocktail 

Table, $150. 

Perfect condition, 

(647) 548-9858. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCEI 

Sofa/lovesoat set, 

hunter green, $495. 

Sofa, while, $350, 

Sofa/lovosoat. 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathers and More, 

Dining room sets, 10- place: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sots, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

www.modolhomefumituro.com 



340 



Household 
Goods/ Furniture 



DINING AND DINETTE 
SETS, assorted dosks and as- 
sorted light fixiuros, grandfa- 
ther clock, armoiros and as- 
sorlod couchos with lovo- 
seats. By owner. (647) 
438-6997. 

DININGROOM SET DREX- 
EL Heritage French Provin- 
cial, table, 2-toavos with pads, 
buffet, 2-ploco China Cabinet, 
6-chaIrs, $1,500. (847) 
662-3625 a ft or 5pm, 

DININGROOM SET WITH 
6 cane bock chairs, oval table 
with throo leaves, china cabi- 
net, $250/bosl. Oak executive 
desk. $50. (647) 838-0287. 

ELEVEN PIECE THOMAS- 
VILLE DININGROOM SET. 
great shape. $1,075/bosl. 
(647) 599-9089, 

HOME OFFICE FURNI- 
TURE L-shaped dosk, with 
file cabinet drawer, large 
hutch with light, nice chair, 
G/monlhs old, $400. Gary 
(847) 546-2636. 



QUEEN SIZE BRASS 
HEADBOARD. 3-pieco childs 
bedroom set, desk, dresser 
and twin headboard. (B47) 
816-0522 



SLEEPER SOFA, $250. 
Loveseat. $250. Daybed with 
new mattress. $150. (414) 
552-7696. 



SUPER WHOLESALE 

PRICES 

NEW NAME BRAND 

FURN. 

'Deluxe- apiece sofa, love, 

chair, $159. 

*3 -piece 100% Italian 

Leather sofa/kjveseat and 

chair, $1,290. 

'Italian lacquer bedroom set, 

$790. 
* Italian mahogany bedroom 

tot $990. 

'Queen pillow top mattress 

set. $200. 

* King size mattress set. 

deluxe, $350. 
•7- piece cherry dininiroom 

set, $490. 
'Benchcrafi Italian leather 

sectional, $1,495. 

•Italian leather sofa steeper, 

$595. 

'Bone peartized leather 

sectional, $1,895. 

'Italian Imported lOpiece 

mahogany diningroom set, 

was $4,500, now $1,995. 

* Italian marble diningroom 

set, with chairs. $1,295. 

FACTORY CLOSE OUTS: 

Twin size mattress sot, 

$69.95. 

'Full size $79.95. 

'Queen size $99.95. 

'Butcher block diningroom set 

$75. 

'Black metal futon with 

martross, $150. 

*3-pioce cocktail table sot. 

$49. 
•3-pioce mirror picture set, 

$10. 
'Queen Anne design cherry 

desk, $125. 

Imported rugs, art. statues, 

and much more. 

WHOLESALE TO YOU 

BEST PRICES 

SHELDON CORD 

PRODUCTS 

2201 W. Devon, Chicago. 

Open 7 days 

(773) 973-7070. 



THREE NEW WOOD 
DOORS B0'x29\ Aluminum 
fluorescent lights. Best offers. 
Aluminum Lounge, $5.00. with 
pad $7.00. (847) 566-0990. 

WOOD STOVE, ENGLAN- 
OER, like now, glass doors, 
blower. 83% efficient, $500. 
Ron (847) 526-3290. 




'Pulverized Top Soil', 
sand, gravel, holders, mulch, 
wood chips, Bobcat service, 
power washing, snowpfowing. 
Delivery wlhln 24 hours, Call 
(647)244-4125 

41 7D JACOBSEN TURF 
Cat mower, 60' deck, 52' 
snow-blower, resident use 
only, 550hrs., well maintained, 
(414) 681-1579 after 5pm, 

MAXUM ROTOTILLER, 

CHAIN drive, 5hp, used once, 
$225/bost. (847) 546-6870 

evenings. 

USED LAWN MOWERS, 

Starting at $40. (847) 740- 
2415. 



350 



Miscellaneous 



350 


Miscellaneous 



1/4 SCALE RC OFF ROAD 
STADIUM TRUCK, 55cc 2 
stroke Inflatable tiros, 16ln- 
Hx20inWx42lnL. Very fast. 
Call for inlo (847) 338-8843. 

18' DIRECTTV SATEL- 
LITE SYSTEMS. Slnglo 
$69.00. Two box systems 
$199.00. 3 months free pro- 
gramming. Froo Install kit with 
purchase. Authorized dealer. 
Opon 7 days. 1-800-325-7B36 
0001 11, (SCA Notwork). 

BEANIE BABIES 

Paying Top-Top Caah 

For your retired •, 

Calf Superalte 

(414) 697-7923 

Kenosha. Wl. 

BEANIE/COLLECTIBLE 
DISPLAY CASES. Variety of 
sizes, stylos, options. Floor, 
wall, tablo. travel models. Cat- 
alog $2.00, refundable 
with/purchase. Visa, Master- 
card. (414) 857-2915. P. 0. 
Box 253, Somors, Wise. 53171. 

FISH FOR STOCKING: 
Walleye, Large Mouth Bass, 
Hybrid Blue Gill, Black Crap- 
pto, Yellow Perch, Minnows 
and more. Brookcrost Fisher- 
ies. Ltd. W3698 County High- 
way G, Cedar Grove, Wiscon- 
Sin. 53013. (920) 668-6385. 

JUKE BOX AMI 1966. model 
R90, with records, plays 45's, 
good condition, $500. (847) 
526-6814. 

MOTIVATIONAL CAS- 
SETTES, excellent condition. 
Over $500 value. Best offer. 
(847) 516-3425. 

POKEMON FOUR COM- 
PLETE card sets with alt 
Hoio's. Mint. Unlimited Ser- 
ies Seta Basic (Chartzardl), 
$390. Jungle. $365. Out of 
Print 1st. Ed. Seta. Basic 
(Chartzardl) offer. Jungle, 
$425. (847) 546-6952, (847) 
546-6953. 

SEARS FREEZER, 1YR. 
old, $285. Dishwasher, $45. 2- 
llres, P23575R15, $30/ea. 
Sears Riding mower, $375. 
Lawn shredder. $50. (414) 
551-6034. 

SNOW PLOW SNOWWAY 

International complete with 
lights, . ..used once, 

$2,000/best (414) 686-1764. 



STEEL ELECTRICAL 
LIGHTING POLES. 20ft., 
30ft. & 50fL long. For Informa- 
tion (847) 742-5SS6. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEt Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE cokx cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



MEDICARE RECIPIENTS 
USING a NEBULIZER MA- 
CHINEI STOP paying full price 
for Albutorol, Alrovont. etc. so- 
lutions. MEDICARE will pay for 
them. We bill Medicare for you 
and ship diroctly to your door. 
MED-A-SAVE 1-800-538- 
9849 exL 17J. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 



BEAUTIFUL YELLOW LAB 

PUPPIES, with Champion 
bloodlines. Both parents on 
premises. $300-$350. (414) 
249-79B7. 

BELGIAN MAUNOIS PUP* 
PIES, females. 10/weeks old, 
AKC registered, $500-$550. 
Holon (920) 634-2433. .». 

BOXER PUPPIES 4-FE- 
MALES, i-malo, available 
October 6th„ $500. (847) 
688-9574. 



BRITTANY AKC, GREAT 
hunter or family dog. 
orange/liver, $400, (414) 
78t-1974. 

CFA BLACK MALE DOLL 
FACE PERSIAN KITTEN, 
14/wooks old, parents on 
premises, $200. (847) 
223-2514. 



CHOW PUPPIES ADOR- 
ABLE AKC registered. Must 
see, ready to go. (414) 
697-1948 aftof 4pm. 

DOG SITTING 

IN MY HOME. 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (847) 966-6319. 




CALLING ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOM'SIII Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Care 
Network is looking for nurtur- 
ing, responsible, creative indi- 
viduals who would like to start 
their own business while stay- 
ing at homo with their children. 
If you Irvo in Lake of McHenry 
County and would liko assis- 
tance in getting licensed, on- 
going technical assistance, 
and child referrals this pro- 
gram is for you. For more infor- 
mation on how to become a 
quality infant and loddlor day 
caro provider In your homo 
call Dona Thompson at (847) 
356-1021. 

CHILD CARE NEEDED for 

8/month old, 2 days/week, 
Grayslako area. No more than 
4 children. Certified. (847) 543- 
4455. 

DONT SETTLE FOR 

LESS I 

At Punk/a Playground wo 

cater lo your 0-6yr. old with 

lots ol love and structured 

activities. If you expect the 

best, call me anytimo Eileen 

(847) 740-3952. 

FULL-TIME OPENINGS IN 
Stale Licensed Home Pre- 
school. Warm environment, 
reasonable, meals provided, 
full curriculum, 7am-6pm, re- 
ferrals. Early Achievor Linden- 
hurst (647) 265-0067. 



LOVING MOTHER OF 1 

has lutl-lime openings in her 
Mundeletn home, meats and 
snacks provided, reasonable 
rates. II Inierastod call Kristine 
(847) 837-8324. ; 

LOVING MOTHER OF 1, 
has 2 full-lime openings in my 
Ingteslde home. Monday- Fri- 
day. Meals and snacka includ- 
ed. Very reasonbJe rales. For 
more Information please con- 
tact Lisa (847) 587-0667. 



MIDDLE AGED MOTHER 
with 24yrs., experience has 
openings in her Round Lake 
Beach home. Large fenced 
yard, meals and snacks In- 
cluded, reasonable rates. Ref- 
erences upon request Ploase 
contact Diane. Cetl (847) B45- 
4524. 



NANNY NEEDED MON- 
DAY-FRIDAY, lor 5/month 
old and 1 lyr. old. Competitive 
salary. Lake Villa area. Uve-tn 
or live-out Please call (847) 
356-M19. 



SPRING GROVE FAMILY 
looking for a local person to 
babysrt 2 boys, Monday, Wed- 
nesday & Friday afternoon. 
Please call Erinn (815) 
675-3129. 



Childcare 



Live-in Childcare in Batavia, IL 40 miles west 
of Chicago; $16,500/yr. plus free room and 
board. Immediate free medial and disability 
Insurance, paid vacation and sick days. 
Holiday pay, 403(b) and pension pay. Must 
be 21 with minimum H.S. diploma and like to 
work with children. Individuals and couples 
are encouraged to apply. I-&&&-755-2M*). Or 
lax resume to: *3t-*#t-3M2 



tetober /, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C23 



360 



Pet* & Supplies 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 


Homes For Safe 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 


Homes For Sale 



)00 TRAINING-INDIVID- 
JAL DOQ and poppy ctaas- 

i. Dog Su pptj oq. Doja Vue 
Janlne Entorprlsos. (414) 
-7391 Of e-mail. 

3javueh@ix.netcom.com. 

FOUND DOMESTIC BUN- 
f, on tho border of Island 
»ke and Wauconda. Ploase 
ill 10 Identify. (847) 

187-2909. 

[GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

[AKC PUPS, shots, wormed, 
[ $350$450. (920) 825-7*87. 

(PERSIAN HIMALAYAN 

KITTENS, CFA registered, 

flit ihoti, 2- males, with blue 

[eyes, 1-famale, with gold 

eyes, $350. (847) 546-2934. 

THREE YEAR OLD BLUE 
AND GOLD MACAW, with 
cage, $700/besL 1YR. OLD 
BLUE FRONTED AMA- 
ZON, with cage, $600/bost. 
(847)638-0113. 



364 



ResUuranl 
Hfjulpmcni 



CAPPUCCINO MACHINE, 
COMMERCIAL grade. New 
La Spazlaio Selelron fully 
auto, one group with grinder, 
cappuccino and espresso 
cups. $1,500 lifetime guaran- 
too on boiler. (847) 973-9360. 

RESTAURANT EQUIP- 

MENT, GRILL, deep fryers. 
Everything almost new. Too 
much to list. (414) 308-321 1 . 



368 



Tools & 
Machinery 



A1RMIX COMMERCIAL 
SPRAYER) cart mounted. 
Originally $2,000, $385/besl. 
(414)862-9249. 

TEN INCH RADIAL 

CRAFTSMAN SAW with 
base and drawers, in good op- 
erating condition. $250/besi, 
(847)395-8312. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



BUYING RETIRED BEAN- 
IE babies. Please call Mike 
after 7pm weekdays or an day 
weekends (847)918-0337. 

Slot ' Midlines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parti. Also JUKE SOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)965-2742. . 

WANTED TO BUY MO 
acres near liVWfec. border, to 
build storage building. Ask for 
Jarod (4141 662-2517, 



65TH ST. 616, 2 unit, 2-bod- 
rooms each, wtth diningroom. 
No Realtors, $99,500. (414) 
657-6601. 

AFFORDABLE IN GRAYS- 
LAKE Spacious split level du- 
plex, 3-bedf corns, 2-baths, of- 
fice, attached garage. No as- 
sociation foes! Many up- 
grades including; vaulted ceil- 
ings, Morliiat cabinets, re- 
cessed lighting, central air, 
fenced yard, 2-pantries, great 
closota and storage. 
6127,500. By owner (647) 
646-0109. 

ALDEN, ILL 6.14 acres, 
totally remodeled 1,900 sq.ft. 
home, 4- bedrooms, 1-3/4 
baths, firoptace, 2.5 car ga- 
rage, $197,000. (815) 
646-2960. 

ANTJOCH 4-BEDROOM. 4- 

1/2 bath, 240Gsq.fi., 2-car ga- 
rage, 1995. Wooded lot with 
large deck. 10 minutes from I- 
94. less than 2 miles from 
Metra Station. $219,000, 
(647) 638-2320. 
See www.owners.com, 
home ID MBT5437. 

ANTtOCH CUSTOM EXEC- 
UTIVE Brick Ranch, on beau- 
tifully landscaped acre, 4/5 
bedroom, 4-baths, 2-1/2 car 
garage, formal livingroom/di- 
nlngroom, famltyroom with 
brick fireplace, designer kitch- 
en with island, separate eating 
area, lower level wtth second 
kitchen, bath, family room, 
gameroonvbodroom, possibfo 
In-law. $324,900. (647) 
395-1997. 

AVON/GRAYS LAKE 
SCHOOLS 4-BEDROOM 
ranch, Round Lake Beach ad- 
dress. New noors/carpet/roof. 
Finished basement, largo 
deck, $105,000. (815) 
344-1375. 

BEST VALUE IN LAKE 
COUNTY. Round Lake Park 
contemporary, 2- story, 4 ■ bed- 
room, 2.5 baths, 2400sq.fi. 
Must see. Fun finished base- 
ment, biliiardroom, glass block 
wet bar. Basement adds 
another 1 .OOOsq.fl. - 7yrs. 
young. St 75,000. For Solo By 
Owner. (847) 740-4067. 

BURUNQTON TOWN- 
HOUSE 2-UNITS at 
1,850sq.rt, each. 3- bedrooms, 
2.5 baths, 2-car attached ga- 
rages, prrvaie wooded rear 
yard, will sell one or both. 
$112,000/ea. (414) 
763-6365. 

BY OWNER HERON HAR- 
BOR SUBDIVISION, ANTI- 
OCH 4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, C/A, large patio, big 
yard, full basement. $218,000. 
(847) 836-4946. 



BY OWNER LAKE VILLA Im- 
maculate lOyr. old 3-bed- 
room, cedar homo, on 1/2 
acre wooded comer tot. Great 
schools, lakorlflhts, must see. 
$165,000, (847) 587-6011, 
25220 W. Lincoln Dr. 

BY OWNER- LAKE Villa, 3 
bedroom, 2 bath, quad level, 
Bving room, dining room, eat- 
In kitchen, family room, central 
air, fireplace, fenced yard, pa- 
Uo, attached garage, 2.5 car, 
close to Meva. (847) 
356-6628 , 

COZY 2-BEDROOM 

CEDAR sided ranch wtth 2- 
car tandem heated attached 
garage with automatic door, 
updated throughout. move-In 
condition, afl appliances stay, 
excellent neighborhood, moti- 
vated sellers, $93,500. West 
Miltmore Subdivision. 36902 
N. Carol Lrt, Lake visa. (647) 
265-6725. 



DIAMOND LAKE LAKE- 
FRONT 4-bedroom, 2.5 bath 
home. Many special features. 
Four season recreation. 
$389,900. (847) 566-7768. 



DRASTIC REDUCTION 
813 Lexington, Island Lake. 
Totally redone, llgrti and 
bright, new carpet, bath 
doors, 2-docks, 2-slkjers, built 
In book case with sliding lad 
der, shed, fenced' yard 
$138,900. REMAX TRAD) 
TIONS. Randy ' Robinson 
(8 1 5)338^4455. 



DREAMS DO COME 
TRUE! House For Sale By 
Owner. 9210 393rd. Ave., 
Powers Lake, KnoMs. Wiscon- 
sin. Newer raised ranch on 
wooded corner lot Beautifully 
landscaped. 3-bedrooms, 2- 
full baths (1 wtth whirlpool 
tub), famifyroorn with oak man- 
tlo fireplace, laundryroom. 
large oat-ln kitchen with all ap- 
pliances, high efficiency fur- 
nace with central aJr, 2O0amp 
service, " 2-car garage, 
12tt.x12tt. deck off kitchen, 
concrete drive next to house 
for RV/boal Plus 16x32 patio 
bdhind house. 10x14 bam 
shed enclosing 4ft cyclone 
fenced yard. AX this for only 
$160,000. No Brokers Please. 
Can Ray at (414) 279-6397. 



ELK GROVE BY OWNER 5- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, living- 
room, diningfoom, famiiyroom 
with fireplace. $259,900. (647) 
524-2730. 



Dont Wait for 

to Ring 




FOR SALE BY OWNER Fox 
Lake, 2- bedroom, 1-bath 
home, large livlngroom with 
tray- ceiling, laundry/mud 
room, attached 1-1/2 car ga- 
rage, fenced yard, central air, 
lake rights (Pistakee Lake), 
many upgrades. Move-In con- 
dition, $111,500. For appoint - 
ment (647) S87-97t5. 

BY OWNER-ROUND LAKE 
BEACH Ranch style 2-bod- 
room up, 1 -bedroom down. 
Full basement, 1-bath, C/A, 
gas fireplace, 2-car heated ga- 
rage and workshop, other ex- 
tras. Close to school and shop- 
ping. (847) 546-1544. 
$106,900. 

RICHMOND FOUR BED- 
ROOM RANCH, 2-full baths, 
1-1/4 acres, must see. 
$195,900. All newly remo- 
deled. (815) 676-6282. 

FOUR BEDROOM, 2- 
BATH brick ranch on 1+acre. 
Newly remodeled kitchen, 
$184,800. Cad for details after 
6pm weekdays or leave mes- 
sage anytime (647) 
223-6746. 

FOX LAKE 2-BEDROOM 1- 

bath lakefront house, Ihr. 
from Chicago on private is- 
land. Boat access only. Beauti- 
ful view of Meyers Bay, 
$99,900. (815) 363-1449, 
(847) 587-9476. 

FOX LAKE BY OWNER 
New 3/99. Raised ranch, 3- 
bodroom. 2-1/2 bath, 2-1/2 ga- 
rage, sod, deck, woodbuming 
fireplace, A/C, cathedra) ceil- 
ing, $190K/negotiable. (647) 
587-4222. 

GRAYSLAKE - ' 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 baths, finished (amity 
room, fireplace, hardwood 
floors, Berber carpeting. 
Large woodsy lot Walktohig- 
school. Reduced to $154,900. 
Can (647) 543-4023 for ap- 
pointment. 

GRAYSLAKE AREA-IN 

HISTORIC HAINESV1LLE, 
MINUTES TO DOWN- 
TOWN GRAYSLAKE AND 
SHOPPING. ACCLAIMED 
GRAYSLAKE SCHOOLS. 
Beautiful 2-story, 4BO, 2.5BA, 
2068sq.ft. home features a 
itvtngroom, famiryroom, sepa- 
rate di ni n groom. large eat-in 
kitchen with lots of oak cabi- 
nets, 1st floor utHityroom, par- 
tlafly finished basement, 2-car 
garage, fenced yard backs to 
nature area. Safe, quiet neigh- 
borhood. $199,700. For 
appointment or Informs- 
tion call (647) 546-6363. 

GRAYSLAKE HERITAGE 
AREA, comer lot, 4-bedroom, 
2-1/2 bath colonial raised 
ranch, oak floors/trim/chair 
rail, famiiyroom with fireplace, 
large kitchen, all appliances In- 
cluded, 2-1/2 car garage, wtth 
separate furnace. Walk to 
1 rain/d ownlo wn/schools/park, 
Hyrs. Old, $264,900. (847) 
223-2755. 




...with an ad in 
Lakeland Newspapers 

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opportunities. 

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CALL YOUR CLASSIFIED REPRESENTATIVE 1-847-223-8161 



QURNEE 2-STORY 
brick and stucco. 2-car at- 
tached garage, 5-bedrooms, 
4-baths, famifyroom, formal di- 
ningroom, oak staircase and 
trim, 2 masonry fireplaces, 
laundryroom. full basement. 
Very attractive home in nice lo- 
cation, $335,000. (847) 
623-2870. 

QURNEE 3-BEDROOM, 1- 

1/2 bath ranch, central air, up- 
dates Include: new water heat- 
er, roof, vinyl siding. Berber 
carpet, tile floors, new paint, 
all while appliances will stay, 
60x160ft. tree lined yard, 1* 
1/2 car garage. Realtors wel- 
come at 3%. $128,500. (847) 
265-9002. 

QURNEE FSBO, 

$152,500, 3-bodrooms. 1- 
1/2 baths, fenced back yard, 
will pay your moving expens- 
es. Details call (847) 

973-1193. 

QURNEE Adorable 1/2 acre 
wooded, mature perennials, 
low taxes, 3-bodrooms, 2- 
baths, 2-1/2 detached garage, 
$174.750. (847) 244-3422. 

QURNEE UPDATED THI- 
LEVEL, walk to schools, Dis- 
trict 56. New floors, deck, C/A 
fenced yard, $165,000. (847) 

263-3036. 

HOME FOR SALE On beau- 
tiful double lot, in West Milt- 
more neighborhood. 3-bed- 
room, 1 -newly remodeled 
bath, hardwood floors, de- 
tached 2. 5 -car garage, on 
quiet no thru street $127,000. 
For more details call (847) 
356-0377. House shown by 
appointment only. 



HOUSE FOR SALE 3-bod- 
room, 2-story, full basement, 
new 2-1/2 car attached ga- 
rage on 2 lots, furnace, and 
C/A lyr. old, 2yr. old siding, 
new deck. $110,000. (414) 
878-9709. 

JOHNSBURO LEASE/OP- 
TION, SPACIOU8 3-bed- 
room, 2-baih, huge kitchen, 
.walk-out LL, fireplace, 2-1/2 
car, large beautiful lot, great 
location, $l,250/month. (847) 
438-9059. 

JUST REDUCED QAQE3 

Lake For Sale by owner. Lak- 
orlghia, 3- bedroom, 1-bath 
ranch, low taxes, new carpet, 
ready to move In, deck on 
front, screened porch on 
back, 1-1/2 car garage, 
$111/500.(847)223-1926. 

KENOSHA NEW CON- 
STRUCTION, 4314 31st. 
Ave. Maintenance free exteri- 
or, new appliances, 2-bed - 
rooms, 1-bath, expandable 
lower level, plumbed for 2nd. 
bath. $109,900. (414) 
552-9551. 

KENOSHA, WISC. 

RANCH, 3-bedrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, partially finished base- 
ment with workshop, fenced 
backyard, 1-1/2 detached ga- 
rage with attached shed, 
$109500. (414) 942-1423. 

KENOSHA, WISCONSIN 3- 
BEDROOMS, 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage, new wind- 
ows/doors/roof . large lot and 
spa, $128,000. (414) 
694-0170. 

LAKE BLUFF 4-BED- 
ROOM, 3- bath, 29732 But- 
teryfly Ct, finished walk-out 
basement, on premium lot. 
$375.000. (847) 735-8189. 

LAKE VILLA 3-BED- 
ROOM. 2-bath quad level on 
2-lots. 2-car garage, above 
ground pool, room off deck 
wtth hot tub, lakerights to 
Chain. One year home war- 
ranty Included. $169,900, 
(847)356-8363. 

LAKE VILLA BY OWNER, 

4-bedroom, 3-bath, vaulted 
ceiling, eat-tn kitchen, dining- 
room, spacious layout, big tot 
and yard, quiet neighborhood. 
' Graystake schools, shopping 
and train nearby, 

$192,500/bost. Serious only. 
no agents. (847) 548-2708. 

LAKE VILLA GRAYSLAKE 
Schools, beautiful model Bko 
home. In Sutton On The Lake 
'Subdivision, 4-bedrooms, ce- 
ramic floors, neutral carpeting, 
oak cabinets, drywaiied ga- 
rage, plus marry more up- 
grades. Financing available. 
$189,900. (B47) 356-0631. 

LAKE VILLA NEWER raised 
ranch. 3-bedrooms, 2-baths, 
C/A, fireplace, cathedral ceil- 
ings, corner of Genoa and 
Granada, Lake Villa. 
$155,900. (847) 356-2506. 

LAKE ZURICH/ECHO 
LAKE, by owner. Charming 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath, partial base- 
ment, new roof and hardwood 
flooring, 2-car attached ga- 
rage, $137,900. (847) 
438-7366. 

LAKE/MCHENRY CO. 
FORECLOSURES. 

Learn how to buy FHA/VA 

REPO'S starting at $32,000. 

CoJowell Banker 

(847)222-6661. 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad in 

Classified, call us at 

(847) 223-8161 exL 140 

and leave a message. 

We win get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

fax our 24- hour fax line al 

(847)2232691. 

LEASE PURCHASE UN- 
DENHURST, only $3,000 
down, buys beautiful brick and 
vinyl sided, 2-story. 4-bed- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, famiryroom 
with fireplace, diningroom, 
basement. 2-car garage, only 
2yrs. old, $1,600/month plus 
utilities, $196,000. (847) 
223-8269. 

UBERTYVILLE 423 AMES 
Owner financing possible, 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, ga- 
rage, $224,900. (847) 
362-2833. 

UNDENHURST COUN- 

TRY PLACE BY OWNER 2- 
story townhouse, beautifully 
decorated, neutral colors. 3- 
bedrooma, 2-1/2 baths, with 
loft, livingroom with fireplace, 
large kitchen with nook, all ap- 
pliances, many upgrades, at- 
tached 2-car garage, 2-1/2yrs. 
okj. (847) 265-2183. 



UNDENHURST FOR 

SALE BY OWNER,' raised 
ranch, 4-bedrooms. 2-full 
baths. 2-1/2 car - detached 
HEATED garage, enough 
room for 2-cari and a boat, 
oak floors, crown molding, 
large deck, C/A BJ. Hooper 
School/Graystake High 

School. $159,900. Shown by 
appointment (647) 356-3548, 

UNDENHURST IMMACU- 
LATE 2-BEDROOM ranch, 
wtth C/A, tut finished base- 
ment featuring: 3rd. bedroom, 
laundryroom, workshop and 
large famiryroom. Lots of stor- 
age. Custom deck, mature 
trees and landscaping. (847) 
358-0109. 

UNDENHURST LAKE- 
FRONT PROPERTY NEW 
CONSTRUCTION CUS- 
TOM BUILT HOME 4-bed- 
room, fun basement, formal 
living and diningroom, family- 
room with fireplace, large 
kitchen with Island, master 
suite features whirlpool tub 
and cathedral ceiling, 2-story 
foyer, hardwood floors, 9ft. 
eeiings. close to forest pre- 
serve, $329,000. (847) 
356-0982. 

MCHENRY/LAKE CO. 

FORECLOSURES. 

Learn how to buy FHAA/A ~ 

REPO'S starting at $32,000. 

CokJwetl Banker 

(847) 222-5040. 

MUNDELEIN HIGH VIS- 
IBILITY location, excellent 
commercial potential, located 
on major thoroughfare, 
BSOsq.h... 50fLx150fL site. 2- 
bedroom, 1 -bath, full unfin- 
ished basement. 1-car de- 
tached garage, new roof, new 
bath, all new insulated wind- 
ows, new furnace, new C/A/C, 
modem kitchen. 0.6ml. to Me- 
tra. $130,000. (847) 
949-5327. 

MUNOELEIN/LOCH LO- 
MAND BY OWNER.- 3-bed- 
room remodeled ranch, with 
finished basement, 1 -block 
from private beach, $169,900. 
(847) 568-8042. 

NEAR QURNEE. ILLINOIS 
BY OWNER Immaculate 4- 
bedroom, 2.5 bath. loft, base- 
ment, bar, fireplace, C/A, 
deck, fenced rear. $198,000. 
$12,000 below market (847) 
818-3798. Realtor gets in July. 
Possible owner financing. 

ON THE BOULEVARD 
Great Neighborhood 7816 
20th Ave., Kenosha. Wise 2- 
bedrooms, possible 3-bed- 
room ranch, livingroom, farnj- 
ryroom, large eat-in kitchen, 1- 
3/4 bath, 1-1/2 car garage, 
large fenced In yard, 

$105.900. (414) 656-2301. 

PETITE LAKE CHANNEL 
FRONT HOME on 3 lots, 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath. air, fire- 
place. 2-1/2 car garage, hot 
tub In large deck, all applianc- 
es included, very own boat 
ramp. $187,000. (847) 
838-6008. . 

READY TO MOVE IN Au- 
burn Meadows, LindenhursL 
2-story, 4-bedroom. 2.5 baths, 
formal Irvingroom/diningroom, 
eat-in kitchen, fireplace in fa- 
miryroom, first floor 9fL ceil- 
ings, full finished basement, 
hardwood floors in entry and 
mast or bed room, oversized 
laundryroom. beautifully land- 
scaped large brick patio, near 
park/nature preserve, many 
upgrades, $209,900. (847) 
265-8157. . 



ROUND LAKE BEACH - For 
sale by owner. No bank fi- 
nancing neccessary. Only 
$4,500 down. 3 bedroom, 2 
bath. Split level. Fireplace In 
family room. 2 car garage. 
Call (630) 375-7442 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 231 
Wildwood Dr.. 3-bedroom tri- 
level, built 1992. great condi- 
tion, early closing bonus, 
broker coop. $107,500. (847) 
546-8947. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bedroom ranch. 2-full baths, 
full finished basement, nicety 
landscaped, deck off bed- 
room, shed, fenced yard. Lots 
of added extras, $103,900. 
(647) 740-3350. 

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS 
3+bedrooms, 2+car garage. 
Asking $100,000. (847) 740- 
1384 leave message. 

ROUND LAKE PARK Excep- 
tionally nice 3-bedroom, 25 
bath, plus loft, bright and airy, 
9ft. ceilings main floor, many 
upgrades, boat slip, $179,500. 
(847) 546-7090. 



SOUTHSIDE 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH, with recroom In . 
basemen, newer carpeting In . 
Irvtngroom, hardwood floors in 
bedrooms, oversized garage. 
Many extras. (414) 694-5698 
for appointment. 

SPRING GROVE METICU- 
LOUS stone cedar custom 
built home. 4-bedrooms, 4- 
baths, on 15 wooded acres, 
3,300sq.ft„ walk-out base- 
ment, open loft overlooking 
greatroom with stone fire- 
place, 2-whifipooi baths, wrap 
around deck, 35 car garage, 
upgrades galore. By owner 
$339.000. (815) 675-3800. 

SPRING GROVE WATERS. 
FRONT, nice 1 -bedroom cot- 
tage with firoptace, also large 
fenced-in backyard, plus boat 
dock, owner financing, 
$89,900. 10% down, 
$750/month. (847) 497-3256, 
(847) 988-2078. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKE- 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNET! Visit 
lttp://www,lpnews.com/ to 
place your ads convenJerttly. 
Ads appear on the internet. In 
'all Lakeland Papers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only $19.75 
for 15 words, then 15c each 
additional word. "" 

WAUKEGAN THREE BED- 
ROOMS, 2-1/2 baths, 2-car ' 
attached garage, park (ike lot 
1 acre, 2800sq.fL, $193,000. 
(847) 623-3105. 

TWO BEOROOM, 1- 
BATH, Hoosq.n. home, hot 
tub, 2-1/2 acres. 340fL river 
frontage, on Wisconsin River. 
Just 15 minutes North of the 
Dells. $120,000. (608) 
339-0527. 

VA/HUD REPOSI 

New (lata weekly. 

Call Ryan 8 Co., Realtors 

•Your Repo Specialis t s." 

(847)828-0300. 



VERNON HILLS 
PATH 4-bedrooms. 
2.5 car garage, 
floors, many recent 
excellent family 
hood/schooU, 
{847)680-3852. 



DEER- 

25 baths, 
hardwood 
upgrades, 
neighbor- 

$225,900. 



VINTAGE BEAUTY, 
GREAT Waukegan neighbor- 
hood. 3-bedrooms. hardwood 
floors and trim, fireplace, cen- 
tral air, $134,900. (847) 
662-594Z 

WAUCONDA 3-BED- 

ROOM, 1-1/2 bath, hard- 
wood floors, interior updates, 
take/beach rights, needs exte- 
rior updating. $112,400. (847) 
526-1899. 



WAUCONDA BANGS 

LAKE 908 MaoTson, 2-bed- 
room, summer cottage, city 
sewer, natural gas Installed, 
private beach, boat launch 
and anchoring. Reduced to 
$71,900. (706) 562-2033. 



WAUCONDA FOR SALE by 
owner, 4-bedroom, 2-1/2 bath. 
Can for info. Days (847) 296- 
0302. evenings (847) 
526-4522. ask for Mike. 



WAUKEGAN 1701 PAR- 
TRIDGE, 3-bedroom. totally 
rehabbed, full basement, A/C, 
$99,000. OPEN HOUSE SUN- 
DAY 1pm-3pm. (847) 
662-8614. (847) 334-6614. 



WILDWOOD FSBO 

RANCH, 2-bedrooms*den. 
newly remodeled kitchen and 
bathroom, attached garage 
with work shop, on a comer lot 
with mature trees. 18558 
OLD PLANK RD. $123,500. 
(847) 223-4471. 



WILL BUY OR LEASE 
YOUR HOUSE. 

Any area, condition, or price. 
(847)973-1193. 



WINTHROP HARBOR 4- 
BEOROOMS, great location, 
marry updates; $155,000. 
(847) 748-8651 after 6pm. 

ZION BY OWNER Charming 
3-bedroom, 3-bath, fireplace, 
2-car, nice neighborhood, 
across from park, $129,000. 
(847)872-6164. 



ZION CUTE 3-BEDROOM, 

hardwood floors, big base- 
ment, large yard, perfect In- 
vestment home, 7% aasum- 
able. (708) 598-0858. 






w - rf* , 



I* 



C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



October 1, 1999 



V 



./ 



500 



Homes For Sale 



COLDWATER, MI 
I (S. MI)- Co!dwa(cr Lake | 

Home For Sale by 

Owner. 230' lake fmlg, 

over 3200sf, 

[<f-6BR/<fBA, a/c, gas heat, 

underground sprinkler 

sys, 5c-gar, new cedar 

siding & new roof.$675K. 

For more info & pics: 

, www.Iisicdbyowncr.com 

517-238-2265 



504 



Homes For Rent 



FOX LAKE 2-BEDROOM 
duplex, basomont. stovo/ro- 
frigerator, $725/month plus 
socurity and utilities. Call for 
appointment. (647) 587-2622. 

FOX LAKE 2-BEDROOM 
lake home, with dock, 
$950/month. (947) 546-2122. 

QRAYSLAKE 

3-bodroom, 2-bath, 

newty decorated home, 

garago, basomont, 
C/A. appliances. 

No pels. 

2/months security, 

$l,235/monih. 

(647) 362-5600. 

QURNEE 6252 FOB- 
MOOR, Cambridge Homo 
surrounded by golf course, 4- 
bedrooms, 3-1/2 baths, 2-car 
garago, 4yrs. old. No pets. 
$2.500/month. (847) 

675-8927, (S47) 675-2004. 

QURNEE RENT WITH OP- 
TtON TO BUY. 4-bedrooms, 
2.5 baths, family room with firo- 
place, hardwood floors, 1st. 
floor office, 3-car garage. 
Available 10/1, $2,lQO/month. 
(S47) B16-1529. 

HOUSE ON HORSE 
STABLE PROPERTY 3-bod- 
room, 2-bath home in Lake Vil- 
la, [ust down the road from the 
new grammar school. 
$1 ,250/morrth, stalls are avail- 
able If desired. For more Info, 
call (847) 587-2983 after 
6:30pm. ' 

LAKE VILLA 2-STORY, 3- 
large bedrooms. 2-1/2 baths, 
huge kitchen with appliances, 
dining room, livingroom with 
fireplace, English basement, 
master suite with skylights and 
whirlpool, 2-car garage, large 
fenced yard, Lake Villa 
Schools. $1,600/month. (647) 
265-9514, 

LEASE PURCHASE LIN- 
DENHURST, only $3,000 
down, buys beautiful brick and 
vinyl elded, 2-story, 4-bed- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, famllyroom 
with lireptaco, dinlngroom, 
basement, 2-car garago, only 
2yts. old, $1,6O0/month plus 
Utilities, $196,000. (647) 
223-6269. 

UBERTYVILLE CHARM- 
INQ OLDER home, lovingly 
updated, on bike path, walk to 
train, schools, downtown Ub- 
ertyvllle, 3-bodrooms, 
screened porch, detached ga- 
rage, $1 ,300/month. (647) 
680-7645. 

LONG LAKE 2-BEDROOM 
cottage. Short term rental 
available October 1st.- May 

26th. $esO/month. (847) 
392-1 904.. 

NEWER HOME IN MUNDE- 
LEIN, 4-bodroom, 2-1/2 bath, 
2-car garage, famllyroom 
overlooking pond, available 
Immediately, long term OK, 
$l,850/month. Purchase op- 
tion. Broker (647) 634-6311 
evenings/weekends. 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bedroom, 1.5 bath, huge 
greatroom, eat-In kitchen; di- 
nlngroom, large double lot 
fenced In yard, 2,5 heated ga- 
rage. Available Immediately, 
$1 ,000-51 ,250/month plus se- 
curity and utilities. References 
required. (847) 265-7805. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 2- 

bedroom house, C/A, large 
kitchen, appliances, no pets. 
$750/monih plus security. Ref- 
erences and credit check' re- 
quired. (847)740-3534. 



WONDER LAKE WITH Op- 
tion to buy, 1yr. new 3-bed- 
room raised ranch with den, 2- 
car garage, 1-bath, roughed In 
for 2nd, all appliances Includ- 
ed, $1,100/month plus securi- 
ty. (815) 726-0353. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



ALGONQUIN/BARRING* 
TON BRAND NEW deluxe 2- 
bodroom, 2-bath townhome, 
fireplace, A/C, 1-car garago, 
upper ranch unit, Including 
greatroom, deck, yard. Lako 
Cook Rd & Algonquin Rd., 
$139,900 or offer. . (847) 
487-4279. 

CONDO FOR SALE Vaca- 
tion Village, Fox Lako, 1 -bod- 
roam Clipper, pool, maffna, 
socurity gate, 539,000/bost. 
(847)587-1109. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 3- 
bodroom townhomo In Grays- 
lake, 2-car garage, newer car- 
poling, freshly painted Interior 
and exterior, finished base- 
mont with laundryroom, walk 
to town, shopping and trains, 
$97,000. (847) 2Q4-1300 
leave message. 

UBERTYVILLE 2-BED- 

ROOM condo for rent, central 
air, all appliances, closo to Mo- 
tra/downtown, S685/month. 
No pets. (847) 360-8842. 

MCHENRY NEW CONDO, 

2-bodroom, 2-bath, full base- 
ment, 2-car garage, in great 
neighborhood. No pots. 1yr. 
lease. S975/month. (615) 
385-8630. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 
TOWNHOME 3-bodroom, 1- 
1/2 bath, garage, appliances. 
Soction 8 OK. 5880/month. 
(847) 397-2282 after 6pm. 

SILVER LAKE CONDO 
FOR RENT. 1 -bedroom, near 
lako, 5550/month Includes 
A/C, fireplace, washer/dryer. 
Available October 1st. (847) 
392-0736 evenings, (312) 
996-8270 days, Ernlo. 

TOWNHOME IN HOFF- 
MAN ESTATES, close to high- 
way, school and library, 2-bod- 
rooms, 1-1/2 baths, $91,000 
below appraised value. (847) 
973-0992. 

VACATION VILLAGE 1- 
BEDROOM, completely fur- 
nished condo, available Oc- 
tober 1st, 5575/month plus se- 
curity. (847) 548-8830. 

VERNON HILLS TOWN- 
HOUSE FSBO, 3-bodroom, 1- 
car attached garago, new car- 
pot, all appliances Included, 
excellent condition, great loca- 
tion next to playground. 
Hawthorn Schools. S96.900. 
(847) 680-7632. 



MARCO ISLAND, FL- 

Beachfront condo. 

Prices thousands 

below market for 

quick sale before 

season. Boat access 

to Gulf of Mexico. 

$272K. Others avail. 

Collier Realty, 

SamCavallo 

941-597-0000 




14X70 FAIRMONT MO- 
BILE home In Beach Park, IL 
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, fire- 
place, deck, Asking $23,900, 
negotiable. (847) 625-1766. 

1989 MARATHON MO- 
TORHOME 24'. 5.7 liter en- 
gine, sleeps 6, bod In back, 
only 37,000 miles, Excellent 
condition. (414)534-4553 

1092 14X70 MANUFAC- 
TURED HOME, 3-bodrooms, 
1-bath, nice size yard, 
$25,000 with $1,000 rebate. 
(847) 740-3519. 

DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE 
HOME Newty remodeled kitch- 
en and den, formal dining- 
room, 2-full baths, 2-3 bed- 
rooms, centra) air, kitchen ap- 
pliances, new shingled roof, 2 
sheds, fenced yard. Must see, 
(847) 546-8689 after 6pm 
weekdays or weekends. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

OVER 55 COMMUNITY , 

1995 1-bedroom, 1-bath 

with shad, 

$32,900. 

1995 2-bodroom, 2-bath, 

with oarage, carport, 

and shed. 

$56,000. 

1900 1 -bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, 

with carport and shed, 

$29,000. 

(847)526-5000 

leave message. 



518 



Mobile Homes 



MARSHFIELD 2-BED- 
ROOM, ALL APPLIANC- 
ES, AIR, NEW vinyl siding, 
shod, now carpet. In retire- 
ment park, ago 55. $8,900. 
(414)694-0164. 

MOBILE 1990 CARROLL- 
TON Double wide, Kenosha, 
nowly carpeted, air, 3-bod- 
rooms, 2-baths, natural flre- 
placo, deck, shod, $41,500. 
(414) 552-7666. 

MOBILE HOME 12X46, 
nowly decorated, stored In Elk- 
horn, Wise. Must sell. 
53,750/bost. (708) 453-5946. 

MOBILE HOME 14X70, 
clean, ready to movo Into. Nice 
size kitchen with casing area, 
2-bodroom, full bath, control 
air. Call for appointment. 
512,500/bost. Mako an offer. 
(847)526-1285. 

MOBILE HOME 16X60 2- 

bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, covered 
dock and carport. Rainbow 
Lake Manor, adult park, 
$50.000. (847) 395-3585. 

MOBILE HOME VERY nice, 
1991, 16x70. with all applianc- 
es, now control air condition, 
shod, located In new area, 
near Great America. Financ- 
ing available $21,500. (847) 
244-6720, (847) 838-1965. ■ 

MODULARS - DOU- 
BLEWIDES - SINGLEWIDES 
• ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES, 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 
MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALU FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
798-1541. 

OAKOALE ESTATES 

HWY. KR & 1-84, Konosha. 

1986 North Amorican, 16x80, 
2-bodrooms, central air, shed, 
deck, all appl lances included, 
attractive lot, $32,900. (414) 
679-0079. 



SHORECREST 


POINT 2- 


BEDROOM, 


14x70, 


510,000/bost. 


(414) 


654-8816. 





SHORECREST POINT 

LOT 78, 1995, 3-bodrooms, 
2-full baths, air, all appliances, 
(414) 652-9443 leave mes- 
sage. 




A DETAILED 1-BEDROOM 
studio In a well maintained 
brick, rofinlshed mahogany, 
solid plaster, 3-closols. dining, 
A/C, laundry, parking. Hard to 
find quality at $535. (847) 
910-1389. 

EXTRA LARGE FOX LAKE 
WATERFRONT 1-bodroom, 
A/C, free heat and water, laun- 
dry lacllitles, (847) 662-0034. 

FOX LAKE heated 1-bod- 
room, waterfront, Rt. 12, near 
Metra, appliances and laun- 
dry, 5595/month plus credit 
check/security. (70S) 

788-5564. 



FOX LAKE STUDIO 

$450/month, marina swim- 
ming, golf, tennis. Private 
beach, 24hr. security, lyr., 
lease and good credit re- 
quired. Call Jim for appoint- 
ment (847) 973-1454. 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



OAICRIDGEVILLAGE 
AJPARTM EFMTS 



Offering Affortlable Housing for 
Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 
1. 2, & 3 Bedroom Apartments 

Wheel clmir acctrsilble, 1 bedroom. 

Slop In at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antloch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
1 -800-526-0844 TDD 

Mwimj by Meridian QfOUP. Inc. 




Uluwood VitUqE Apartments 

In IsIaniJ Uki ANd GiuysUkc 

OfftRiNC, AlloRclAUlE llOUSlNC ( (OR QUAliftEd AppllCANIS. 
NOW ACCEplJNq AppllCAliONS (or OUR: 

• 1,2 ANd J bidnoom ApAnrmtNtt 
• Wnttt'CHAtM Acctaiblf, 1 bidmoom 

PICASC CaII (OR MOKE InIoRMAIIom OR AppoiNIMINI At: 

(847) 225-6644 TDD# (800) *26-0844 

LAktwood VjIIa(je ApARiMiNt is psofcwloN*lly MANM\cd by 
MmidiAN Gnoup, Inc. 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



QURNEE 3-OEDROOM, 
GREAT location, C/A, wash- 
or/dryor hook-up, no pets, ap- 
plication and security rea- 
quired. $750/month (647) 
244-6199 woekdays 9am- 
5pm. 

QURNEE LARGE 2-BED- 
ROOM apartment, 1-1/2 
baths, woodbumlng flroplaco, 
dishwasher, range, refrigera- 
tor, air, laundry and storage, 
exorcise room, socurity and In- 
tercom system, Individual ga- 
rage, $825/monlh. No pets. 
(847)336-1072. 

GURNEE/WAUKEQAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices, 
.Spacious. 
Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy lo Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

ISLAND LAKE 

AVAILABLE 

IMMEDIATELY 

Hoated 2-bedroom, 

$705/month. 

Heated 1-bodroom 

$605/monlh. 

Unhealed, 2-bodroom 

$665/month. 

Unhealed 1 -bedroom, 

$585/month. 

.1-1/2 months security. 

No pots. 

(847) 526-5000 

loave message 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA. Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$645-$760/month. Hoot, wa- 
ter, air Included. (847) 
356-5474. 

LARGE STUDIO APART* 
MENT Beautiful Vacation vil- 
lage, 24hr. security, 
$430/month plus 1-1/2 
months socurity deposit. (847) 
587-5675. 

MUNDELEIN 1, 2 & 3 bed- 
room apartments, starting 
at $725/month, heat, water 
and gas Included. For more In- 
formation call (047) 
949-6891. 

SMALL 2-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, available Oc- 
tober 1st. $550/month plus se- 
curity, no pots, all utilities In- 
cluded, Mundeleln area. (847) 
949-1604. 

VACATION VILLAGE STU- 
DIO APARTMENT, 
$500/monlh. No pots. (847) 
356-3397. 

WAUCONDA 1-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, heat and hoi 
water Included, $565/month 
plus socurity deposit and 
lease. No pots. Roforences. 
Available Immediately. (847) 
433-0891. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Located In an 

over 65 community. 

BEAUTIFUL 

LARGE STUDIO, 

with attached healed garage, 

$795/month. 

Available Immediately. 

No pets. 

Security deposit required. 

(847) 526-5000 

loave message. 



ZION 1 A 2 bedroom upper 
units, good neighborhood, 

$515-$G00/ month, security 
deposit required. No dogs, No 
Section 8. (847) 2040376. 

ZION 3-BEDROOM, EAST 
SIDE, new kitchen, carpeted, 
heat Included, no pels, 
$735/monlh plus oloctrlc. 
(847) 831-5388. 



528 



ApL/llomcs 
To Share 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

Gurnoo, quiet gontloman look- 
ing for qulot female room- 
mate to sharo 2-bedroom 
apartment. No smoking, no 
pets. $500/month, $500 de- 
posit, 1/2 utilities. (647) 
263-1300 days, ask for 
Glenn. 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



LOOKINQ FOR MALE OR 
FEMALE to sharo our homo in 
the town of Bristol, Wisconsin, 
$400/month Includes utilities. 
Across tho stroot from Boach 
and lako. Must like children 
and cats. If Interested ptoaso 
contact Michello or Tom. (414) 
862-7431. 

TWO ROOMS AVAILABLE 

FOR RENT 

In large Lake Villa home, 

oft Rt. 60 & 132, 

fully furnished, 

$37S-$40Q/montri. 

1.600-255-4859 

oxt. 4669, 
(847)97341128, 
(414) 889-2012. 



538 



Business Property 
For Renl 



ANTIOCH INDUSTRIAL 
PARK, 3200sq.ft., beautiful of- 
fices. 2-boths, heat. A/C. can 
be dividod. Starting at 
$1,600/month. (847) 
395-1002. 

FOX LAKE ON Rt. 12. 

1200sq.f1.. commercial, excel- 
lent visibility, stroot level, hoat- 
od. (708) 786-5564 leave 
message. 

QRAYSLAKE - SMALL re- 
tail spaces for root. Historic 
downtown Center St. (847) 
604-3295 

OFFICE SPACE FOR 
RENT IN QRAYSLAKE. 

Conveniently located In park 
like setting. 1-2 offices with 
waiting area, private bath and 
storage. Part of converted resi- 
dence, with existing law office. 
(B47) 548-6637. 

WAUCONDA COMMER- 
CIAL/RETAIL, 

5.0O0SQ.FT., Main Shoot lo- 
cation, ample parking. Avail- 
able 10/1. $2,500/month; Call 
Bob Olson (847) 526-5101. 



<mmn 



RICHMOND 

Rt. 12. 
1 200 8.1. bid*. 

w/ovcrhcad gar, 
door w/outdoor 

display lot. Location 
for 2 signs; Great 

visibility. $595/mo. 

Land Mgmt. 

815-6784334 



540 



Irtvcsimem Property 




SIX APARTMENT UNITS 
All brick with garages, North 
side Waukogan, good cash 
flow. No contracts. (847) 

GG2-324t, 

BAR< 

i shqpper ; 

BARGAIN SHOPPER 

SPECIAL OFFER 

DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OH LESS? 

BARGAIN SHOPPER 

SPECIAL OFFER I 

15 words or loss gets you an 

ad for $5.00. 

SPECIAL OFFER: Run your 

ad for 2 weeks, and rocorvo 

2 wooks FREEI 

Call Lisa (847) 223-8161 

oxt. 140 or send tho ad with 

with your payment to: 

Lakoland Publishers, 

P. 0. Box 268, 

30 S. Whitney SL, 

Graystako III. 60030. 

Attn: Lisa. 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



(2) .0 ACRE LOTS, 140ft. 
nvor frontage on Wisconsin 
River, recreational use only. 
Only 15 minutes North of the 

Dolls, $18,000. (608) 
339-9527. 

BUILD TO SUITI TREVOR, 
WISCONSIN 1/2 acre parcel, 
private well on sewer. (414) 
862-2197. 

HALF ACRE LOT FOR 
SALE Private cul-de-sac, 
city tawsr, well water, 2 
milts North of Antloch on 
Rt, 83. Call for Info. Mutt 
MO. (815)344-8885, 

LOOKINQ FOR A LOT? 1 
aero lot, Spring Grove, $2,000 
down, no Interest or payments 
for 18 months or wid discount 
for cash. Call owner (615) 
878-4228. 



LOT AND HALF FOR SALE 
In city of Burlington, by owner. 
Asking $42,500. For more In- 
formation Call (414) 
551-8843. . -- 

POPLAR GROVE, ILLI- 
NOIS Oouble lot on North 
Main Street. Residential. 
$45,000/negotiablo. (815) 
765-2133. 

TWO ACRES SOUTH ot An- 

boch off Route 59. Trinity Ter- 
race Subdivision, (across from 
Flora Acres), located on cul- 
de-sac on Terry Lane. (847) 
395-2654 after 6pm. 



WAUCONDA AREA IDEAL 
FOR LANDSCAPERS AND 
CONTRACTORS, AP- 

PROXIMATELY 1/2 ACRE. 
FENCED IN LOT with 
730sq.fl office, 192sq.fL ga- 
rage, 920sq.ft trailer space, 
$945/monih plus security. 
Available October 1st. 
12O0SQ.FT. BUSINESS 

WITH OFFICE. $795/month 
plus utilities. Available Imme- 
diately. OPEN YARD 
STORAGE FOR RENT, 
with or without office trailer, 
various sized spaces avail- 
able. Coll for prices. (647) 
626-6000, Itava mes- 
sage. 



New Building 

(2)- 1800 so. ?L 

Industrial Warehouses. 

Round Lake Industrial Park 

24 ft ceiling, fenced yard. 

12 ft. overhead door 

847-M6.I474 



564 



Resort/Vacatoo 
Rentals 



568 



OulOfAraPropen) 



20 ACRES OF BEAUTIFUL 
TEXAS LAND. 25 mites east of 
Booming El Paso. Roads, sur- 
veyed, references. $7,995, $0 
down, $80/month. Money- 
back guarantee. No qualifying 
1-800-227-6115. 
www.sunsetranches.com 



ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed class ifletl 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive d misleading statement 
from another firm requeu- 
ing payment for this advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it lo your account, all pay- 
ments for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Hmptpen 

ro Bocae* 

SO ■. Whitney It. 

QrsiTsiaJm. iL eooao-oaoe 



REPO NO OP, Hardy, Arkan- 
sas, 6.2 wooded acres M/L 
$130.53/mo. Water, electric, 
great hunting/fishing close to 
Spring River. Welkins & Co, 
Real Estate, 1- 888-809-7722. 



568 



Out of Area 

Property 



SOUTHERN COLORADO 
RANCH SALE 88AC - 
$39,900. Enjoy sonsailonoi 
sunsota over tho Rockies and 
vlows of Pikos Pook on gentry 
rolling terrain. Long road fron- 
tage, telo 4 eloc. Ideal for 
horses. Exc. financing. Call toll 
iroo 877-670-6387 Halchot 
Ranch. 

TN LAKE BARGAIN - 
$17,900. $1,600 down. Boat 
dock. Beautifully wooded lot at 
spectacular 30,000 aero lako. 
Paved road, utilities, sur- 
veyed, soils tested. Local bank 
has appraised • will flnanco 
7.25% fixed. 15 years. Only 
$147/month. Priced lo sod Im- 
mediately. Offered first come, 
firat served. Call now 800-861 • 
5253, oxt. 2301. 

WISCONSIN DELLS 

AHEA'S NEWEST PRESTIGI- 
OUS SINOLE family home- 
sites. Lfve worlds opart from 
the glamour or any amenity 
. you can Imagine. Champion- 
ship golf course 1/2 acre 
woodod homosltos. sewer In- 
cluded. From $21,950. Limited 
golf and aki memberships left. 
1 -800-929- 2599. Biuegroen 
Corp. 



#1 CAMPGROUND MEM- 
BERSHIP AND T1MESHARE 
RESALE CLEARINGHOUSE. 
DONT 'WANT YOURS? 
WELL TAKE IT. BUYI SELU 
RENT1 RESORT SALES INTL 
1-800-423-5967. 

CAMPGROUND MEMBER- 
SHIP COAST-TO-COAST 

Travel America Resort Parks 
International (RPl), homo 
park, sparkling springs, near 
Rockford, 111. $800, seller will 
pay transfer foes. (414) 

694-5253. 




CEMETARY PLOT IN do- 

slreabto location of Wind 
Rldgo Momorial Pork, Section 
4 Estates, Lot 12S plot for two. 
Full service (except casket). 
Save hundreds of dollars on 
current market value. Asking 
$5,500. Call anytime, leave 
message (647) 546-5224. 

CEMETERY LOT NORTH 
SHORE GARDEN OF MEMO- 
RY. North Chicago, Section X 
in Chriftufs Garden, worth 
$1,300, selling $900. (847) 
244-4694. 

EVERGREEN IN BAR- 
RINGTON 8-gravo sites, 
$500/ea. (847) 526-7268. 

HIGHLAND' MEMORIAL' 
PARK-UDERTYVILLE Gar- 
den of Devotion Lot 110, 41 & 
2. $1,500/bolh. Phone Oeala, 
Florida (352) 854-1 492/ 



578 



Real Estate Misc. 



TIMESHARE - DELUXE 
studio located on beach In Si 
Martin. Beautiful resort with 
many amenllles, asking 
$4300 or best. (414) 
654-3441. 

YOGI BEAR CAMP- 
QROUND-FT. ATKINSON, 
Wl. Own a piece of Joiiysione - 
1995 Gulfstream Conquest 
35ft. Travel Trailer with 12ft, 
slldooul, 2-bedroom, rear 
bunk, loaded, and a 1988 Ya- 
maha gotf cart. All of this with 
year around access on a largo 
lot with shed for $13,500. 
(847) 265-7805. 



704 



Recreational 
VcWdes 



: 



1978 WINNEBAGO 

BRAVE 23ft., water, electric 
generator, Dodge 360 engine, 
runs good, needs minor re- 
pairs, $4,300/besL (847) 927- 
0441,(847)528-0391. 

1982 24FT. KAYOT PON- 
TOON BOAT, Includes chairs 
and O/B motor, $4,500. (847) 
395-8637. 

1988 JAYCO POP- UP 
CAMPER, designer series, 
sleeps 6, furnace, fridgo, bike 
rack, and potty, $l,800/besL 
(847)223-6234. 

1990 COACHMAN CAMP- 
ER 30f1., excellent condition. 
very dean, sloops 6, separate 
bedrom, awning, $7,000. 
(847)223-0022. 

1995 WINNEBAQO 34FT, 

slide-out. Jacks, loaded, under 
16K, excellent condition, 
$49,900. (847) 599-7430 
days. (647) 746-3237 even- 
Ings, (847) 872-0752 8pm- 
9pm. , 

1997 SOFT. YELLOW- 
STONE • CAPRJ 6TH 
WHEEL TRAVEL TRAIL- 

ER, with slide out All weather 
unit. Includes oak cabinets, 
washer/dryer, smooth fiber- 
glass skin and more. 
$22,600/POSL (847) 776-0226. 

1999 14FT. FLAGSTAFF 
CRANK-UP CAMPER FOR 

SALE. Has A/C, used only 
once, $7,500. Please call 
(715) 963-2900. 



19*9 JAMBOREE MOTOR 
HOME 24ft., 24K, $24,000. 
(647)439-0568. 



October 1, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C25 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



COACHMAN 10ft} CATA- 
UNA, 27(t. t fully equipped, 
5th wheel, microwave, stove, 
refrigerator, sleeps, 6, central 
air and heat with owning, lm- 
maculate condition, must sol), 
S8,450/best. (647) 543-5680. 

DODGE TRAMS VAN MO- 
TORHOME, 1081 V8, pro- 
pone and electric, port-apot' 
ty, low miloago, runs great, 
stova, refrigerator. (414) 
877-9479 after Bpm. 

LAYTON 1093 TRAVEL 
TRAILER 26ft., front bedroom, 
rear bunk, stoopi 8, full bath, 
awning, A/C, hitch Included, 
$8,900.(847)249-0166. 

MOTORHOME 1995 

PACE Arrow, 33fl, Chev 454, 
under 20K miles, fully loadod, 
sJoops 4, Includes car caddy 
and hitch. S84.S00. (847) 
623-4874. 

SOUTH WIND 1988, 27FT. 
Class A MH, fully self-con- 
tained, very clean, 
$11,8O0/best. (847) 

862-0837. ___ 

UNION GROVE 1972 RoUo- 
home 14x70 with a 12x18 ad- 
dition, 3-bedrooms, covered 
deck, 2 sheds. Includes ap- 
pliances. Asking «27,0OQ/bosL 
(414) B7B-2726. 




TWO SKI DOO SNOWMO- 
BILE ENGINES (1) Rebuilt 440 
-season). 440 liquid cooiod- 
ROTEX complete with twin 
carborators, twin exhaust and 
clutch. $500/best. (1) 1992 
617 liquid cooled ROTEX. 
complete with twin carbora- 
tors, exhaust manifold and 
dutch. $i.000/bost. Call (847) 
922 3371. 

TWO SKIDOO SNOWMO- 
BILES (1) 1996 SKIDOO 
FORMULA SS, 670 liquid 
cooled hand/thumb warmers. 
USI skis and auxiliary power 
Jack, complete with cover, 
under 1,000 miles. Best offer 
over $5,000. (1) 1996 SKI 
DOO FORMULA 8 Ian 
cooled hand/thumb ' warmers 
with cover. Best offer $2,500. 
Ideal beginner sled. Both-Best 
offer over $7,000. (847) 922- 
3371. 




16' ALUMA CRAFT, 4pftp 
Merc, depth Tinder, & extra 
stuff, $3,900. 1985 Chevy 
pickup, box. body, for parts. 
(414)279-6841 

16FT. SPARTAN, 25HP 

Evtnrude, trailer, trolling mo- 
tor, 2-fish finders, and many 
extras. $3,000. (847) 
265-2086. 

16FT. RANQER 166V 

1 50HP Evinrudo, many extras, 
$5,600. (815) 675-2854. 

1972 AMF SUCKCRAFT 
I 23ft cuddy, head, VHP, OMC 
I/O, cover, in water, $4,000. 
(847) 816-1250. 



710 



Doali, Motors, 
Etc 



1068 27FT, SEA RAY 268 
SUNDANCER.7.4L (454cu). 
V8 onglne, blue/cream with 
teak Interior, sleeps 6, V- 
berth, aft cabin, dinette, sink, 
2-oumor stove, refrigerator, 

20 gallon fresh water + 10 gal- 
lon hot water, full canvas and 
camper top! Many extras. Very 
clean, onry 400hrs. $25,000. 
Call after 5pm (647) 973-0299. 

1991 YAMAHA SUPER JET 
(stand-up), like new, undor 
50hrs. with Karavan Trailer. 
Wet suit Must see. Must sen, 
$1,600/best. Waterford area 
(414) 614-2474. 

1903 SEA SPRITE 140hp 
MerCrufser, I/O, groat condi- 
tion, M.OOO/best. (847) 395- 
7319 leave message. 

1007 24FT. PONTOON 

BOAT, 120hp Mercury out- 
board, mooring cover, grill 
and many extras. Excellent 
condition, used very little. 
Brand new trailer, used 2* 
times. Low cost of $15,325. 
(847) 265-eS36. 

21 FT. 1971 CORRECT- 
CRAFT 318 V8 Inboard. 
620hrs.. In good shape, great 
for wakeboarding, $3,495. 
(414) 787-6728. 

5-1/2 JOHNSON DUCK 
HUNTING MOTOR, runs 
good, $265/best. (414) 
694-3747. 

BLUE AND WHITE 16ft. 2- 
man Open Cockpit Sal Boat. 
Comes with motor and trailer. 
Excellent condition. Best offer. 
(847)949-9212 

BOAT 1967 BAYUNER CO- 
BRA, 1600 ski boat, 150np 
Evinrudo. Fresh rebuild, very 
good condition. $4,800/best. 
(414) 697-3468. 

CATAMARAN 14FT. 
HOBIE Cat with trailer, $600. 
(647) 395-1760. 

CLASS A 1967 MALLARD, 
33ft long, 63K miles, air condi- 
tioning, generator, microwave, 
$18.000.(414)666-2657. 

CLASSIC WOOD 32FT. 

1967 Chris Craft Frybridge 
Sea Skitl sport fisherman. 
good condition, $7,000/best. 
(847} 295-7976. 

FORMULA 1965 242LS, 
5.7L Merc, M»y equipped, ex- 
cellent condition, 
$15.5O0/best. (847) 
806-0390. 

LUND 17-1/2FT. FISHING 
& PLEASURE BOAT, 4- 
soats, 1995. Gke new, EZ tosd- 
or, 100hp Merc, 9.9 Merc kick- 
er, trotting motor (new), VHF 
radio, Lowrance OPS & fish lo- 
cator, 2-downriggers (new) 
rods, . 2-coverj, . more. 
$16.300.(414)639-0471. 

MASTERCRAFT PRO 

STAR 190, 1966. with trailer. 
69.600. Best Good condition 
ready to sW. (815) 389-3013 



MOTOR 1993 20HP Marin- 
er, console steering, asking 
$1,400.(414)694-6693. 



710 



Boats, Motors, 
Etc 



MOVING - MUST BELLI 
1989 Arrtva. 20ft. open bow ' 
130 More, 3. OUt or. boat slip 
for the rest of the year Includ- 
ed, $5,000/best. (647) 973- 
1848 aflor 5pm. 

SAILBOAT* 18' BUC- 
CANEER Sloop, custom, 
dark green, canvas cover, tar- 
Her. $2.495. (847)526-1069 

SEARAY* 1984 27FT. Soa- 
Ray Sundancer, twin 140hp, 
1 Oft. beam, sleeps 8, full kitch- 
en and bath, A/C and heat, 
stereo CD piayor, new interior, 
camper top, ship to shore ra- 
dio, depth finder, compass 
and speedometer. Groat 
boat. Excel Ion i condition. 
$21,500. Hurry, it wool last! 
(414) 248-6128 or (630) 668- 
3742. 

SELL OUT SALE Small Pro- 
pellers, ski vests, accessories. • 
(815) 365-4729. 

SILVERUNE 1077 19FT. 
1 15 Evfnrude, set-up for Lake 
Michigan fishing. Radio fish- 
findor, downrlggors, weights 
and poles, ski and fish, ready 
for water, $3.SO0VbesL (847) 
685-3263. 



•BASS BOATS 

(19) 
1/2 price & up 

•FISHING BOATS 

(32) 
1/2 Price & up 

•PONTOONS (28) 
XV -26' All Styles 

•JON BOATS 

12'- 18* 
$399 & up 

•MERCURY 

OUTBOARDS (68) 
, $499 4 up 

Many used Boats & 
Outboards, all at 

) car-end doseouts. 
Woodland Pier 1 
414-534-5264 



Call Lisa to place a 
word rate ad here. 
Call 847.223.8161 



720 



Sports Equipment 



TOTAL QYM BRAND new, 
upper booy work out folds for 
easy storage. Asking $200. 
(647) 867-0529. 

NOSHIKI 12-SPEEO CEN- 
TURY MALE BIKE, color- 
maroon. Mint condition. Asking 
$100. (647) 887-0529. 




1946 LUSCHOMBE BA, 
65hp, with fabric wings, wood 
prop and skis. Recent paint 
and glass. Looks and flies 
greaL $16,500. (414) 
246-6702. 



804 



Can for Sale 



1964 CHRYSLER LEBAR- 
ON Convertible, loaded, blue, 
good condition, $6.000/best. 
1068 Chrysler Conquest, red, 
loaded, In good condition, 
$2.800/be3l Ask for Wendy 
or Ray. (847)587-4762 

1985 CAPRICE CLASSIC. 
Groat condition. 1987 Delta 
'68 Oldsmobile. Child Cor- 
vetteBod. (847)740-2013. 

DODGE 1991 SPIRIT, 
110,000 miles, good condi- 
tjCJrV $2.000. (847) 973-1425. 

CHEVROLET 1992 COR- 
VETTE, onry 17,500 mlleal 
Black Rose (purple), with gray 
leather Interior. Car alarm and 
phone included, Beautiful car) 
$20,500/best. (815) 
675-9298. 

TOYOTA 1999 CAMRY 

XLE V6, gray/gray leathor in- 
terior, automatic, 16K, security 
system, A/C, sunroof, arryfm 
CD cassette, $22,000. (847) 
265-2178. 

AUDI 1993 90CS OUAT- 
THO SPORT, 2.8L V6, 5- 
speed, 4WD. an power and 
luxury options, ABS, alrbag, 
leather. Kerry book value over 
$16,500, sacrifice at $13,900. 
0811(847)546-0096. 

CADILLAC 1082 

DEViLLE, 4-door, 52,000 
original miles, black beauty, 
garage kept, must be seen. 
(414) 552-8646. 

CHEVROLET 1967 CAVA- 
LIER, runs great , heat, ask- 
ing $700. (647) 587-3239. 

CHEVROLET MONTE 

CARLO, 1975. Restored to 
showroom condition, all op- 
tions. $6500. (414)659-2424. 

CHEVY 1965 BLAZER, full 
size, very good runner, 
$1,450. (847)662-7583. 

CHEVY 1991 BERETTA, 

ve, well maintained. 
$2,200/best (847) 356-3973 
after 5pm. 

CHEVY 1991 BERETTA, 
66.000 miles, fair condition, 
but rum great, $2,900. 1989 
Yamaha Exciter snowmobile, 
good condition, $1,000. (647) 
740-2219. 

CHEVY 1991 CAVALIER, 
$3,995. CALL EO (847) 625- . 

6400. 

CHEVY 1998 BERETTA 
226. loaded, plus alarm and 
CO changer, black. 71K high- 
way miles, new tires, excellent 
condition, $9.500/besL (414) 
681-6471. ; 

CHEVY 1995 CAMARO 

RS, excellent condition, well 
maintained, low miles, loaded, 
T-tops, must sell, 
$10.200/best. (615) 
385-5736. 

CHEVY 1996 CORSICA, 
power steering. A/C, 73,000 
miles, $7,000. (414) 
662-9731. 

CHEVY 1997 MONTE CAR- 
LO, $13,995. CALL FRANK 
(847) 816-6660. 



804 



Can For" Sale 



CHRYSLER 1969 CON- 
VERTIBLE, air, power wind- 
ows, cruise, standard trans- 
mission, sirver, trip computer, 
newer top, $2,900. (414) 
694-3606. 

CHRYSLER 1994 CON- 
CORDE, new Ikes, 3,5L V6. 
fully loaded, keyless remote, 
excellent - condition, 
$8.000/best (Blue Book 
$10,500). (847) 937-7081 
days, (647) 356-0447 even- 
ings. 

CLASSIC QUARTER 

PANEL Sale. Mustang, Cam- 
aro Nova, Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Ponual, Chevrolet 
morel Trunk Pans, Floor 
pans, Doors, Fenders, Bump- 
ers. Now and California Rust 
Free. Marx Plating and supply 
217-624-6184 

DODOE 1094 SHADOW, 
$3,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660, 

DODGE AVENGER E8 
1997, loaded, garage kept, 
sunroof, premium Infinity ster- 
eo, black, 27K miles, 
$14,700/besL (414) 
752-0401. ' -r 

EAGLE TALON 1993, 

$4,995. CALL ED (847) 625- 

■ 8400. 

EL CAMINO 1986 Candy 
Apple Red, V8, automatic, 
bucket seats, power windows 
and doora. $10,000. (414) 
694-3573, 6016 69th St 

FORD 1996 THUNDER- 
BIRD, $6,995. CALL ED (647) 
625-6400, 

FORD 1962 FALCON, 
BLACK, new body work, 
clean interior, 44K, black, 
$2,000/t>est. (414) S57-2063. 

FORD 1066 THUNDER- 
BIRD, V8. good first teenag- 
ers car, or auto butt, 
$1.10Q/best (647) 487-5712. 

FORD 1988 THUNDER- 
BIRD power steering, power 
brakes, power locks, windows 
and mirrors, titt wheel. AM/FM. 
$2.000. (847) 846-2966. 

FORD 19B9 TAURUS LX 
WAGON, ve, aH power, 
100,000 miles,- welt main- 
tained. 3rd. seat. $2,400. 
(847) 918-6384. 

FORD 1990 FESTTVA, red. 
5-speed, 122K. runs great, 
$1,0Q0/beat (847) 740-8439. 

FORO 1992 TEMPO 

AM/FM cassette, power W/L, 
A/C, power front seals, cruise 
control, new front brakes, de- 
pendable transportation, 
$2,600. (647) 548-2289. 

FORD 1993 MUSTANG 
LX. $5,995. CALL ED (647) 
625-8400. 

FORD 1993 TEMPO, excel- 
lent condition, lots of new 
Items, $2,200/besL (815) 
337-8540. 

FORD 1994 PROBE SE, 
LOADED. Metallic coral 
paint. 3-T hinges, 1 -owner, 
$6,600. SHARP! 8249 26th 
Ave., Kenosha, (414) 
697-5669. (847) 774-7775, 



804 



Can For Sale 



FORD 1998 ESCORT, 
$9,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
516-6660. | 

HYUNDAI 1998 ELAN- 
TRA, $3,995. CALL FRANK 
(847) B 186660. 

INFINITY QX4 1097, 
$24,995. CALL FRANK (647) 
8186660. 

JAGUAR 1976 XJ6L, 4- 
door sedan, red/red leather In- 
terior. Very good condition. 
Can Neil (847) 928-1900 ext. 
111. - ' ' 

JAGUAR XJS CONVERT- 
IBLE 1990. 40.260 miles, no 
winters, dealer maintained, 
beautiful condition, $18,000. 
(647) 567-5274. 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad in 

Classified, can us at ' 

(647) 223-6161 ext 140 

and leave a message. 

We win get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

fax our 24-hour fax line at 

(647)223-2691. 

LINCOLN 1993 TOWN 
CAR. Signature, 74K miles. 
Asking $8,500. (847) 
623-4958 after 530pm. 

MASERAT1 . 1986 Bl- 
TURBO CONVERTIBLE, 
with leather Interkx, 56K, ex- 
cellent maintained, aH records, 
garaged, $9,500. (414) 
245-6861. 

MASERATI 1968 Bl- 

TURBO CONVERTIBLE, wftfl 
leather Intertr. S8K. 

'MAZDA 1997 MIATA, 
$13595. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

MAZDA MX6 1993, $4,995. 

CALL FRANK (647) 816-6660. 

MERCURY 1990 TOPAZ, 
high miles, runs good, 
$700/best (414) 551-8601. 

MERCURY 5TH AVE., 

1988, looks/runs excellent 
Asking $2,300/best Must see. 
(847) 395-4733. 

MIRAGE 1999, $11,995. 
CALL FRANK (647) 8188600. 

MITSUBISHI '1995 
3000OT, $35,995. call frank 
(847)816-6660 

MITSUBISHI 1098 GAL- 
ANT, $11,995. CALL FRANK 
(347)816-6660. 

MITSUBISHI 1998 GAL- 
ANT, $10,595. CALL FRANK 
(847)816-6660. . 

MITSUBISHI 1999 

ECLIPSE, $14,995. CALL 
FRANK (847) 816-6660. 

NISSAN 1996 ALT1MA, 
$11,595. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

OLDS 1994 CUTLASS SU- 
PREME SL/$6,995. CALL ED. 
(847) 625-6400. 

PONT1AC 1995 BONNE- 
VILLE, $11,995. CALL 
FRANK (S47) 816-6660. 

PONTTAC 1996 BONNE- 
VILLE SE, white. (815) 
675-2776. . 



804 



' On for Sale 



POMT1AC 1996 SUN FIRE 
SL, 1 50hp convertible, 12 disc 
CO changer, power windows 
and locks. Many extras. Must 
see. Blue Book $13,700, ask- 
ing $11,500. 6518 23rd. Ave. 
Kenosha. (414) 657-1163, 
(414) 818-1B90. 

PORSCHE 944 1966, ex- 
cellent runner, clean, needs 
minor repairs, $7,500/best. 
(847) 740-8039 after 5pm or 
anytime weekends. 

SAAB '90 0000 Turbo, Sun- 
roof, garage kept. Leather. 
One owner. Excellent condi- 
tion. $5,000/best. (847) 
295-8241 

SAAB 9000' 1967, $3,905. 
CALL FRANK (847) 8188660. 

AUTO AUCTION 

SALVATION ARMY 

Saturday, Oct 2nd. 

9am. 

Over 100 to be sold lo the 

highest bidder. 

No reserve. 

On 176 In Ubsrtyvllle 

East of 1-94 & Lambs 

Farm. 

(847)880-1955. 

SATURN SL1 1994, 

$5,495. CALL FRANK (847) 
8188660. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKE- 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNET! visit 
http;//wwwJpnews.corrV to. 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, in 
ail Lakeland Papers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only $19.79 
for 15 words, then 15c each 
additional word. 

TAURUS WAGON 1993, 
dean, full power, high miles, 
asking $2,750/besl. (815) 
344-1416. . 

TOYOTA 1987 SUPRA, 

brown, very dean, 103K miles, 
A/C, loaded, original owner, 
S3,4O0/best (647) 599-Q345. 

TOYOTA 1986 CAMRY, 
$3,995. CALL ED (847) 625- 
6400. 

TOYOTA 1991 TERCEL, 
$3,995. CALL ED (647) 625- 
6400. 

TOYOTA 1995 CAMRY LE, 
$9,995. CALL ED (847) 625- 
6400. ■ 

TOYOTA 1996 AVALON, 

$14,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
616-6660. ■ 

TOYOTA 1998 CAMRY LE. 

$10,595. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

TOYOTA 1998 COROLLA , 
$10,595. CALL FRANK (847) 
6188660. 

TOYOTA 1998 CAMRY, 
$15,995. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

TRIUMPH SPITFIRE, 

LOOKS and runs good, ask- 
ing $2.500. (847) 623- 0650. 

OLDS 98 REGENCY 1995. 
$12.595. (847) 380-5000. 

MITSUBISHI 1993 

ECLIPSE GS. $6,950. CALL 
MIKE (847) 362-6600. 



H 




TOGO 



' '■■"_. 




vince Of 'Peace V_ ^j? 
Jioltdav Craft fa/r*^ 

1 35 Milwaulrc. I..0.C VilU (Route 1 32 ami 83) 

Saturday. October Z. 1999 
9&0 AM. • 400 VJ(. 

Beaut It ul Jtaiklmtule Crat'ts Raffles 
.ami a Ikib SaltffI Ifat our "Caff. 
2* \Jvr Breakfast or Clinch. Bring a 

£ Jitohl and En/ty Carina Some' 
P Early JMhhiy Showing Ekvief 




Need something 
to do this fall? 
Check out 
these 
exciting 
events. 





Oktoberfest 

: Saturday, October 2, 1999 

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM 
Downtown Square * Monroe, WI 

Live Bands At Turner Hall - 2 PM thru Midnight 

For More Information i 

608-325-7648 • Toll - F^^Mfffc^feiii 





ctobe r 

pur fill Country 
* Holiday 
Craft Show 



Friday Oct. 1st 
9:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 
Saturday Oct. 2nd 
9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.\ 
Sunday Oct. 3rd 
10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 







3 Days Only 

Held ati 




t 

N 

Grand 



>» 
m 
co 



rnee Garden Cent 
797 Waveland Ave 
Gurnee, IL 
(847) 662-7303 




Vail Craft fair festival 

Saturday, Oct. 9 
J0:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Over 70 (rafters 

Free Admission 
Bake Sale 
Concessions 
» Raffle 

Grayslake Community 
High School Field Hous e 

400 N. Lake Street, Grayslake 



r-Vlf*J 



Sponsored by G.C.H.S 
* Band Boosters & 
Inkblots 




place your places to go 
things to do ad here, 
f-gaula at 847-223-8161 




I 



C26 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



October J, J999 



M 



I 
1 



r ■ 



804 



Cars For Sale 



810 



Classic/Antique 
Cars 



828 



FourlVdi 
MnQttp 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 




844 



Motorcycles 



S33 



Handyman 



S78 



Remodeling 



HYUNDAI 1901 EXCEL 
BASIC TRANSPORTATION, 
$2,595. (847) 587-6473. 

CHRYSLER 1087 CON- 
QUEST, $3,695. (847) 856- 
3000. 

PONTIAC 1808 GRAND 
AM $8,995, (847) 587-6473. 

CHEVY 1000 BERETTA, 
$4,995. (847) 856-3000. 



MERCURY 1993 TOPAZ, 
$4,995. (847) 587-6473. 



PONTIAC 1094 SUNBIRD, 
$3,995. (847) 360-5000. 



DELOREAN 1901, 5- 
SPEED, 1 -owner, 10K mlloa, 
now tiros, oxcollont condition. 
No winters. $19,500. Wllmot. 
Wisconsin (414) 877-6069. 

LINCOLN 1972 CONTI- 
NENTAL MACH 4, comploto- 
|y restored, $8.500/bost. Extra 
car for parts. (414) 763-8935, 
(414) 763-7280. 



814 



Service & Parts 



FOUR 17x0 CHROME 

COBRA R-STYLE RIMS 

AND TIRES. 

BRAND NEW. 

S1.400/BEST. 

Call (847) 548-6140 

Ask for Soon or leave 



< I 



PONTIAC 1005 GRAND 
PRIX. $11,995. (847) 856- 

3000. 

PONTIAC 1906 GRAND 
AM. $9.995. (847) 856-3000. 

LINCOLN 1994 CONTI- 
NENTAL, $9,695. (647) 360- 

bCKX). 



E2 



moaaago. 



Vans 



NEEDED 

ISO good people with 

bad credit for 
experimental program in 

auto financing. 
$2,000,000 available for 
auto loans! Limited offer. 

Call now! 
847-244-0700 



810 



Classic/An Uquc Cars 



AMC 1974 MATADOR 
BROUGHAM. 2-door, air. 
cruise, 80K mllos, stored In- 
sido winters, Irophy winner. 
Asking $4,500. (414) 
694-6453. 

ANTIQUE 1948 WILLY'S 
STAKE BODY. 90% restored, 
asking $3,900. (847) 
395-2647. 

CHEVY 1972 CORVETTE, 
64,000 original miles, now 
roar spring, stainloss stool 
brakes, $8.500/bost. (847) 
356-5044. 



ASTRO CONVERSTION 
VAN 1992. $8,995. CALL ED 
(847) 625-8400. 

CHEVY 1094 ASTRO VAN, 
Interior packago with captain 
chairs, power windows/locks, 
running boards, excellent con- 
dition, garage kept, $7,900, 
(414)843-4154. 

CHEW 1997 ASTRO CON- 
VERSION VAN. 32.900 miles, 
warranty, all the bells and 
whistles, $15,900. (414) 
843-3175. 

DODGE 1996 CARAVAN 
SE, 48.000 miles, brand now 
tiros. 2 sliding doors, air, 
$13.000/bost. (847) 
356-5044. 

FORD 1977 CUBE VAN. 
14ft„ runs good. $1,500. 1986 
Plymouth Voyagor. $550. Also 
olhor cars for solo. (414) 
862-9862. 

PLYMOUTH 1090 GRAND 
VOYAGER LE in oxcollont con- 
dilion. Asking $6,000. Call 
(847) 526-5755 days, (847) 
526-8306 evenings. 

GMC 1095 VANDURA STX. 
$6,995. (847) 856-3000. 



FORD 1004 EXPLORER, 
$13,565. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

GREAT DEALI MUST SELL 
MOVINGI 1995 Chovy Tahoe, 
black, 2-door sport, off rood 
package, fully loaded, Norf 
bars Included, $16,350/bost. 
Call anytime If not In leave 
mossago. win call back ASAP 
(647) 909-3334 

HONDA 1096 PASSPORT, 
$17,595. CALL FRANK (847) 
816-6660. 

ISUZU RODEO 1094, groat 
shape, 57K, $12,000/bost. 
(815) 875-1833. 

JEEP 1988 CHEROKEE 5- 
speed, 15,000 mllos on new 
2.8 motor, now brakes, discs, 
bearings, murflor, works good, 
$3,800/bost. Ramon Acuno 
Bam-7pm. (847) 249-0136. 

JEEP 1996 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LTD, $19,995. CALL 
FRANK (847) 816-6660. 

JEEP 1996 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LAREDO, 517,995, 
CALL FRANK (847) 816-6660, 

JEEP 1097 CHEROKEE 
SPORT, while/gray, Seloc- 
Trac 4x4, air, full powor, 
clean, like new, $14,900. 
(414) 694-8562 evonlngs. 

MITSUBISHI 1996 MON- 
TERO, $17,995. CALL 
FRANK (847) 816-6660. 

MITSUBISHI 1908 MON- 
TERO, $25,995. CALL 
FRANK (847) 816 6660 

MITSUBISHI 1999 MON- 
TERO SPORT, $22,995. 
CALL FRAK (847) 816-6660. 



CHEVY 1904 
$4,950. CALL 
362-6600. 



BLAZER, 
MIKE (847) 



CHEVY 1M7 3/4 TON 2WD 
350, unbelievable buy, au- 
tomatic, oxcollont condition, 
$4,500 with cap and rack. 

(847) 662-5202. 

CHEVY 1003 1-TON, dual 
whool, extended cab, Silvera- 
do Packago, 6.5 turbo diosol, 
4-spood automatic, 410, dual 
lanks. $14,000/bost. (847) 
263-7320. 

DODGE 1008 
RAMCHARGER 318 eld au- 
tomatic, 4x4, A/C, powor wind- 
ows/door locks, tilt, cruise, 
78.000 mllos, oxcollont eondl- 
tloa (815) 759-1220. 

DODGE 1997 DAKOTA, ox- 
collont condition, Club Cab, 
loadod, 50,000 mlloa, 
$13,500. Days (630) 514- 
8631, ovonlngs (815) 
336-9249. 

FORD 1080 PICKUP 
TRUCK with cop. ratty rims, , 
now front ond, ptus AoroCraft 
boat, St.OOO/bosi. (815) 
363-6956. 

FORD 1987 TRUCK F-350, 
cab and chassis, 6.9 diosol, 
now fonders and doors, 
$4,000/bost. (414) 877-9644. 

FORD 1008 RANGER, 
SHARP, 30,000 miles, A/C. 
bodliner. extended warranty, 
now $15K, sacrifice $9,999. 
(847) 812-8443 leave mes- 
sago. 

NISSAN 1004 PICK-UP, 
$7,995. CALL ED (847) 625- 

8400. 

TRAILER 30' FLATBED, 

trl-axio, olectrlc brakes, 
$695/bost. (414) 308-4814. 

NISSAN 1005 PICKUP 
EXT. CAB. $8,950, CALL MIKE 
(847) 362-6600. 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 1069 
HERITAGE SOFTAIL, 

SOcu.ln.. period and polished 
hoods, performance com, 

S&S carburetor, oxtromoly do- 
tallod custom point and 
chromo work. To soe this 
show Harloy, Call Bill at (414) 
834-7947. Asking $27,000. 
Sorlous Inqulrlos only. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON RED 
1884 FLHTC, completely ro- 
bullt In 1997, oxcollont condi- 
tion, $9,000/bost. (815) 
344-4273, 

HD FXR REPLICA 1998, 
custom built from ground up. 
SSS Noss. Must soil, $22,000. 
(414) 878-3182 call after- 
noons. 

HONDA 1083 CX650 Cus- 
tom, 1 1K, now rear tiro, runs 
good, must boo, $l,150/best. 
(414)654-6885. 

MOTORCYCLE 1008 

ZX9R, low mites, oxcollont 
condition, now tiros, groan 
windshield. Must soil. 
$8.200/bosl. (815) 385-5736. 



SUZUKI 1908 GSXR750. 
bought new 7/99, less than 
450 miles, $7,600/bost. (847) 
244-0487. 



THE HANDYMAN NO Job 

too smalt. Painting, carpentry 
ond ropalr work. Reasonable 
rates and free osllmatos. 
(847) 223-7724. 



S39 


Housekeeping 



JACK'S 

REMODELING 

•Basement Finishing 

•Famltyrooms & OWcerooms 

•Electrical & Plumbing 

»Kjtchons 4 Baths 

•Vinyl Roolacomont Windows 

•Soffit Fascia, 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 548-3759. 



DEBBIE'S CLEANING 

SERVICEI 

18 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

* Holiday Cleaning, 

•Move outs, 

♦Sonlor Specials. 

Reasonable Rates, 

References available. 

(847) 073-9913. 
i iii i mi i ii urn 



Resutts. 
Call Paula to pl*e« 
ywaraff, ■ 




S42 


Landscaping 



S24 



Education/ 
Instruction 



4) Calvary Christian 



DODGE 1995 CONVER- 
SION VAN, $9,995. (847) B56- 
3000. 



844 


Motorcycles 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



FORD 1992 F-150 short- 
box 4WO, black, xlt. full pow- 
er, 351 V8, automatic, Ton- 
noau cover, oxcollont condi- 
tion, $9,000. (847) 546-6131 
leave message. 



FORD 1990 F-150 XLT, 
nice condition, 1 -owner, 
$2,800. Ron (647) 526-3290. 

CHEVROLET 1992 SIL- 
VERADO, full slzo pickup, 
with 3-loolboxos. 87,000 
miles, excellent condition. 
Good work truck. $8,500. 
(414)694-9671. 



1975 H.D. XLH SPORT- 
STER, good condition. $3,750. 
(847) 546-9367 Bob. 

1994 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
ULTRA CLASSIC, lots extras. 
39,000 milos. must seo/soll. 
(414) 767-0671 after 5pm. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1070 
FLH ELECTRAGL1DE S&S 
Corb, shovel, extras, clean. 
$7.500/OBO. Call evenings 
(414)694-7715. 



5 

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Learning Center 
Prcparinc Children 
Spiritually & 
Academically tor the 
future. 

• ChriM Centered 
Curriculum 

• Nurturing Stiff 

• Fun & Friendly 
Atmosphere 

• Daycares preschool 
for ages 3ovty 

• Open 6:30AM-6PM 
Mon.-Fri. 

Kindergarten readiness 
for children entering 
Kindergarten in the 
Fall of '99 

Now accepting 
applications fnr Fall 

134 MonavUlc Rd. • a 
Lake Villa » 

Mi: 847*265-05HO 5 

Fx: 847-356-6524 m 



NATURAL LANDSCAPING 

•Sealcoatmg 

- Leaf-Cloan-Upa 

Troo & Shrub Planting 

"24hr. SnowpJowlng- 

Froo Estimates. 

(847) 740-3382 

(847) 980 6360. 

S. HERNANDEZ 

LANDSCAPING 

'No Job Too Small 

-Quality Workmanship 

•Mowing 

"Tree Trimming 

•Flower Beds 

Troo Planting. 

•Free Estimates 

•Fully Insurod. 

Sirvorio Hemandoz 

Round Lake Pant, III. 

(847) 546-4617 or 721-4817, 



S87 


Storage 



h 

ft 
c 

o 

m 
i 

* 

8 

C 

* 
J 
1 
3 



S48 


legal Srnices 



DIVORCE $185.00. PROP- 
ERTY, children, missing 
spouse OK. Bankruptcies 
$225. Stop credit calls. 8am- 
8 pm, Monday- Saturday 600- 
688-3188. 800-990-9835. 



$95 OUTDOOR, $225 IN- 
DOOR, per-soason, North 
Twin Lakes. 70x70x14 polo 
bam and six car garago avail- 
able. (847) 265-0212, (847) 
973-0614. . 

BOAT STORAGE NEEDED 
Dry, clean, Indoor storage 
12ft. by 30fL Needed for win- 
tor and possibto In and out 
summer storage. Gurneo area 
proforrod. Call Nicole at (847) 
249-3313 between 9am-4pm. 

INDOOR WINTER STOR- 
AGE $2.00 per sq.ft., for Oc- 
tober thru April. Limited ipaco 
available. Noar Twin Lakes. 
Wisconsin. (847) 540-9389. 



STORAGE NEAR STATE 
LINE, ArtUoch a/oa. outside/in- 
side. Boats, RVs, Trailers, 
Heavy Equiprnont. Seasonal, 
monthly rates. Seasonal rates 
start at $100, outside. Call 
now, rosorve your place for 
winter. (847) 791-8178, (414) 
843-1817. 




S93 


Trees/Plants 



DC TILE WE Wo Instsall ce- 
ramic, vinyl tile, Pa/quot. and 
Porgo floors. For free esti- 
mates call (847) 395-0777, 
paoor (708) 988-8504. 



Mega Discount Nursery 
Store-Wide Liquidation Sale. 
Savo 50-80% on Shade 
Trees. Evergreens, Fruit 
Tree*, and Flowering Bushes 
and Shrubs. All sizes large 
and smalt. Also Indoor plants. 
Open 9am-9pm, 7 days/week. 
1901 E. Rawson, Milwaukee, 
Wise. (414)571-5565. 







A PRIVATE PARTY MERCHANDISE AD 



Hi 



'') 



Name. 



Address. 
Phone_ 
City 



State 



Zip. 



CLASSIFIED LISTINGS 



19.75 = 15 words or fewer, one week, 150 each additional 

word. Ads will be seen in all 11 Lakeland Newspapers, The 

Market Journal, Great Lakes Bulletin and on the Internet. 



Please check one box below! 



DEADLINE: Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 

Please allow extra time for orders 

being sent through mail*. 

Payment must be received with order. 



□ GARAGE SALES 330 

□ LAWN & GARDEN 348 

□ HOUSEHOLD MERCHANDISE 340 

□ APPLIANCES 304 

Q MISC. MERCHANDISE 350 

Q PETS 360 

□ WANTED TO BUY .370 

GIVEAWAY 120 

We'll help you get rid of your 
unwanted treasures. Your ad will 
reach 200,000+. It works! Call 
(847) 223-8181 ext. 140 and ask 
for Usa. Tho classified deadline Is 
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. 



□ BOATS & EQUIPMENT 710 

Q MOTORCYCLES 644 

□ CAMPERS & TRAVEL TRAILERS . . .704 

□ AUTOMOBILE LOAN &. FINANCING .804 

□ VANS & TRUCKS 834 

□ AUTOMOBILES WANTED 848 

□ AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE 804 



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Drop ad off in our office from 8:00 am-5:00 pm Monday-Friday 
at 30 S. Whitney, Grayslake, IL or fax to our 24 HOUR fax line at 847-223-2691 



* We are not responsible for ads received late that were sent through regular mail. 



If 



October 1, 199$ 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C27 



Lakeland Newspapers is your 




To These Fine Lakeland Area Businesses & Services 



To Place v 
Your Ad Here 
Call 

847-223-8161 



AFFORDABLE HOME 
— SERVICES INC — 



Over 34 years of Quality Service 



FttTERIOR 

Exterior Painting • Carpentry 
* • Alum. & Vinyl Siding 

• Fascia & Soffit 
Vinyl Replacement Windows 
• Roofing-New & Repairs 



I^ITRIOR 

• Interior Painting 
• Drywalling & Repairs . 
• Ceramic Tile • Insulations | 
All Types of Floor Coverings 
• Carpeting 



Call For A Free Estimate 
(847)356-9282 



PRO SPEC SECURITY 

WINDOW WELL COVERS 



• HIDDEN SECURITY LOCKS, 
OPEN FROM THE INSIDE ONLY! 
fWENT PROTECTED. 

• A safe and effective means of 
securing your home and family 

from unwanted intruders. 

• Prevent Injury to children and 
pets. 

• Made of perforated steel allowing 
proper ventflarjon and sunlight 

• One-time cost lasts for years. 



847-265-653 6 




Call Joe 




CASH For Alum, Cans 

Copper-Bran 

Insulated Wire 



Chicago Surplus 

1 1304-260th Ave 

Trevor, Wise. 

dncMilcWcstof83&t: 



Turn North on 259th 




Mon-Fri 9-5pm 

Sat 9-3 

Closed 12-1 Lunch 



262-862-2517 





Let Us Protect Your Trees 

Services 

Deep Root Feeding 

Insect Disease Spraying 

trunk injections for nutrient or 

micrbnutrient deficiencies 

Analysis of tree problems 

Turf & Tree, M.D, 

(847) 838-0469 



/DECKS plus 

. . • MNfiTft UCTION 




• CONSTRUCTION 
• GENERAL CARPENTRY 

• Custom Decks 

• Porches * Room Additions 

•Basement Remodeling 
• Bath rooms - Kitchens 
•Custom Carpentry 
Improvements k Repairs! 
mttflUDD t* BONDED 

ran kstmato 
C^if^ C414) 

^^^",1 I lets* Cill Ciry Kolk-»u 




CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICE, INC? 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

'Call Us For Fast Courteous Service' 

RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL 

33265 N. Rte. 45 

Wlldwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-4682 





Painting 
Exjfcrtlns' 




- ■' : 



mmmmm§^ 




H or izbn Remodeling 



•m Full Service Remodeling 
am Dry wall 

Basement Finishing 

Garage Finishing 

C Residential and Commercial .'-~ :■■ 



">*& 



Insured 



C8471 838-5949 




,-;- 



>»»♦»» » » 



-8428 ! 

* 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC IMC. 

33261 N. HIGHWAY 45 

WILDWOOD, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8691 




SMITH 

PAINT • STAIN • WATERSEAL 



Houses • Carafe* • Declu 

Interiors O Exteriors 

Sponging • Biff tolling • Feathering 



WOOD RESTORATION 

Strip. Sand, Stain & Varnish 

your wood to look beautiful 

again 

847-244-2202 



i 



FIREWOOD 
UNLIMITED 

Seasoned two years 
. 25yrs. In business 
Fast, Free Delivery 
Credit-Cards O.K. 

• Muted Hardwoods S7 VF.C 
•OakJIIO/F.C 

• Clieny Birch & liickory raiiisl J95/EC 
Separated $120 

Dl/COUNT ON TWO OR MORE 

(847) 888-9999 



J 



ALL AMERICAN 
f CONST. * 



MniiDs/Custoen Rtmodcfing 

Quality work at affordable prices 

SPECIAL ON BASEMENTS NOW 

WITHIN 24 HR. HANDYMAN SERVICE 

Free Estimates 

847-548-5110 

l ic. Bonded 
I fc Intured 




The 

Home 
Improvement 

Network 



"For Every Home Improvement Project 
"One Call Gets You 3 Free Estimates" 



"A Free Contractor Referral Service" 



Don't hire a contractor you know nothing about!! 

We refer prescreened contractors to vou for your convenience!! 

Call Now for vour 3 Free Estimates: (847)604-4949 
hmp://www.thehomeiiTiprQvement.com 





PROFESSIONAL 
HOUSE PAINTING 

Interior & Exterior 

FREE Estimates 

Call 
Hans Killng 

847-837-9153 





Custom In i 
Floor sending 
Staining 

Hydrollne finishing 
Glitza 

Wsterborne finish 
'REE ESTII 




iKITCHENl/BAttMENTlj 

CARPENTRY - TILE 

SMALL JOBS Otf 

TOMJUOLBAtA. 

t*A1\ 1QS-189J 




North Shore . | 
Water Softening Co. 



Salt Delivery Special 



6-50 lb. Pro's Pick Duracute Salt 
use in art? softener 

* * * Delivered $48* * * * 

Call 625-8076 Today 



Jerry Shaver 

TRK.AEXC. 

and 
Landscaping 



^ e 



6 P U tctB^ 



&y Demolition \ 
< Cleanup > 
\ Hauling / 

815-385-8959 



j\o Wlrne to Cmlemil 

You're always busy and cleaning Is a chore... 
Let us tidy up for you! 

We offer cleaning: 
•Weekly •Bl-Monihly 'Monthly 
•Special Occasions & Relocations 
■ -Very Reasonable Rales • Licensed, Insured, & Bonded 
. -FREE Estimates - References Available 

PRO-MAIDS 

Professional Cleaning Service 
StaciBrubaker (847)514-6855 




Lakeland Js/cwspapers 
Antique Directory 

is the place where you 
can discover places to 
find liidden treasures. 



RuidanttaJ and 

Small Commercial 



dfift^Checkitoutin 



the Classifieds, 
the first week 
of each montK- 



■ 



1 



I . 



r -» 



■ i 



C28 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



October 1,1999 




THE LEGEND IS COMING! 



to Gurnee 




Licenses of Gold's Gym 
Franchise, Inc. 



PRE- GRAND I1PE1U1MG SPECIAL RATES 



PHASE I PHAS 



I V 1 



JOIN NOW 







JOIN BY 

7-31-99 

* PLUS ONETIME 

ENROLLMENT 

FEEOF$99 S2 



IY PAY r — 

PRICE MFTEK 
10-15-99 






JOIN BY 

8-31-99 

* PLUS ONE TIME 

ENROLLMENT 

FEE OF $99 ea 



JOIN BY 

10-15-99 

* PLUS ONE TIME 

ENROLLMENT 
FEE OF $99°° 



REGULAR FITNESS 

CARD RATE 
* PLUS ONE TIME 
ENROLLMENT FEE 

""= $199°° 



OUR ALL NEW FACILITY WILL INCLUDE 



• 20,000 SQ. FT. OF PURE FITNESS 

• THE BEST AEROBICS PROGRAM 
WITH FLEXI-FLOOR® 

• CHILDCARE/KID'S CLUB" 

• CERTIFIED ONE-ON-ONE TRAINERS 

• SUPER NUTRITION CENTER „.,^.. P -. I 

• COMPLETE LOCKER FACILITY FOR MEN/WOMEN 

• SPINNING® AREAS ONLY 

• SAUNA AND TANNING" 



• 70 PIECES OF CARDIO EQUIPMENT WITH 
CARDIO THEATRE 

• JUICE BAR 
. LIFE STEP 

• LIFE FITNESS TREADMILLS 

• LIFE CYCLES 

• NET PULSE WITH WEB ACCESS 

• PRECOR EFX 

• STAIRMASTER STEPMILL 



• HAMMER STRENGTH 
•FLEX 

• BODYMASTER 

• ICARIAN 
• CYBEX 

• TONS OF FREE WEIGHTS 

• AND MORE 

"SPECIAL AMENITIES ARE OPTIONAL 
AT AN EXTRA COST 



ENTER TO WIN A $1000 CASH PRIZE, A TRIP FOR 2 TO CANCUN, MEXICO, 

A HIGH PERFORMANCE SKI-DOO MXZ600 SNOWMOBILE DONATED BY 
RON S BRIAN'S MOTORSPORTS, WAUKEGAN, PLUS MUCH, MUCH MORE. 

Call Ndw and Save!! 



Preview Hours at the 
Gurnee Holiday Inn 

Mon-Fri: - 

8 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

Sat 

9 A.M. to 7 P.M. 

Sun 

10 A.M. to 6 P.M. 



Charge Cards 

and Checks 

Accepted 



Temporary Preview Center Located 
in the Holiday Inn, Gurnee 



gggElB 





Franchisees of Gold's Gym 
Franchising, Inc.